Indie News

Boots Riley Criticizes Spike Lee’s Portrayal of Cops in ‘BlacKkKlansman,’ Calls the Real Ron Stallworth a ‘Villain’

Boots Riley Criticizes Spike Lee’s Portrayal of Cops in ‘BlacKkKlansman,’ Calls the Real Ron Stallworth a ‘Villain’
For the second time this week, “Sorry to Bother You” director Boots Riley has taken issue with “BlacKkKlansman.” Spike Lee’s latest is among the most well-received films of the year, even winning the Grand Prix at Cannes in May, and though Riley praises the “masterful craftwork” he nevertheless felt compelled to write what he calls a “political critique of the content and timing” of the film.

At the center of that critique is the fact that “BlacKkKlansman” is “being pushed as a true story and it is precisely its untrue elements that make a cop a hero against racism.” The film tells the story of Ron Stallworth, a black police officer who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan.

“It’s a made up story in which the false parts of it to try to make a cop the protagonist in the fight against racist oppression,” Riley argues. “It’s being
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Box Office: Kevin Spacey's 'Billionaire Boys Club' Earns Abysmal $126 on Opening Day

Box Office: Kevin Spacey's 'Billionaire Boys Club' Earns Abysmal $126 on Opening Day
Disgraced actor Kevin Spacey is enduring a career low at the box office this weekend.

The ensemble crime-drama Billionaire Boys Club quietly opened Friday in 10 theaters scattered in select states across the U.S. The indie film earned an abysmal $126 for the day following its release on premium VOD last month, according to those with access to theater grosses.

Put another way, that's a per location average of $12.60, which doesn't even equal two tickets if going by the current average ticket price of $9.27. For the full weekend, Billionaire Boys Club could have trouble hitting ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Finnish Metal Horror Flick Heavy Trip Gets Theatrical and VOD Dates

Finnish Metal Horror Flick Heavy Trip Gets Theatrical and VOD Dates
Now that it’s done playing the festival circuit, Doppelgänger Releasing and Bloody-Disgusting will be releasing Heavy Trip, the first film in their joint venture, in limited theaters as well as VOD platforms this October. The film will be hitting five cities on October 5 before expanding to more cities on October 10. It then hits […]

The post Finnish Metal Horror Flick Heavy Trip Gets Theatrical and VOD Dates appeared first on Dread Central.
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‘Madeline’s Madeline’ & ‘Skate Kitchen’ Are Two Damn Good Indie Films From Female Directors [Adjust Your Tracking]

‘Madeline’s Madeline’ & ‘Skate Kitchen’ Are Two Damn Good Indie Films From Female Directors [Adjust Your Tracking]
Yet another reason why we need more feminine filmmaking voices…

On this episode of Adjust Your Tracking, Joe and I come of age (yet again) and put ourselves into a female perspective with indie releases ‘Madeline’s Madeline‘ and “Skate Kitchen.” Those films are slowly rolling out to arthouse theaters this month and soon after on VOD. And you should really pay attention to them and watch!

Continue reading ‘Madeline’s Madeline’ & ‘Skate Kitchen’ Are Two Damn Good Indie Films From Female Directors [Adjust Your Tracking] at The Playlist.
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Kevin Spacey’s ‘Billionaire Boys Club’ Dumped on Just 10 Screens – Probably Not at a Theater Near You

Kevin Spacey’s ‘Billionaire Boys Club’ Dumped on Just 10 Screens – Probably Not at a Theater Near You
Billionaire Boys Club,” a fact-based thriller whose theatrical release was thrown into doubt after the sexual misconduct accusations against star Kevin Spacey last fall, opened on Friday — but on just 10 screens nationwide.

The film, whose cast includes rising stars like Ansel Elgort, Taron Egerton, Billie Lourd and Emma Roberts, is mostly skipping major markets for places like Solon, Ohio, Chalmette, La. and Pompano Beach, Florida.

You can see it tonight in Brooklyn at Coney Island Avenue’s Kent Theater at 10 p.m. If you live in Southern California, you missed your shot — it already played its lone Friday showing at Riverside’s Galaxy Mission Grove 18 at 9:30 a.m, according to Fandango.

Also Read: Robin Wright Breaks Silence on Kevin Spacey: 'I Didn't Know the Man, I Knew the Craftsman' (Video)

In June, indie distributor Vertical Entertainment pledged to move forward with a domestic theatrical release of the film — a
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Juliet, Naked’: Rose Byrne on Turning Nick Hornby’s Book About Two Men Into the Story of One Smart Woman

‘Juliet, Naked’: Rose Byrne on Turning Nick Hornby’s Book About Two Men Into the Story of One Smart Woman
There’s no one actually named Juliet in Jesse Peretz’s “Juliet, Naked,” but the new Nick Hornby adaptation does hinge on the disarming performance of its leading lady: Rose Byrne as Annie, a woman trapped between two very different men. First, there’s her long-time boyfriend Duncan (Chris O’Dowd), a normal enough guy defined by his one unique trait, a decades-long obsession with indie rocker Tucker Crowe (Ethan Hawke).

Based on the 2009 Hornby novel of the same name, “Juliet, Naked” presents a familiar figure in Duncan, calling to mind the similar Hornby protagonists of “About A Boy” and “High Fidelity”: an infantile aesthete who seems to think that being creepily knowledgeable about another person’s art is a suitable stand-in for having his own life. When the film opens, Annie is struggling with her own kind of mid-life crisis. She’s lived in the same small town for too long,
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Locarno Filmmakers Academy 2018: Meet Some of the World’s Most Exciting New Filmmakers

  • Indiewire
Locarno Filmmakers Academy 2018: Meet Some of the World’s Most Exciting New Filmmakers
The following article was produced as part of the 2018 Locarno Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the Locarno Film Festival.

The annual Filmmakers Academy at the Locarno Festival in Switzerland selects some of the most promising talents in contemporary film from around the world, offering them vital networking opportunities, screenings at the festival for their existing short films, and masterclasses with a line-up of guest directors. This year’s talks from established filmmakers included musings from Bruno Dumont and festival jurors Jia Zhangke and Sean Baker.

During the festival, five participants spoke about their work to date, their aspirations, how the conditions for filmmaking in their home countries have informed their career progress so far, and what they expect to do next.

Carolina Markowicz

Based in and originally from São Paulo, Brazil, Carolina Markowicz has written and directed five short films to date. “Tatuapé
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“Even Before It’s a Vision, It’s a Need”: Director Jeremiah Zagar Talks the Creative Process and his New We the Animals

“I will do everything you do.” Filmmaker Jeremiah Zagar (In a Dream) dubs that his motto, his ethos, while on set. And when you watch his simultaneously epic and beautifully specific film We the Animals, it will come as no surprise that Zagar created for his collaborators such a collaborative, safe space for taking risks. Premiering at Sundance Film Festival this year where it won the Next Innovator award, it’s the first narrative feature for Zagar. His documentarian’s eye combined with his ability to draw vulnerable and vibrant performances from his cast creates sparkling portrait of three young boys discovering […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“Even Before It’s a Vision, It’s a Need”: Director Jeremiah Zagar Talks the Creative Process and his New We the Animals

“I will do everything you do.” Filmmaker Jeremiah Zagar (In a Dream) dubs that his motto, his ethos, while on set. And when you watch his simultaneously epic and beautifully specific film We the Animals, it will come as no surprise that Zagar created for his collaborators such a collaborative, safe space for taking risks. Premiering at Sundance Film Festival this year where it won the Next Innovator award, it’s the first narrative feature for Zagar. His documentarian’s eye combined with his ability to draw vulnerable and vibrant performances from his cast creates sparkling portrait of three young boys discovering […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Stranger Things’ Season 3 Is Inspired by a Chevy Chase Comedy, According to David Harbour

‘Stranger Things’ Season 3 Is Inspired by a Chevy Chase Comedy, According to David Harbour
Stranger Things” has always worn its influences on its sleeves, and season three will be no different. David Harbour, who’s received two Emmy nods for his work on Netflix’s throwback drama, tells Variety in a new interview that the next go-round will be inspired by the 1985 comedy “Fletch.”

“The Duffers are so specific each year with the movies,” he says. “And ‘Fletch’ is one movie we get to play around and have some fun with this season, which you wouldn’t expect from ‘Stranger Things’ and you wouldn’t expect from the Spielberg universe and you certainly wouldn’t expect from a darker season.’” Set in the ’80s, “Stranger Things” has made numerous references to the movies and TV shows that have inspired it, from “The Goonies” and “Alien” to “Stand by Me” and “Ghostbusters.”

Chevy Chase stars in the film as Irwin “Fletch” Fletcher, an investigative reporter
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An Anthony Bourdain Documentary Is in the Works at CNN: ‘We Want to Do Him Justice’

An Anthony Bourdain Documentary Is in the Works at CNN: ‘We Want to Do Him Justice’
The untimely death of Anthony Bourdain earlier this year left a hole in the hearts of millions across the world who’d had their horizons broadened by the chef, TV host, and world citizen. A few months after his suicide, Bourdain’s former network CNN — which aired “Parts Unknown,” a kind of spiritual successor to his earlier “No Reservations” — has announced that it’s working on what’s being billed as “the definitive Bourdain feature documentary.”

“As well as we knew Tony,” CNN’s Amy Entelis tells Vanity Fair, “because he did reveal himself in the series, there was still a hunger to know more about him, and to honor his work and celebrate him. The documentary format became one of the more obvious ways to go.”

“We just want to make it perfect,” she added. “We want to make it exquisite for Tony. We want to do him justice.
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Ivanka Trump Really Hated the ‘Complicit’ Skit on ‘Saturday Night Live,’ Says Omarosa

The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, and it would appear that Donald Trump isn’t the only member of his family who fumed at his portrayal on “Saturday Night Live.” As part of her scorched-earth press tour for her memoir “Unhinged,” Omarosa Manigault has released an excerpt in which she claims that the First Daughter was none too pleased with last year’s “Complicit” skit.

The skit is presented as a perfume ad, with Scarlett Johansson standing in for Ivanka: “A woman like her deserves a fragrance all her own, a scent made just for her,” a narrator intones. “Because she’s beautiful, she’s powerful, she’s…complicit.”

“At the senior staff meeting, Ivanka couldn’t stop bemoaning it, how offensive it was, how ridiculous it was,” Omarosa wrote in an excerpt published People. “We’d all been subject to ‘SNL’ attacks…we’d all been hit,
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Local Products: How Two New Films Speak to the Desire to Move Beyond a Globalized World

The following essay was produced as part of the 2018 Locarno Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the Locarno Film Festival.

Film festivals give one a very particular perspective on world geography. Attendants of this year’s Locarno Film Festival, for instance, have access to delicately rendered portraits of communities in Chile, Lebanon, and Turkey that are remote even to most inhabitants of their native countries. The festival circuit can feel like a microcosmic society unto itself, a loose alliance of city states – Venice, Berlin, Toronto being a few leading names – wholly detached from any particular sense of place. Accordingly, it’s easy to see the passion for the local communities in an increasingly globalized world.

International film culture enacts a tension between the global and the local – one by no means unique to cinema. The punning title of London-born, U.S.-raised experimental filmmaker
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Netflix Has Deleted Every User Review Ever Posted to Its Website

After more than a decade, the era of user-submitted reviews on Netflix has come to a close. The streaming giant has now removed every customer critique ever written, a move that comes a little more than a year after it did away with its five-star rating system in favor of a simple thumbs up/thumbs down approach.

According to the company’s help page, “Netflix customers were able to leave reviews on Netflix.com until mid-2018, when reviews were removed due to declining use.” It may also be the case that negative reviews of movies, TV shows, and stand-up specials did more to dissuade potential viewers than positive reviews did them to draw in; as with most of life’s mysteries, we may never know the true answer.

According to Variety, Netflix said in a statement that “the reviews and our redesigned ratings system (thumbs up/down) never contributed to
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‘To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before’ Author Jenny Han Addresses Criticism for Not Including an Asian Male Love Interest

‘To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before’ Author Jenny Han Addresses Criticism for Not Including an Asian Male Love Interest
August has been a heartening month for Asian representation on screen, ranging from “Crazy Rich Asians” and “Searching” at the movies to the American arrival of the Canadian series “Kim’s Convenience” on Netflix. The streaming service has also released “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before,” a teen rom-com featuring an Asian-American female protagonist and her family. Despite this, some are not thrilled that of the many featured love interests in the story, none are Asian.

IndieWire spoke to author Jenny Han, whose novel is the basis for the movie, about the criticism of excluding Asians boys from the narrative.

“I understand the frustration and I share that frustration of wanting to see more Asian-American men in media,” she said. “For this, all I can say is this is the story that I wrote.”

In the movie, bashful Lara Jean Song Covey (Lana Condor) is a high school
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Anonymous Emmy Ballot: Executive Producer Isn’t a Fan of ‘The Crown,’ But Likes Claire Foy

Anonymous Emmy Ballot: Executive Producer Isn’t a Fan of ‘The Crown,’ But Likes Claire Foy
Pity the Peak TV Emmy voter. The job of choosing the cream of the TV crop used to be so easy. But in an age of hundreds — really, thousands — of TV programs, even the most well-versed viewer hasn’t seen everything. And as we’ve noticed in recent days via these anonymous ballots, sometimes it does come down to talent who have impressed in the past, or who are well-liked in the community. How much does that play a role in who ultimately wins? For one thing, it explains why so many incumbent winners manage to repeat.

IndieWire reached out to creatives across the industry this year to share their own Emmy ballots, anonymously, and explain why they made their choices. Performers, writers, producers, publicists, executives, and craftspeople from across the industry offered up their answers, and IndieWire has been posting some of those ballots this week and next week.
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Review: Living in a Material World—Jon M. Chu's "Crazy Rich Asians"

When fakes are more real than the real…— A Confucian ConfusionIn 1991, the playwright Frank Chin wrote this of Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club: “[It writes] to the specifications of the […] stereotype of Asia being as opposite morally from the West as it is geographically. [...] We expect Asian-American writers, portraying Asia and Asians, to have a knowledge of the difference between the real and the fake. This is a knowledge they have admitted they not only do not possess but also have no interest in possessing. [...] They talk about the agony of the stereotype, but when pressed, have no idea how to describe it.”1Two years later, filmmaker Wayne Wang’s adaptation of Joy Luck Club was a box-office hit that earned nearly three-times its budget in theaters. Frank Chin was labelled a contrarian cynic, and Joy Luck Club continued to rise above all criticism—“It is not deep,” declared the Washington Post
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‘The Crown’ Season 2 Added Color and the Swinging 60s to the Royal Realm

‘The Crown’ Season 2 Added Color and the Swinging 60s to the Royal Realm
The Emmy-nominated crafts team said goodbye to post-war austerity and introduced more color to Season 2 of “The Crown,” which ushered in the Swinging ’60s. That meant isolating Queen Elizabeth (Claire Foy) in Buckingham Palace as she struggles to become relevant, and liberating her younger sister, Princess Margaret (Vanessa Kirby), who hooks up with bohemian photographer Tony Armstrong-Jones (Matthew Goode).

“Slowly the two sisters are diverging and we were able to contrast Elizabeth in the palace and Margaret moving out and meeting Tony for the first time,” said production designer Martin Childs (nominated for “Beryl”). “Suddenly, we’re able to introduce color quite a bit. It was liberating. I was able to run more variation of color of stone, and actually introduce some red and modern, boxed shaped cars.

“People started wearing color and that gave us license to do the interiors in color. But at the same time, because Margaret
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‘Disenchantment’ Review: Matt Groening’s Netflix Debut Starts Rough, But Makes a Surprising About-Face — Spoilers

‘Disenchantment’ Review: Matt Groening’s Netflix Debut Starts Rough, But Makes a Surprising About-Face — Spoilers
Matt Groening’s legacy is ensured by “The Simpsons” alone, and — for better and worse — his trifecta of animated creations can be defined by their relation to the landmark Fox comedy. “The Simpsons” is set in the ever-developing present day; the years pass by in line with the real world yet Maggie is still a toddler despite being old enough to rent a car. “Futurama” launched into the wild world of 2999 with witty asides exploring how the future could be defined by — or at least joked about — based on the events of today.

So it’s a bit strange, and regrettably indicative of the choppy quality, that Groening’s first foray into storytelling’s future is set in the past. “Disenchantment,” the new medieval fantasy series on Netflix, is familiar for many reasons, but whether it’s your first Groening series or one of many, the jokes are stale, their set-ups are mundane,
See full article at Indiewire »

Hollywood Turns Upside Down as Pending Landmark Theatres Sale Could Be the Tip of Upcoming Exhibition Changes

  • Indiewire
A number of speculative deals are floating in the Hollywood ether, as the industry moves away from studio dominance and toward Silicon Valley. Caught in that maw is Twentieth Century Fox’s sale to Disney and At&T’s merger with Warner Bros. But eyes are also on the fate of the indie Landmark Theatres chain, which owner Mark Cuban has been eager to sell since April. Netflix has denied interest in buying the rock-and-mortar exhibitor, which makes sense, as theater distribution is not the streamer’s business model.

On the other hand, now Amazon has been named as a potential buyer. The online retail giant has among its assets Amazon Studios, which (unlike Netflix) brands its productions with robust theatrical releases before streaming them via Amazon Prime. Among the successful Amazon releases that played well at Landmark locations are Oscar players “Manchester By the Sea” and “The Big Sick.” And
See full article at Indiewire »
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