5.8/10
269
8 user 4 critic

A Midsummer Night's Dream (1909)

In ancient Athens, four young lovers escape into the woods. Meanwhile, tradesmen rehearse a play. All of them suffer from the shenanigans of mischievous fairies.

Directors:

Charles Kent, J. Stuart Blackton (co-director)

Writers:

Eugene Mullin (scenario), William Shakespeare (play)
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Cast

Credited cast:
Walter Ackerman Walter Ackerman ... Demetrius
Charles Chapman Charles Chapman ... Quince
Dolores Costello ... Fairy
Helene Costello ... Fairy
Maurice Costello ... Lysander
Julia Swayne Gordon ... Helena
Gladys Hulette ... Puck
William Humphrey
Elita Proctor Otis ... Hippolyta
William V. Ranous ... Bottom
William Shea ... Mechanical
Rose Tapley ... Hermia
Florence Turner ... Titania
Clara Kimball Young ... Penelope
James Young
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Storyline

Theseus, the Duke of Athens, is engaged to be married to Hippolyta. One of the Duke's courtiers has a daughter, Hermia, who, for business reasons, he decides shall marry Demetrius: but she is in love with Lysander. Her father appeals to the Duke and he decrees that Hermia must obey her father or forever remain unmarried. The lovers decide to elope and they are followed by the rejected suitor, Demetrius, and Helena, who loves him in vain. On the night of the elopement a number of townspeople are rehearsing in the woods a play which they intend to present at the wedding of Duke Theseus. The eloping lovers, followed by Demetrius and Helena, wander to the same part of the forest that the players frequent. Meanwhile among the fairies of the forest a little love episode has ended in a tiff and Oberon, the king of the fairies, sends his messenger, Puck, for an herb, which, when placed upon the eyes of a sleeper, will cause him or her to love the first creature seen upon awakening. The ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Plot Keywords:

love | play | fairy | wedding | weaver | See All (34) »


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 December 1909 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

En Skærsommernatsdrøm See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was shot in the summer of 1909 but held back for release on Christmas Day. See more »

Quotes

Title Card: [last title card]
[SPOILER]
Title Card: Penelope discovers the mischief that has been done. She restores the weaver to his normal shape and happily unites the lovers.
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Connections

Version of Quitxalla: Embolica que fa fort, Puck III (1980) See more »

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User Reviews

Fall In Love with what You See
26 May 2005 | by tedgSee all my reviews

I'm becoming convinced that it is extremely difficult to bring Shakespeare to film without doing some major translations, at least using modern notions. There's just too much invested in the spoken language itself from whence all the stuff flows that is normally associated with the cinematic.

I've been looking at several silent treatments. Naturally enough, they fall flat. But this one doesn't because it emphasizes the play of the "mechanicals." The abstraction of that play on film, the jumping and gesticulating is along the same lines as ALL the acting of that day, but double.

If you were going to try a film, the best plot device is the play within the play (of any of his plays that have this). And the best abstraction strategy is to just take his existing exaggeration and exaggerate it.

It is all a matter of what you are tricked into falling in love with.

Ted's Evaluation -- 3 of 3: Worth watching.


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