5.6/10
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9 user 7 critic

Harakiri (1919)

Not Rated | | Drama | 6 December 1920 (Denmark)
The Buddhist priest wants the Daughter of the Daimyo to become a priestess at the Forbidden Garden. The Daimyo thinks if he were in Europe that his daughter should decide on her own, but he... See full summary »

Director:

Fritz Lang

Writers:

David Belasco (play), Max Jungk | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview:
Paul Biensfeldt Paul Biensfeldt ... Daimyo Tokuyawa
Lil Dagover ... O-Take-San
Georg John ... Buddhist Monk
Meinhart Maur Meinhart Maur ... Prince Matahari
Rudolf Lettinger ... Karan
Erner Huebsch Erner Huebsch ... Kin-Be-Araki
Käte Küster Käte Küster ... Hanake (as Kaete Juster)
Niels Prien Niels Prien ... Olaf J. Anderson
Herta Heden Herta Heden ... Eva
Loni Nest Loni Nest ... Child
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Storyline

The Buddhist priest wants the Daughter of the Daimyo to become a priestess at the Forbidden Garden. The Daimyo thinks if he were in Europe that his daughter should decide on her own, but he is denounced and has to commit harakiri. She meets Olaf, a European officer, falls in love and marries him, but after a few months he has to return to Europe. She gives birth to a child and is waiting for him, while he marries in Europe. When he comes back to Japan 4 years later, he is accompanied by his European wife... Written by Stephan Eichenberg <eichenbe@fak-cbg.tu-muenchen.de>

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Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was originally released in the United States and other countries as Madame Butterfly because of the source material on which it is based and which also inspired Giacomo Puccini's eponymous 1904 opera. See more »

User Reviews

 
"Fear the unrelenting wrath of the Buddha!"
28 October 2001 | by zetesSee all my reviews

It's always cool to see rare, barely seen films from famous directors. This one is Fritz Lang's take on M. Butterfly (a story (a novel? a play?) with which I am unfamiliar), about a Japanese woman who marries a European man, only to be abandoned by him, poor and pregnant. The story of the film is very good and should have made a better film. Unfortunately, Lang's direction is very unimpressive and plodding. The actors, too are poor, except for Lil Dangover as the Japanese woman, who is merely adequate. It reeks of early directorial effort. It's definitely worth seeing if you get the chance, if only as a curio. 6/10.

PS: the quotation I cited in the summary above is actually spoken in the film by a Buddhist monk who wants to destroy the Japanese woman. Can you think of any god more intimidating than the Buddha? I know I can't.


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Details

Country:

Germany

Language:

None | Dutch

Release Date:

6 December 1920 (Denmark) See more »

Also Known As:

Harakiri See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

|

Sound Mix:

Silent

Color:

Black and White (tinted)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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