7.3/10
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103 user 41 critic

The Great Train Robbery (1903)

A group of bandits stage a brazen train hold-up, only to find a determined posse hot on their heels.

Director:

Edwin S. Porter (uncredited)
Reviews
1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
A.C. Abadie A.C. Abadie ... Sheriff (uncredited)
Gilbert M. 'Broncho Billy' Anderson ... Bandit / Shot Passenger / Tenderfoot Dancer (uncredited)
George Barnes ... (uncredited)
Justus D. Barnes ... Bandit Who Fires at Camera (uncredited)
Walter Cameron Walter Cameron ... Sheriff (uncredited)
John Manus Dougherty Sr. John Manus Dougherty Sr. ... Fourth Bandit (uncredited)
Donald Gallaher ... Little Boy (uncredited)
Shadrack E. Graham Shadrack E. Graham ... Child (uncredited)
Frank Hanaway Frank Hanaway ... Bandit (uncredited)
Adam Charles Hayman Adam Charles Hayman ... Bandit (uncredited)
Morgan Jones Morgan Jones ... (uncredited)
Tom London ... Locomotive Engineer (uncredited)
Robert Milasch ... Trainman / Bandit (uncredited)
Marie Murray Marie Murray ... Dance-Hall Dancer (uncredited)
Frederick T. Scott Frederick T. Scott ... Man (uncredited)
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Storyline

Among the earliest existing films in American cinema - notable as an early film to present a narrative story to tell - it depicts a group of cowboy outlaws who hold up a train and rob the passengers. They are then pursued by a Sheriff's posse. Several scenes have color included - all hand tinted. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Action | Crime | Western

Certificate:

TV-G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film was selected into the National Film Registry in 1990 for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" See more »

Goofs

After the bandits have robbed the passengers they run towards the rear of the train instead of towards the front, where their getaway locomotive is waiting. In the next shot, they are seen running towards the locomotive. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Harmontown: A Four Day March to the Butt's Expanse (2012) See more »

User Reviews

Pioneer work possible birthplace of Western
30 July 1999 | by pooch-8See all my reviews

Arguably the first motion picture to employ the milieu of what would quickly become known as the Western genre, Edwin S. Porter's The Great Train Robbery was a smashing success with audiences (dozens of film history texts report with glee how viewers shrieked with fear and delight when a tightly-framed gunslinger pointed and fired directly at the camera) and made remarkable strides toward the establishment of longer, more narratively developed films. Porter's cutting was also among the most sophisticated to date, as multiple locations and events were suffused with a previously unseen urgency. Based on actual events, The Great Train Robbery ignited the imaginations of the scores who saw it -- making the movie one of the earliest examples of sensationalized, fictionalized screen adaptations taken from historical precedent.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

None | English

Release Date:

7 December 1903 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Great Train Robbery See more »

Filming Locations:

New Jersey, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$150 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(TCM print)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Color:

Black and White (hand-colored)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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