Movie News

‘Joy’ by Sudabeh Mortezai Wins Best Film at BFI London Film Festival

  • Variety
‘Joy’ by Sudabeh Mortezai Wins Best Film at BFI London Film Festival
Sex-trafficking drama “Joy,” from Austrian-Iranian director Sudabeh Mortezai, has won the award for Best Film at the BFI London Film Festival. “Joy” was one of 10 films in the official competition lineup, half of which were directed or co-directed by women, including Mortezai.

The winning picture is a “vital, beautifully made film,” said Lenny Abrahamson, president of the main competition jury. “’Joy’ is a provocative and unique film offering a devastating portrait of human resilience in the most inhuman of environments.”

In its review, Variety said the movie was a “fully inhabited portrayal of Nigerian migrant sex workers,” adding that “it offers a raw, fresh view on the currently ubiquitous topic of European immigration control, sewn through with sharp feminist perspective.”

“Joy’s” London accolade comes after it won the Hearst Film Award for female direction and the 2018 Europa Cinemas Label at Venice.

Lukas Dhont’s “Girl,” about a transgender teen
See full article at Variety »

Box Office: ‘Halloween’ to Hunt Down October Opening Record With $80 Million Debut

  • Variety
Box Office: ‘Halloween’ to Hunt Down October Opening Record With $80 Million Debut
Halloween” will not only take home the box office crown in its debut weekend, but may also break “Venom’s” recently-set record for best October opening of all time.

Universal’s reboot, starring Jamie Lee Curtis, is heading for an estimated $80 million from 3,928 North American locations in its first weekend. It’ll have to outpace “Venom’s” $80.255 million opening three weeks ago to beat the October record.
See full article at Variety »

‘Halloween’ Stalks ‘Venom’ and October Box Office Opening Record

  • The Wrap
‘Halloween’ Stalks ‘Venom’ and October Box Office Opening Record
It was just two weeks ago that “Venom” set a new October box office record for the biggest opening weekend with $80 million. Now, Michael Myers might slice that record to pieces as Universal/Blumhouse’s “Halloween” is closing in on a $80 million record.

Early estimates have the sequel to John Carpenter’s classic slasher earning a $79 million opening after making $33.3 million on Friday from 3,928 theaters, including $7.7 million from Thursday previews. Impressively, unlike “Venom,” “Halloween” is reaching that figure without the extra bump of premium formats like IMAX. If Saturday results can beat expectations, it may be able to crack the $80 million mark.

Even if it doesn’t, this will be by far the best opening weekend for a Blumhouse release, topping the $52.5 million for “Paranormal Activity 3.” The film has earned a B+ on CinemaScore to go with its 85 percent Rotten Tomatoes score and is expected to leg out to
See full article at The Wrap »

'Joy' wins top prize at 2018 BFI London Film Festival

'Joy' wins top prize at 2018 BFI London Film Festival
Sudabeh Mortezai's Joy, a drama about a Nigerian woman trying to make a new life for herself and her daughter in Vienna, was presented with the best film award of the Official Competition at the BFI London Film Festival on Saturday October 20.

Jury chief Lenny Abrahamson said: "[Joy is] a raw, fresh view on sex trafficking with a sharp feminist perspective sewn in throughout… a vital, beautifully made film that my fellow jurors and I urge you to watch."
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Hillary Clinton Chooses Sides in Vin Diesel vs Dwayne Johnson Debate (Video)

  • The Wrap
Hillary Clinton Chooses Sides in Vin Diesel vs Dwayne Johnson Debate (Video)
Hillary Clinton has weighed in on the Fast and Furious debate: team Vin Diesel or team Dwayne Johnson?

In a tongue-and-cheek segment on Friday’s "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert," staff members were given the opportunity to ask the former Secretary of State and presidential candidate one question. "Late Show" writer "John" asked her opinion on the Fate of the Furious co-stars.

Clinton’s answer was unsurprisingly diplomatic.
See full article at The Wrap »

'Silly question!' Mike Leigh interviewed by our readers and famous fans

The acclaimed director talks to Tim Lewis about his new film, Peterloo, and, further down, answers questions about creative freedom, beards, James Bond - and what Rada didn’t teach him

Mike Leigh sits before me, in his Soho office, a man without regrets – certainly with regard to his work, but probably in most aspects of his life, one suspects. If this doesn’t make him unique in the film industry, then he’s certainly in a tiny minority. The 75-year-old British director has made 20-odd films – from his TV work in the 1970s up to his latest release, Peterloo, perhaps his most ambitious and certainly his most expensive project yet – and he has never once had his arm twisted to compromise on his creative vision. He chooses the subject, handpicks the actors and the version we see on the screen is exactly the one that Leigh intended.

“I’m
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Actor Scott Wilson of ‘The Walking Dead’ Remembered at Memorial

Actor Scott Wilson of ‘The Walking Dead’ Remembered at Memorial
Scott Wilson, an acting veteran of half a century who was a high-profile member “The Walking Dead” cast, was remembered warmly at memorial ceremonies Saturday at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills.

Wilson died at the age of 76 after a battle with leukemia on Oct. 6. The premiere episode of the ninth season of “The Walking Dead” aired the next day and was dedicated to Wilson’s memory.

The Walking Dead” cast members Danai Gurira, Norman Reedus, Sarah Wayne Callies and Greg Nicotero spoke at Saturday’s event along with director Ernest Dickerson. Gurira recalled in her speech that Wilson went out of his way to make her feel comfortable on her first day when she joined the cast of “The Walking Dead” in its third season.

“Scott made me feel like part of the family as soon as I met him,” she said. “He also taught me to how to smoke a cigar.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rome Mia: New Italian Cinema Standouts Comprise Female-Led Western ‘My Body Will Bury You’ (Exclusive)

Rome Mia: New Italian Cinema Standouts Comprise Female-Led Western ‘My Body Will Bury You’ (Exclusive)
Four female Italian bandits known as “Le Drude” are the protagonists of “My Body Will Bury You” a Sicily-set revenge drama/Western set in 1860 that is among standout titles presented to prospective buyers and sales agents during the Rome Mia market’s What’s Next Italy showcase.

This second feature by Alessandro La Parola, whose bittersweet comedy debut “E se domani” won some prizes and critical accolades, is loosely based on the director’s research about the period when Garibaldi in his effort to unify Italy invaded Sicily, then a lawless territory where gangs of female rebels formed. Footage of the film (pictured) revealed a genre-bender that mixes period costumer, Western, and action tropes. The trigger-happy killer among the four fierce women — who have joined forces to avenge cruelties that they, and others, have been subjected to — is played by Sicilian actress Margareth Made who emerged in Giuseppe Tornatore’s “Baaria.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Halloween review – a slasher classic you just can’t kill off

New hands are at the helm for a knowingly intelligent reboot of the 1978 masterpiece

In his brilliant turn-of-the-century documentary The American Nightmare, Adam Simon located John Carpenter’s 1978 Halloween as the end point of a decade of countercultural horror movies. Starting with George Romero’s 1968 Night of the Living Dead, Simon unpicked the rebellious socio-political threads of films such as Last House on the Left, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and Shivers before arriving at the more conservative inflections of Carpenter’s ruthlessly efficient modern morality tale.

A stylishly suspenseful thriller in which teenagers indulging in illicit sex and intoxication are stalked and slashed by a relentless killer, Halloween was a funhouse ride with a puritanical narrative edge. Yet it also had a punky power that inspired a slew of titillating teen-terror slashers. Friday the 13th may have lifted its gory riffs from Mario Bava’s A Bay of Blood
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Julio Medem’s ‘The Tree of Blood’ Picked up by FilmSharks Intl. (Exclusive)

Julio Medem’s ‘The Tree of Blood’ Picked up by FilmSharks Intl. (Exclusive)
Starring “La casa de papel’s” Ursula Corberó, “The Tree of Blood,” the latest movie from Spain’s Julio Medem, is being brought onto the international market at Rome’s Mia market by FilmSharks Intl., which has acquired world sales rights.

FilmSharks Intl. will continue introducing the film to buyers at the American Film Market, which opens Oct. 31 in Santa Monica.

The deal was negotiated by FilmSharks Intl.’s Guido Rud and Sandra Tapia, Ignasi Estapé and Ibon Cormenzana at the film’s lead producer Arcadia Motion Pictures (Amp).

A romantic thriller which Diamond Films Spain will release in Spain on Nov. 1 on over 200 locations, said FilmSharks’ Guido Rud, “The Tree of Blood” (El Arbol de la Sangre) marks the latest movie from the Cormenzana-founded, and the ninth fiction feature of Medem, a director whose debut, 1991’s “Vacas,” helped bring down the flag on the modern Spanish cinema through
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Halloween’ Magic: How a Slasher Flick Redefined a Genre and Became One of the Decade’s Most Important Films

‘Halloween’ Magic: How a Slasher Flick Redefined a Genre and Became One of the Decade’s Most Important Films
Exactly 40 years after John Carpenter’s “Halloween” was released in 1978, David Gordon Green released his modern-day sequel to an estimated $75 million opening weekend. It has the benefit of strong reviews, original star Jamie Lee Curtis’ return to the lead role, and its placement as this year’s holiday horror film release — but it was never just a horror film. This ultra low-budget slasher flick was one of the most important movies to be released in the 1970s.

Among the top-grossing films released in 1978, “Halloween” was no. 10. However, those that did better — “Grease,” “Superman,” “Animal House,” “Every Which Way You Can,” “Heaven Can Wait,” “Hooper,” “Jaws 2,” “Revenge of the Pink Panther,” and “The Deer Hunter” — may be unfamiliar to anyone 40 or younger. Even last weekend, which would be week 2,036 of release, “Halloween” remains vital in the public consciousness: It grossed $9,553 last weekend.

Adjusted to 2018 prices, the 1978 independent film made $184 million
See full article at Indiewire »

Danny Leiner, Director of ‘Dude, Where’s My Car,’ Dies at 57

Danny Leiner, Director of ‘Dude, Where’s My Car,’ Dies at 57
Danny Leiner, a film and television director whose feature films included “Dude, Where’s My Car” and “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle,” died Thursday. He was 57.

Leiner’s collaborator Ross Putman confirmed his death in a Facebook post, and described its cause as a long illness.

“If there’s one thing I can say about Danny the professional, it’s that he refused to let us settle for anything less than our best. He pushed us to do what he knew we were capable of,” Putman wrote.

“Harold & Kumar” stars John Cho and Kal Penn also remembered Leiner on Twitter.

“Danny was so sharp, so funny, and a great dinner companion. To his friends and family, my deepest condolences,” wrote Cho.

“He was such a funny, thoughtful, encouraging person,” Penn tweeted.

I am so saddened to hear about the passing of Danny Leiner, who became my friend when
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Pop Culture Review: ‘Luke Cage’ Cancelled, ‘The Flash’ Movie Delayed Again, and More

Welcome back to The Collider Pop Culture Review, in which Collider’s weekend editor Vinnie Mancuso wakes up only slightly hungover on a Saturday to rate the week’s biggest stories in film and television on a scale from 1 to 10. This week: Netflix's McU is imploding after Luke Cage gets cancelled, The Flash movie starring Ezra Miller is probably never going to happen, Spider-Man: Far From Home filming is donezo, and much more. …
See full article at Collider.com »

‘Sicario: Day of The Soldado’ Director Stefano Sollima on the Importance of Authenticity and Real Locations [Interview]

‘Sicario: Day of The Soldado’ Director Stefano Sollima on the Importance of Authenticity and Real Locations [Interview]
With Sicario: Day of The Soldado, director Stefano Sollima roughened the edges of screenwriter Taylor Sheridan‘s potential trilogy. With Kate Macy (Emily Blunt) no longer around, Sollima felt Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro) and Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) unleashed naturally meant things would turn bleaker. A crowd-pleasing thriller Sollima’s sequel is not, and nor should it be. It’s a suitably bleak […]

The post ‘Sicario: Day of The Soldado’ Director Stefano Sollima on the Importance of Authenticity and Real Locations [Interview] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘My Dinner With Hervé’ Review: Peter Dinklage’s Bland HBO Biopic Never Justifies Breaking Bread With Two Bad Men

‘My Dinner With Hervé’ Review: Peter Dinklage’s Bland HBO Biopic Never Justifies Breaking Bread With Two Bad Men
Hervé Villechaize, the artist best known for playing Nick Nack in “The Man With the Golden Gun” and Tattoo on the TV show “Fantasy Island,” may have been a decent man. With just a rudimentary bit of research, one can see that Villechaize worked extensively with troubled children, helping abuse victims cope with tragedy and speaking with depressed teenagers about suicide. Certainly as a performer, the famous dwarf knew how to entertain the masses, even going so far as to play Oscar the Grouch on “Sesame Street.”

To its credit, “My Dinner With Hervé” doesn’t embellish these details to create an overly rosy interpretation of a troubled man. But to its pressing detriment, the new HBO biopic downplays any empathetic characteristics whatsoever, to the point where viewers may wonder why this actor was notable at all. Sure, he was famous for a spell, but in a movie that damns
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Joy’ by Sudabeh Mortezai Wins Best Film at BFI London Film Festival

‘Joy’ by Sudabeh Mortezai Wins Best Film at BFI London Film Festival
Sex-trafficking drama “Joy,” from Austrian-Iranian director Sudabeh Mortezai, has won the award for Best Film at the BFI London Film Festival. “Joy” was one of 10 films in the official competition lineup, half of which were directed or co-directed by women, including Mortezai.

The winning picture is a “vital, beautifully made film,” said Lenny Abrahamson, president of the main competition jury. “’Joy’ is a provocative and unique film offering a devastating portrait of human resilience in the most inhuman of environments.”

In its review, Variety said the movie was a “fully inhabited portrayal of Nigerian migrant sex workers,” adding that “it offers a raw, fresh view on the currently ubiquitous topic of European immigration control, sewn through with sharp feminist perspective.”

“Joy’s” London accolade comes after it won the Hearst Film Award for female direction and the 2018 Europa Cinemas Label at Venice.

Lukas Dhont’s “Girl,” about a transgender teen
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Trafficking drama Joy wins best film award at London film festival

Jury calls director Sudabeh Mortezai’s film a ‘devastating portrait of resilience’

Joy, a “raw, fresh view” of sex trafficking across Europe, has scooped the London film festival’s award for best film. The drama, from the Austrian director Sudabeh Mortezai, follows the difficult life of a young Nigerian woman, Joy, who works on the street to pay off her debts and support her family back home.

The winner, recipient of this year’s bronze Star of London award, was announced on Saturday night in Leicester Square in front of a crowd of cinema fans before a special surprise screening of the winning film was staged.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle’ Director Danny Leiner Dies at 57

‘Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle’ Director Danny Leiner Dies at 57
Danny Leiner, who directed two stoner classics in “Dude, Where’s My Car?” and “Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle,” has died at 57 after “a long illness.” Ross Putnam, who produced several films with Leiner, announced the news on Facebook. “If there’s one thing I can say about Danny the professional, it’s that he refused to let us settle for anything less than our best,” Putman wrote in his post.

“He pushed us to do what he knew we were capable of. Danny the person was sardonic, sharp, and savvy, with a love for culture and comedy of all kinds. It hasn’t really sunk in yet, but the world has lost a good one.”

Born May 13, 1961, Leiner graduated from Suny Purchase and made his feature debut in 1996 with “Layin’ Low.”

Kal Penn and John Cho, who starred in “Harold and Kumar” and its two sequels, reacted
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Little Drummer Girl’ Trailer: A New British Spy Series to Obsess Over

A couple of years ago, BBC One and AMC made waves with The Night Manager, an adaptation of author John le Carré‘s spy novel. Those networks saw the success of that show and jumped in on another le Carré adaptation, a 1970s-set thriller called The Little Drummer Girl. Oldboy director Chan-Wook Park marks his first entry […]

The post ‘The Little Drummer Girl’ Trailer: A New British Spy Series to Obsess Over appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Stanley Kubrick never paid for my early work as a composer, childhood friend reveals

Gerald Fried, who scored five of the director’s films, on the auteur’s insecurities as a boy and demanding working methods

They were childhood friends who collaborated on five films, including one of cinema’s most powerful anti-war movies, Paths of Glory. But Stanley Kubrick refused to pay Gerald Fried for the music he wrote for their first film, the composer has now revealed.

That film was the 1951 Day of the Fight, a short documentary following a day in the life of middleweight Irish boxer Walter Cartier.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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