Paul Schrader’s Last Stand: How a 70-Year-Old Titan of American Cinema Is Fighting to Stay Relevant

Paul Schrader’s Last Stand: How a 70-Year-Old Titan of American Cinema Is Fighting to Stay Relevant
Paul Schrader has the outsized personality of a cigar-chomping studio mogul, the soul of a cinephile, and the Diy filmmaking ethos of a millennial. His career stretches back decades, but he never stops living in the moment.

He wrote “Taxi Driver” 40 years ago, kickstarting a collaborating with Martin Scorsese that continued with “Raging Bull,” “The Last Temptation of Christ,” and “Bringing Out the Dead.” The former film critic also has forged his own path as a director, with seminal portraits of intense masculinity like “American Gigolo,” “Affliction” and the astonishing epic “Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters.” He’s never really slowed down.

His latest movie, “Dog Eat Dog,” might not look like the work of a veteran director. A wacky, discursive adaptation of Eddie Bunker’s 1995 novel (scripted by Matthew David Wilder), it takes the elements of a grimy heist movie and turns them inside out.

Read More: ‘Dog Eat Dog
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