Out from the Shadow (1911)

Since the death of their only child Mrs. Vane gives herself up to morbid grief, to the neglect of her husband, herself and household duties. She sits continually weeping over the child's ... See full summary »

Director:

D.W. Griffith
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Cast

Credited cast:
Blanche Sweet ... Mrs. Vane
Edwin August ... Mr. Vane
Jeanie Macpherson ... The Young Widow
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Donald Crisp ... At Dance
John T. Dillon John T. Dillon ... At Dance (as Jack Dillon)
Joseph Graybill
Charles Hill Mailes ... At Dance
Alfred Paget ... At Dance
Marion Sunshine ... At Dance
Charles West Charles West ... At Dance
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Storyline

Since the death of their only child Mrs. Vane gives herself up to morbid grief, to the neglect of her husband, herself and household duties. She sits continually weeping over the child's little garments, and despite her husband's efforts to cheer her, she persists in indulging in this moroseness. Her husband, therefore, is forced to seek more agreeable companionship outside his own home, and in time the wife appreciates his indifference. She complains to her mother, who tells her she alone is to blame, and if she doesn't change she will lose his love altogether. The wife realizes the strength of this advice, and determines to win her husband back. However, the awakening has come too late, for her husband has formed an attachment for a vivacious young widow. More subtle plans must be formed, and she succeeds in fascinating him at a dance they both attend, by arousing his jealousy. Written by Biograph advertisement

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 August 1911 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Biograph Company See more »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Blanche Sweet wears an evening dress that she would later use for One Is Business, the Other Crime (1912). See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mary Pickford: The Muse of the Movies (2008) See more »

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User Reviews

It shows in the producer the eye of a master scene maker
2 April 2016 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

It is the freshly charming acting and the perfect photography of pretty scenes and costumes that make this society drama acceptable. The story would be pleasing, too, if it hung together, but it most certainly does not. The producer's failure to make the story hang together doesn't keep it from being convincing as a whole. The skill he has shown in selecting players to present the different characters and the sincere acting of these players only serve to make a glaring spectacle of the picture's great shortcoming. The man's wife is moping for her dead baby and it happens that he meets another young woman, emancipated but very attractive. Her growing power over him is understandable. The wife wakes up to the situation when it seems too late. The climax comes at a dance (a beautiful scene) and it is here that the story falls down. The hostess who gives the dance knows the situation. The wife comes and is received. The husband comes with the other woman and is admitted; just think of it. Of course this reviewer cannot affirm that they would be turned away, but he doesn't think that the hostess would hold out her hand to them. In coming together, the two showed more brass than fate usually gives to two individuals. The acting of the whole picture, with no break, is very fine indeed. The young wife is the "little school teacher" of a former picture; one might call her the Maud Adams of the photoplay screen. Very commendable is the acting of the interloper also, and the girlfriend of the wife's. In the scene where she stands smiling at the worried interloper her work is very commendable. In fact, the whole film is full of such fine details as that little play; it shows in the producer the eye of a master scene maker. - The Moving Picture World, August 19, 1911


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