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'Vice' Enters the Oscar Race, Wins Praise for Christian Bale, Amy Adams at Early Screening

'Vice' Enters the Oscar Race, Wins Praise for Christian Bale, Amy Adams at Early Screening
One of the last shoes to drop in this year’s Oscar race, just dropped.

Annapurna skipped the Fall Festival circuit and decided instead to take over the Bruin Theatre in Westwood today to put Adam McKay’s Vice (just finished a couple of days ago) out to the world. Judging by the reaction to this afternoon’s unveiling you can probably expect to not only see nominations for stars Christian Bale who , for lack of a better word , simply inhabits Cheney , and Amy Adams , equally great as Lynne Cheney , but possibly several other categories including Best Picture.
See full article at Deadline »

John Williams Composed the Score for Disney’s 'Star Wars' Parks

John Williams Composed the Score for Disney’s 'Star Wars' Parks
John Williams may be finished with Star Wars after next year’s untitled Episode IX, but he’s not done yet.

The legendary composer, who’s brought his musical stylings to the space-opera franchise for more than 40 years, is providing an original score for the Star Wars–themed land known as Galaxy’s Edge that will open at Disney's theme parks in 2019.
See full article at Indiewire »

Friday Box Office: 'Fantastic Beasts 2' Conjures $25.7 Million

Friday Box Office: 'Fantastic Beasts 2' Conjures $25.7 Million
There’s no stopping the Harry Potter brand. The latest prequel to the Harry Potter series, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, pulled in a healthy $25.7 million on Friday, which includes the $9.1 million it made from Thursday night screenings.

The latest Fantastic Beasts movie is on track to pull in $60-63 million domestically, but it could really rack up the score internationally.
See full article at Collider.com »

‘Wife’ and ‘Widow’ Win Kolkata Festival Prizes

‘Wife’ and ‘Widow’ Win Kolkata Festival Prizes
Ash Mayfair’s Vietnamese film “The Third Wife” won best film at the 24th Kolkata international film festival’s international competition on Saturday. Mayfair’s debut feature previously won awards at Toronto, San Sebastian and Chicago. Mayfair was present to collect her award, presented by actress Tabu (“Life of Pi”) and filmmaker Shoojit Sircar.

Kolkata’s international competition is known for its generous prize money. Mayfair took home $71,000 for her win. Egyptian/Austrian filmmaker Abu Bakr Shawky won best director and a purse of $30,000 for “Yomeddine.” India’s Churni Ganguly won a jury special mention in the international competition for “A Timeline”, alongside Hungary’s Arpad Bogdan for “Genesis.”

Praveen Morchhale’s “Widow of Silence” won best film in Kolkata’s Indian competition. The film had its world premiere at Busan in October. Arijit Biswas won best director for “Sun Goes Around The Earth.”

Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Idfa Film Review: ‘Los Reyes’

Idfa Film Review: ‘Los Reyes’
In late 1965, Gay Talese set out to profile Frank Sinatra for Esquire magazine. Sinatra refused to be interviewed but allowed the writer to hang around, observing, which he did for three months, racking up almost $5,000 in expenses. In the end, Talese penned what became one of the most memorable celebrity profiles ever written, “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold,” proving in the process that sometimes the indirect approach can be more effective than the ostensibly candid, all-access interview.

A charmingly roundabout documentary born of curiosity, patience, and no small amount of inventiveness on the part of its authors, “Los Reyes” reminds me of that story. There’s no glamorous A-lister at its center. In fact, there are hardly any human characters to speak of. This unconventional nonfiction portrait takes place at the oldest skate park in Santiago, Chile, and was intended to feature the teenagers who congregate there regularly. But over
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Saturday Night Live’ Stages Mini ‘Office’ Reunion (Watch)

‘Saturday Night Live’ Stages Mini ‘Office’ Reunion (Watch)
It has been five years since “The Office” ended its run on NBC, and questions about a reboot are never far from minds when members of the cast are in the public eye. During Steve Carell’s Nov. 17 hosted episode of the Peacock’s late night sketch series, “Saturday Night Live,” he took the opportunity to fake out the audience with news of a reboot but instead delivered a partial reunion.

During Carell’s monologue, he took questions from the audience, including long-time “SNL” player Kenan Thompson and former “The Office” stars Jenna Fischer, Ellie Kemper and Ed Helms.

“It was a great experience,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Saturday Night Live’ Takes Shots at Voter Fraud, Facebook and Nancy Pelosi (Watch)

‘Saturday Night Live’ Takes Shots at Voter Fraud, Facebook and Nancy Pelosi (Watch)
The midterm elections were held two weeks ago, and as votes are still being counted in some parts of the country, voter fraud is still a hot topic. “Saturday Night Live” got in on the discussion with its Nov. 17 episode cold open that saw Kate McKinnon return to “The Ingraham Angle” desk as Laura Ingraham. But the sketch hardly stopped there — also taking shots at Facebook, Nancy Pelosi and the Vape God, who Kinnon as Ingraham pointed out was “a real person I had on my show.”

McKinnon as Ingraham started the sketch by claiming rampant voter fraud “allowed Democrats to literally steal the election.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘SNL': Kate McKinnon’s Laura Ingraham Wants You To Know That ‘If You Have Less Than Five Guns, You’re Gay’ (Video)

‘SNL': Kate McKinnon’s Laura Ingraham Wants You To Know That ‘If You Have Less Than Five Guns, You’re Gay’ (Video)
The cold open sketch on this week’s “SNL” saw Kate McKinnon once again portray Fox News host Laura Ingraham on her show “The Ingraham Angle.” This time the ersatz Ingraham brought back Cecily Strong as “Judge” Jeanine Pirro, as well as Leslie Jones playing Democratic congresswoman Marcia Fudge and Pete Davidson as someone called the Vape God.

McKinnon’s Ingraham kicked off her show by bemoaning the fact that celebrities are “whining” about the wildfires in California while “our president is being attacked by rain” — a reference to Trump’s recent trip to France in which he opted out of a World War I memorial ceremony.

Then, Ingraham took issue with the idea that white women rebelled against republican leadership in the midterm elections — instead, she said, the issue is that all Latinos voted multiple times.

“You can’t dismiss that idea simply because it isn’t true and sounds insane,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Vice’ Screens for Critics; Now, Christian Bale and Amy Adams Will Vie For Awards

‘Vice’ Screens for Critics; Now, Christian Bale and Amy Adams Will Vie For Awards
Finally, Adam McKay’s long-awaited “Vice” screened for the press on Saturday, November 17. It’s one of the last major screenings of the 2019 Oscar candidates, but but sometimes the best are saved for last.

On November 5, 2016, Paramount screened Denzel Washington’s “Fences” at a packed Westwood screening, followed by a short Q&A with the director and cast. Viola Davis went on to win Best Supporting Actress at SAG, the Golden Globes, and the BAFTAs on the way to her first Oscar. Paramount debuted “The Big Short” November 12, 2015 as closing night of the AFI Fest. It went on to receive five Oscar nominations with McKay and Charles Randolph’s adapted screenplay taking BAFTA, WGA, and the Oscar.

So now we have McKay’s follow-up, and anticipation is high. Financed by Annapurna, the movie is set to hit theaters December 25. And at the packed Westwood screening for guilds and awards press,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Shadow,’ ‘Elephant’ Take Top Honors at Politically-Tinged Golden Horse Awards

‘Shadow,’ ‘Elephant’ Take Top Honors at Politically-Tinged Golden Horse Awards
The atmosphere on stage at the Golden Horse film awards ceremony in Taiwan on Saturday was politically-tinged. But the destination of the top prizes, at the event usually considered as the most prestigious for Chinese-language cinema, was largely predictable.

Powerful period drama, “Shadow” was the numerical winner, taking home four prizes, including best director for Zhang Yimou. “Shadow” had been the clear favorite, going in to the ceremony 12 nominations.

“An Elephant Sitting Still,” was named as best film and the audience award winner. The prize for best adapted screenplay was posthumously awarded to its mainland Chinese writer-director Hu Bo, who committed suicide in October last year, shortly after completing the movie. “Elephant” will now be entitled to a release in Taiwan, bypassing the island’s annual quota on mainland Chinese films.

Three other films won three prizes each: Taiwan’s “Dear Ex” won best actress (Hsieh Yin Xuan), best song
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Awkwafina, Moon So-ri, ‘Bethany Hamilton’ Take Hawaii Festival Prizes

Awkwafina, Moon So-ri, ‘Bethany Hamilton’ Take Hawaii Festival Prizes
Breakout acting star Awkwafina was on hand Saturday in Honolulu to receive the Halekulani Maverick Award from the Hawaii International Film Festival. The actress, writer and rapper this year starred in “Ocean’s 8” and “Crazy Rich Asians.” Japanese actor, Takumi Saito was also given a maverick award after his feature directing debut “Blank 13.”

Leading Korean actress Moon So-ri received a career achievement award. Moon recently directed the feature-length omnibus “The Running Actress.”

The festival presented its Best Made In Hawaii feature prize to “Bethany Hamilton: Unstoppable,” directed by Aaron Lieber. The jurors also awarded a second place award to “Moananuiakea: One Ocean, One Canoe, One People,” directed by Na’alehu Anthony. The Made in Hawaii jury called “Hamilton” “emotional and inspiring.” It said: “this film did what all great docs do – it captured defining moments you can’t believe were captured on film with twists and turns that defied expectations.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald’ – That Crazy Twist Ending, Explained

‘Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald’ – That Crazy Twist Ending, Explained
(Huge spoilers here for “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” below. You have been warned.)

So here you are. You’ve experienced all the craziness that “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” had in store. And you’re totally confused by all of it because, well, it’s a whole lot of information to absorb.

But it is what it is, and what it is can be really tough to digest — especially if you aren’t steeped in “Harry Potter” lore. And even if you are a lifelong Potterhead it might take a minute for all of it to sink in because of how much lore this new “Fantastic Beasts” movie is dropping on us.

So regardless of what level of “Harry Potter” fandom you’re one, we’re here to help you by distilling down the major revelations in a way that’s perhaps easier to understand than it was in the movie.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Village Rockstars’ Director Says Her Acting Struggles Helped Her Oscar Contending Film

‘Village Rockstars’ Director Says Her Acting Struggles Helped Her Oscar Contending Film
A version of this story about “Village Rockstars” first appeared in the Foreign Language Issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

Village Rockstars,” a lyrical film by Rima Das, plays out like a less raucous version of “The Florida Project” transplanted to the small Indian village of Chhaygaon, where kids carve musical instruments out of Styrofoam and dream of stardom.

The film is India’s entry in this year’s Oscar foreign-language race, and this interview is one in a series of conversations TheWrap is having with the foreign directors in contention.

Also Read: Oscars Foreign Language Race 2018: Complete List of Submissions

How did you come of this story?

Rima Das I grew up in that village. For a couple of years, I was living in Mumbai, and when I was back in my village shooting my first film I met these children in the village. And they taught me how to unlearn.
See full article at The Wrap »

Why Kosovo’s Gay Rights Film ‘The Marriage’ Shocked Its Own Director When It Was Released

Why Kosovo’s Gay Rights Film ‘The Marriage’ Shocked Its Own Director When It Was Released
A version of this story about “The Marriage” first appeared in the Foreign Language Issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

The Marriage,” the first feature from award-winning shorts director Blerta Zeqiri, is a love triangle of sorts between a couple who are about to be married and the groom-to-be’s gay lover, who returns to Kosovo and stirs up old but repressed feelings.

The film is Kosovo’s entry in this year’s Oscar foreign-language race, and this interview is one of a series of conversations TheWrap is having with the foreign directors.

Also Read: Oscars Foreign Language Race 2018: Complete List of Submissions

When we spoke in 2013, you said that you and your husband were writing a film about gay rights in Kosovo. Is this that film?

Blerta Zeqiri Yeah, it took us this many years to write it because I wanted to do the film with improvisations, the
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscars: Christian Bale Leaps Into the Lead Actor Race With Adam McKay’s Sobering ‘Vice’

Oscars: Christian Bale Leaps Into the Lead Actor Race With Adam McKay’s Sobering ‘Vice’
’Tis the season for latter-year revelations. With Adam McKay’s new film “Vice,” a follow-up to his 2015 Oscar winner “The Big Short,” a major one has landed, though it’s hardly a surprise: Christian Bale might be in line to receive his second Academy Award to date, for his uncanny portrayal of former Vice President Dick Cheney.

Any glance at the film’s trailer made it clear that the 44-year-old actor, who previously won the supporting actor prize for 2010’s “The Fighter,” had undergone one of his famous transformations for this production, packing on the pounds, shaving back his hair, sporting makeup effects to bridge the gaps between actor and portly politico. It was a true immersion. I talked to him on Variety’s “Playback” podcast the day after he wrapped nearly a year ago, in fact, and he was happy to shake the lingering effects of the performance at the time.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Governors Awards: By Honoring Marvin Levy, the Academy Recognizes Its Debt to PR Experts

No industry has ever created a more effective public relations and marketing device for itself than Hollywood did when — with the financial backing of the studio chiefs and the help of public relations and marketing specialists — it created the Academy Awards some 90 years ago.

People the world over don't simultaneously tune in to find out what Detroit deems the year's best cars or Vegas views as the year's best casinos or Washington regards as the year's top politicians. But, even in years when a relatively small portion of the public has seen the ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Peterloo’ Dp Dick Pope on the Making of a Massacre

Cinematographer Dick Pope has collaborated with iconic director Mike Leigh for over two decades and set out to apply their unique approach to filming to the story of the 1819 British massacre of demonstrators known to history as Peterloo. A study of workers, factory owners, the clergy and the crown, whose conflicting interests build to a brutal bloodbath on St. Peter’s Field in Manchester, the film represented the greatest technical challenge Pope has faced, he says.

Competing for the Golden Frog at EnergaCamerimage and shot at historic locations, the production was built up from a focus on actors and performances as its foundation, says Pope, an approach he and Leigh have used throughout their collaboration on films including “Naked,” “Vera Drake” and “Mr. Turner.”

You’ve been on juries here at EnergaCamerimage more than once. What do you notice in different choices younger cinematographers are making?

I do find in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Alfonso Cuaron Thrived on Chaos When He Shot His Own Memories for ‘Roma’

Alfonso Cuaron Thrived on Chaos When He Shot His Own Memories for ‘Roma’
Alfonso Cuaron, who won an Oscar for directing 2013’s “Gravity,” is back in the awards conversation again this year with a very different kind of film, “Roma,” a clearly autobiographical tale that follows the life of a middle-class family in Mexico City in the early 70s. “Roma” is notable for its uncompromising art-house esthetics, its meticulous restoration of Mexico City’s Roma neighborhood, and its widely praised black-and-white cinematography, which Cuaron created himself as his own Dp. He had originally intended to shoot the film with longtime collaborator Emmanuel Lubezki, known as Chivo, but then the Dp became unavailable.

What’s the story behind you serving as your own Dp for “Roma?”

Chivo started prepping with me. I designed this film for him – the bastard! (laughs) Chivo and I have always had conversations about what are the biggest obstacles to making a good film, and pretty much everything boils down to time.
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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