When a litter of Dalmatian puppies are abducted by the minions of Cruella de Vil, the parents must find them before she uses them for a diabolical fashion statement.

Directors:

Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske (as Hamilton S. Luske) | 1 more credit »

Writers:

Bill Peet (story), Dodie Smith (novel)
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Popularity
3,562 ( 508)
Won 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Rod Taylor ... Pongo (voice)
J. Pat O'Malley ... Colonel / Jasper / Mechanic (voice)
Betty Lou Gerson ... Cruella De Vil / Miss Birdwell (voice)
Martha Wentworth ... Nanny / Queenie / Lucy (voice)
Ben Wright ... Roger (voice)
Cate Bauer Cate Bauer ... Perdita (voice)
David Frankham ... Sgt. Tibs (voice) (as Dave Frankham)
Frederick Worlock ... Horace / Inspector Graves (voice) (as Fred Worlock)
Lisa Davis ... Anita (voice)
Tom Conway ... Quizmaster / Collie (voice)
Tudor Owen ... Towser (voice)
George Pelling George Pelling ... Danny (voice)
Ramsay Hill Ramsay Hill ... Television Announcer / Labrador (voice)
Sylvia Marriott ... (voice)
Queenie Leonard ... Princess (voice)
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Storyline

Pongo and Perdita have a litter of 15 puppies. Cruella De Vil takes a fancy to the pups, and wants to get hold of them, as well as more pups, to make herself a lovely dalmatian skin coat... Cruella hires some thugs to kidnap the pups and hold them at her mansion. Will Pongo and Perdita find them in time ? Written by Colin Tinto <cst@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Crafty Cruella... chasing every spotted puppy in town. See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The name "Perdita" means "lost." In the book, Perdita is a separate, stray Dalmatian taken in and given this name. The name of Pongo's mate in the book is simply named "Missis." See more »

Goofs

In the final chase scene, Jasper and Horace's truck is coming down the hill and will cut in front of the van in a few seconds. However, the time taken with Cruella and Pongo (saving the puppy) is clearly longer. Also, when we see the truck a 2nd time, it is much closer to the van than in the following shot of the collision with Cruella. It would have hit the van or passed in front. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Pongo: My story begins in London, not so very long ago. And yet so much has happened since then, that it seems more like an eternity.
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Alternate Versions

On the 1992 VHS release of the film, the 1990 Walt Disney Pictures logo takes the place of the Buena Vista title card, so, the Buena Vista title card is placed after the film's ending instead. The Buena Vista title card fades to these 2 bumpers, "Coming to Home Video" and "Coming on Videocassette this Summer" which these 2 bumpers have the text "Walt Disney" from the 1986 Walt Disney Home Video logo. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Smurfs (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Kanine Krunchies
Written by Mel Leven
Performed by Lucille Bliss
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User Reviews

 
A new look
15 February 2000 | by SpleenSee all my reviews

A large part of Disney's triumph cannot be detected by the naked eye. His last animated film had been `Sleeping Beauty', which was the most extravagant and spectacular animated film of all time (excluding `Fantasia'). It wasn't a financial success. `101 Dalmatians', much less extravagant, was. In the two years between `Sleeping Beauty' and its successor there had been a revolution. The entire army of inkers who had carefully translated animators' pencil drawings into smooth, flowing lines were replaced by a machine that simply photocopied. This changed the character of animation so much that `Dalmatians' is almost the precise opposite of `Beauty'. Outlines are rough and black; the entire film looks decidedly drawn rather than painted, even the bits that are in fact painted; and the rich variety of colour of Disney's earlier films has been replaced with the stark white-with-black-spots coat of a dalmatian, with the occasional splash of startling red. The art directors were as determined to get the most out of the new technology as they had been to get the most out of the old technology.

And it has its own quiet extravagance. A title promising over one hundred spotted dogs was (probably still is) the kind of thing liable to make animators feel faint. It couldn't have been done without the photocopier; and even so, getting spots to stay in the right place on a featureless white background is a huge headache. None of this leaps out an audience. We simply see a hundred adorable dogs.

The story is simple, clean, civilised, and warm. It moves slowly but this doesn't matter. Preventing the film from becoming lethargic is Cruella de Vil. She can drive like a maniac through the snow, smoke a cigarette through a holder the length of a sword, wave her arms like a windmill ... yet she handles quiet determination and gritted teeth equally well. Character animation doesn't get any better than this.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 January 1961 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Walt Disney's 101 Dalmatians See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,389,226, 22 December 1985

Gross USA:

$144,880,014

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$215,880,014
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)| Dolby Stereo (1991 Re-Release)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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