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An Indian Summer (1912)

A lonely old widower ( W. Chrystie Miller ) arrives in town and seeks out a pleasant boarding place. The house he selects may be pleasant and homelike, but most of all it is owned by a ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
W. Chrystie Miller ... The Widower
Kate Bruce ... The Widow
... The Widow's Daughter
... The Widow's Daughter
Bert Hendler ... The Young Man
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Dorothy Bernard
Harry Hyde ... Among Borders
Frank Opperman ... Among Boarders
... Among Boarders
Kate Toncray ... Among Boarders
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Storyline

A lonely old widower ( W. Chrystie Miller ) arrives in town and seeks out a pleasant boarding place. The house he selects may be pleasant and homelike, but most of all it is owned by a widow ( Kate Bruce ), and managed her daughter ( Mary Pickford ). The widow and the widower are impressed with each other at first sight and a romance is imminent, but it came very near spoiled. The widower realizes his hair is both white and scant and feels that unless he looks a little younger, his chances with the widow are slim. He writes to a hair tonic manufacturer for aid.While trying to keep the letter hidden from the widow, she becomes suspicious and imagines it is from another woman, so she turns about to make him jealous. Eventually a unique trick of fate smooths out all their misunderstandings. Written by Pamela Short

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Genres:

Short | Romance

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8 July 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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There is a fine beach scene
14 December 2016 | by See all my reviews

As the title implies, the story is of the courtship of two persons no longer young, one, the man, even less so; not too old to act, though. Little Mary helps out in the play. Likewise is there a maid who contributes. There is a fine beach scene, where the estranged old lovers are marooned by the incoming tide. The estrangement had arisen over the failure of the old chap to show the widow a letter that had come to him. As the enclosure referred to a hair restorer and as he was particularly shy of any crowning glory, he naturally felt disinclined to reveal it. The widow took adequate measures to make him jealous, as she assumed the letter was from a woman. In the closing scene, following the reconciliation, the widow herself applies the hair restorer to her now affianced husband, to the marked disgust of the maid and the glee of little Mary. But previously she had had a look at that letter. - The Moving Picture World, July 20, 1912


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