In 19th-century France, Jean Valjean, who for decades has been hunted by the ruthless policeman Javert after breaking parole, agrees to care for a factory worker's daughter. The decision changes their lives forever.

Director:

Tom Hooper

Writers:

William Nicholson (screenplay by), Alain Boublil (screenplay by) | 5 more credits »
Popularity
581 ( 11)
Won 3 Oscars. Another 82 wins & 177 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Hugh Jackman ... Jean Valjean
Russell Crowe ... Javert
Anne Hathaway ... Fantine
Amanda Seyfried ... Cosette
Sacha Baron Cohen ... Thénardier
Helena Bonham Carter ... Madame Thénardier
Eddie Redmayne ... Marius
Aaron Tveit ... Enjolras
Samantha Barks ... Éponine
Daniel Huttlestone ... Gavroche
Cavin Cornwall ... Convict 1
Josef Altin ... Convict 2
Dave Hawley Dave Hawley ... Convict 3 (as David Hawley)
Adam Jones Adam Jones ... Convict 4
John Barr John Barr ... Convict 5
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Storyline

Jean Valjean, known as Prisoner 24601, is released from prison and breaks parole to create a new life for himself while evading the grip of the persistent Inspector Javert. Set in post-revolutionary France, the story reaches resolution against the background of the June Rebellion. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Fight. Dream. Hope. Love. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for suggestive and sexual material, violence and thematic elements | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Initially for his opening introductory scene, Hugh Jackman was going to be shirtless when he's seen as a prisoner in the storm hauling a ship into port. But Jackman thought that this was meant to be a serious dramatic performance and showing off his abs the first thing in the movie would detract from that and the audience would not take him seriously. So he went and told director Tom Hooper, "If you have me with my shirt off, people are going to say, 'You were just doing what Jackman demanded in his contract.'" Hooper replied, "I don't think we need to do it without your shirt" and in the finished film Jackman keep his shirt on though his costume is torn in several places revealing hints of his muscular physique underneath. Several promotional stills and camera tests of Jackman's original costume were later released online. They indeed show Jackman in an open jacket with deeply shredded six packs abs but at Jackman's request the costume was never used for filming. See more »

Goofs

In "At the End of the Day" when all the women quickly form two rows the positioning of Fantine and the factory women standing on either side of her changes about three times. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Jean Valjean: Look down, look down, don't look them in the eye.
Chain Gang: Look down, look down, you're here until you die.
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Crazy Credits

The first six seconds of the Universal Pictures logo are cut out, fading in when the studio's name starts to fly over the globe. See more »


Soundtracks

The Sewers
Written by Herbert Kretzmer, Claude-Michel Schönberg, and Alain Boublil
Performed by Hugh Jackman and Russell Crowe
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User Reviews

 
Why We Pay to Watch Others Suffer
25 December 2012 | by Danusha_GoskaSee all my reviews

Les Miserables is very old fashioned entertainment. It's a series of crescendo moments with no build-up, no backstory, no pause. It's like eating just the topping of the pecan pie, and not bothering with the crust or filling. We were just ten minutes into the movie when I had to look at my watch and ask, okay, how long can they keep this up? Climax after climax, plot twist after plot twist, tearjerking scene after tearjerking scene. Oceans! Mountains! Punishment! Suffering! Religion! Redemption! Will there be a break for lunch? Will we be able to catch our breath?

If you can watch this film without crying, I don't want to know you. The woman behind me was on the edge of her seat, not just because I smell good. The audience at the 10:40 a.m. matinée – the theater was packed – applauded at the end, and was very slow to leave the theater, even as the closing credits rolled.

Typical of big, fat, nineteenth-century novels, there are numerous implausible coincidences that drive the plot. These coincidences took me out of the movie, but that was a good thing. The human suffering on screen was overwhelming: suicide, enslavement, exploitation of living humans' body parts, prostitution, disease, spite, malice, child abuse, starvation, sadism, a dying man escaping through very graphic sewerage. I did have to repeat to myself, "This is only a movie" even as tears streamed down my cheeks.

Jean Valjean is imprisoned for stealing a loaf of bread to feed his sister's starving children. He slaves for twenty years. He hauls a massive, capsized sailing ship. The scene does look like obviously fake CGI, but that doesn't make it any less gut wrenching. The workers sing, "You'll always be a slave. You are standing in your grave." They are the men we see in Sebastiao Salgado photographs of Third World laborers. They are Ilya Repin's "Barge Haulers on the Volga." Valjean's nemesis is the crazily obsessive policeman, Javert. They spar throughout the film, as Valjean's fate rises and falls and rises and falls and rises … you get the idea.

A story this big, this broad, and this implausible requires one hundred percent commitment from the performers. Hugh Jackman as Jean Valjean is superb. He believes. He emotes. He is as big as the story itself. Jackman is the heart and soul of "Les Miserables." I loved him. Anne Hathaway, Eddie Redmayne, Samantha Barks, Helena Bonham Carter, Sacha Baron Cohen – they all had me convinced. Russell Crowe was a surprising disappointment. He's a brilliant actor and I kept waiting for him to bring some fire, some ice, some power, some insight to Javert, the obsessive and punitive policeman who mercilessly hounds Jean Valjean. I wanted a memorable moment that would make me feel that Crowe's performance brought Javert to intimate life for me. That moment did not arrive.

I wondered while watching this movie whether it will be embraced by the political left or the political right. It is a deeply and unashamedly Christian film. A Catholic priest, emulating Jesus, is the catalyst. Valjean spends the rest of the film working to live up to the priest's Biblical example. "Les Miserable" is leftist in that it depicts the poor rising up, but then the poor fail their own putative saviors, and allow them to be massacred, alone. Javert, representing law and order, is a monster. The film's brief glimpse of heaven is like some limousine liberal's fantasy.

I think "Les Miserables" is as popular as it is for the same reason that Cinderella is so popular. When "Les Miserable" was a stage play, tickets were a very expensive and difficult to acquire luxury. It is ironic that a play about the wretched of the earth would be such a luxury entertainment. Why do we enjoy watching people much poorer and more desperate than we will ever be? Why do we pay for the privilege? Because we all see ourselves in Cinderella, in Jean Valjean, no matter how lucky we are. I'll certainly never stand in cold sea water with iron shackles around my wrists and neck, overseen by a cold sadist like Javert. But, along with millions of others, I saw my own struggles in Valjean, and thanked God that I didn't have it as bad as he. If Jean Valjean can go on, I can, too!

I wish the songs had been a tad better. There are a couple of good ones, "I dreamed a dream" and "Do you hear the people sing?" All the actors sing very well. Russell Crowe and Hugh Jackman sing especially well.


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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 December 2012 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Les Miz See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$61,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$27,281,735, 30 December 2012

Gross USA:

$148,809,770

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$441,809,770
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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