A group of astronomers go on an expedition to the Moon.

Director:

Georges Méliès (uncredited)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Victor André ... Astronomer (uncredited)
Bleuette Bernon Bleuette Bernon ... Lady in the Moon (uncredited)
Brunnet ... Astronomer (uncredited)
Jehanne d'Alcy Jehanne d'Alcy ... Secretary / Star / Rocket Attendant (uncredited)
Henri Delannoy Henri Delannoy ... Captain of the Rocket (uncredited)
Delpierre Delpierre ... Astronomer (uncredited)
Farjaux ... Astronomer (uncredited)
Kelm Kelm ... Astronomer (uncredited)
François Lallement François Lallement ... Officer of the Marines (uncredited)
Jules-Eugène Legris Jules-Eugène Legris ... Parade Leader (uncredited)
Georges Méliès ... Prof. Barbenfouillis / The Moon (uncredited)
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Storyline

An association of astronomers has convened to listen to the plan of Professor Barbenfouillis, their president, to fly to the moon. With the one dissenting voice quashed by Barbenfouillis and the other members, the plan is approved with Barbenfouillis choosing five others to accompany him. Most of the preparation for the trip is in building the vessel and launching mechanism, which resemble a large bullet and a large gun respectively. Hitting the moon in the eye, the six land safely at their destination. They find that much about the moon is wonderful and fantastical, but also that much is not what they would have liked to encounter as it is life threatening. They have to find a way to get out of their alien predicament to get back home safely. Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The band Smashing Pumpkins referenced the film in the music video for their 1996's song The Smashing Pumpkins: Tonight, Tonight (1996). The moon iconics scenes with the rocket in its eye appears, as well as the moon's inhabitants and other like the launch of the flight capsule from Earth to Moon. See more »

Goofs

A pendulum clock is visible within the spacecraft as the capsule is being readied for takeoff. A pendulum and the clock that it works depend upon gravitation for accurate time, so it will be worthless during the flight. The effects of gravitation were well known at the time.

Pocket watches then readily available were reliable enough. See more »

Alternate Versions

As with many silent films, there are multiple versions available. Many versions lack the "parade" sequence at the end of the feature, which was believed to be lost for quite some time. Some versions are in black and white while some are tinted or colorized. Additionally, some versions include narration (which can differ from print to print) while many are completely silent aside from the musical score. See more »

Connections

Featured in Independent Lens: Birth of a Movement (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Sonic Armada
(2011 Version)
Written by Jean-Benoît Dunckel and Nicolas Godin
Performed by Air
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User Reviews

George Melie's "A Trip to the Moon" welcomes a change in film making of the twentieth century.
8 May 2003 | by uoi_chickSee all my reviews

George Melies's `A Trip to the Moon' welcomes a change in film making of the twentieth century. Combined with live action as well as models, the movie tells a story about astronauts who take a trip to the moon. The moon, having a human face captures the astronauts after they crash into its eye. They later escape the moon and it's moon-men and make it back to earth safely. Melies wrote, directed and starred in this movie. He used many important techniques in his films to make them successful. Not only did he develop editing skills and superimposed images, he also used double exposure to complete the magic behind his films. Still used today, Melies's special effects, small models, painted backgrounds, weird makeup and costumes were just some of the important things used in the movie `A Trip to the Moon.'

For the filmmaker Melies, the use of stop action photography played an important role in `A Trip to the Moon.' He specialized in making objects vanish or change by stopping and restarting his camera. The use of self-painted sets, real people along with animated figures and the placement of real faces on objects helped this 1902 movie draw in his audience and leave them with many astonished looks.


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Details

Country:

France

Language:

None | French

Release Date:

4 October 1902 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A Trip to Mars See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

FRF30,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Star-Film See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| | | | (restored color)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Color:

Black and White | Color (hand-colored)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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