Indie News

Kevin Costner to Voice the Dog in 'The Art of Racing in the Rain' (Exclusive)

Kevin Costner to Voice the Dog in 'The Art of Racing in the Rain' (Exclusive)
Kevin Costner is in talks to play man's best friend in The Art of Racing in the Rain.

If the deal makes, the actor would voice the dog that is central to the story in the Fox 2000's adaptation of Garth Stein's bestselling novel.

The project focuses on a family dog named Enzo who evaluates his life through the lessons learned by his human owner, a professional race-car driver named Denny Swift, who will be played by This Is Us star Milo Ventimiglia.

Simon Curtis, who helmed last year’s drama Goodbye Christopher Robin, is set to direct the adaptation. Neal Moritz is...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘The Equalizer 2’ First Trailer: Denzel Washington Wants You to Know He Can Still Kick Ass

‘The Equalizer 2’ First Trailer: Denzel Washington Wants You to Know He Can Still Kick Ass
Denzel Washington has making movies since 1981, but the one thing he hasn’t done in Hollywood until now is make a sequel. “The Equalizer 2” gives the movie icon his first franchise, and Sony has debuted the ass-kicking first trailer to the sequel to 2014’s box office hit.

The Equalizer 2” finds Washington resuming the role of Robert McCall, a former CIA black-ops operative turned justice-seeking vigilante in Boston. The sequel co-stars “Moonlight” breakout Ashton Sanders, Melissa Leo, Bill Pullman, and Pedro Pascal. Antoine Fuqua, who directed Washington in the first film and in “Training Day” and “The Magnificent Seven,” returns in the director’s chair.

Washington’s last two roles in “Roman J, Israel, Esq.” and “Fences” landed him Oscar nominations for Best Actor. His last blockbuster was Fuqua’s “Magnificent Seven” remake in 2014.

The Equalizer 2” opens in theaters July 20. Watch the first trailer below.
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‘The Equalizer 2’ Trailer: Denzel Washington Is Out For More Vengeance, Obviously

Between high-brow Oscar-nominated performances, Denzel Washington enjoys blowing off steam by pummeling bad guys in action-thrillers. Take “The Equalizer 2,” the upcoming sequel to the 2014 vigilante justice film which earned over $100 million in the U.S. Washington is paired once again with director Antoine Fuqua, reuniting the duo that gave us the original film, as well as “Training Day” and “The Magnificent Seven.”

Read More: Antoine Fuqua’s ‘The Equalizer’ With Denzel Washington Embraces The Cliche Of Tough Guys Walking Away From Explosions

The Equalizer,” based on an ‘80s CBS drama, starred Washington as Robert McCall, a retired CIA operative trying to live a quiet life working at a hardware store in Boston.
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‘Love, Gilda’ Review: Gilda Radner Gets the Last Laugh (And a Few Tears) in Intimate Documentary — Tribeca

‘Love, Gilda’ Review: Gilda Radner Gets the Last Laugh (And a Few Tears) in Intimate Documentary — Tribeca
God bless Gilda Radner for having the foresight to know that people wanted to know her. In Lisa D’Apolito’s intimate new documentary, it’s the late, beloved comedian and original “Saturday Night Live” breakout star who gets to tell her own story, aided by a treasure trove of diary-style audio tapes that serve as voiceover narration and reams of handwritten pages in which the woman behind such unique characters as Roseanne Roseannadanna and Emily Litella opens up about the good, the bad, and the ugly. By no means a vanity project — Radner’s diaries are as clear-eyed as anything when it comes to her struggles involving fame, relationships, and her health — “Love, Gilda” instead offers the kind of keen personal insight into its subject that few documentaries are able to pull off.

D’Apolito directed the film with the full support of Radner’s estate — when she introduced
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Cannes 2018: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ to Close Festival, Michael B. Jordan’s ‘Fahrenheit 451’ Sets Premiere

Cannes 2018: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ to Close Festival, Michael B. Jordan’s ‘Fahrenheit 451’ Sets Premiere
Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is confirmed to world premiere at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, nearly two decades after after the director first started developing the passion project. The fantasy movie, starring Jonathan Pryce and Adam Driver, will close the festival on May 19 after the awards ceremony. “Don Quixote” is being released theatrically in France the same day.

“Don Quixote” stars Pryce as a delusional older man who is convinced he is the real Don Quixote. After he confuses an advertising executive named Toby (Driver) for his squire, Sancho Panza, the two men set out on a journey that seduces Toby into Don Quixote’s illusionary world.

Gilliam first started work on “Don Quixote” back in 1998. The film was considered a question mark for Cannes as it was still facing a potential legal battle earlier this month. Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to the film
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Lars von Trier’s ‘House That Jack Built’ to Premiere at Cannes 2018, Debuts First Footage — Watch

Lars von Trier’s ‘House That Jack Built’ to Premiere at Cannes 2018, Debuts First Footage — Watch
Lars von Trier is officially being welcomed back to the Cannes Film Festival. Thierry Frémaux has confirmed Trier will return to the festival for the first time since 2011’s “Melancholia” with his serial killer drama “The House That Jack Built.” The film will debut in the Out of Competition section, which means it won’t be eligible for the Palme d’Or. Trier was named a “persona non grata” (aka. unwelcome at the festival) after he made comments referencing Nazism during the “Melancholia” press conference.

The House That Jack Built” tracks the origin of a serial killer, played by Matt Dillon. The script is set in the 1970s and follows Jack through the five murders that define his development as a killer. Jack’s victims are played by Uma Thurman, Siobhan Fallon Hogan, Sofie Gråbøl, and Riley Keough.

Trier has a long history with Cannes. He’s competed for the
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Cannes 2018. Lineup

The Festival de Cannes has announced the lineup for the official selection, including the Competition and Un Certain Regard sections, as well as special screenings, for the 71st edition of the festival:COMPETITIONEverybody Knows (Asghar Farhadi)At War (Stéphane Brizé)Dogman (Matteo Garrone)Le livre d'images (Jean-Luc Godard)Netemo Sameteo (Asako I & II) (Ryūsuke Hamaguchi)Sorry Angel (Christophe Honoré)Girls of the Sun (Eva Husson)Ash Is Purest White (Jia Zhangke)Shoplifter (Hirokazu Kore-eda)Capernaum (Nadine Labaki)Burning (Lee Chang-dong)BlacKkKlansman (Spike Lee)Under the Silver Lake (David Robert Mitchell)Three Faces (Jafar Panahi)Cold War (Pawel Pawlikowski)Lazzaro Felice (Alice Rohrwacher)Yomeddine (A.B. Shawky)Leto (Kirill Serebrennikov)Un couteau dans le cœur (Yann Gonzalez)Ayka (Sergei Dvortsevoy)The Wild Pear Tree (Nuri Bilge Ceylan)Out Of COMPETITIONSolo: A Star Wars Story (Ron Howard)Le grand bain (Gilles Lelouch)The House That Jack Built (Lars von Trier)Un Certain REGARDGräns (Ali Abbasi
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‘The Americans’ Review: ‘Mr. and Mrs. Teacup’ Mixes Joy and Pain with Distinct Potency, as an Old Friend Returns

‘The Americans’ Review: ‘Mr. and Mrs. Teacup’ Mixes Joy and Pain with Distinct Potency, as an Old Friend Returns
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “The Americans” Season 6, Episode 4, “Mr. and Mrs. Teacup.”]

Who thought a montage involving Paige making out and Philip line dancing could be so heartbreaking?

Thus is the power of “The Americans,” as showrunners Joel Fields and Joe Weisberg almost simultaneously doled out pleasure and pain in a bone-chilling fourth episode. Philip (Matthew Rhys) clung to his simple pleasures while he could, retreating to his favorite country bar to kick off his boots with coworkers before snacking on potato chips over a pile of mounting bills. Paige’s (Holly Taylor) date turned from a fun night out to a professional conflict as she stared at her sleeping beau’s valuable ID badge. And then there’s Elizabeth (Keri Russell): so close to getting what she needs, only to be left with nothing yet again.

She’s tired, and we’re scared. Much like joy and sorrow are contradictory emotions, each
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‘The Expanse’: The Syfy Drama Takes On TV Faith in a New Way, By Actually Using Real Religions

  • Indiewire
‘The Expanse’: The Syfy Drama Takes On TV Faith in a New Way, By Actually Using Real Religions
[Editor’s note: Spoilers follow for “The Expanse” Season 3, Episode 2, “Iff.”]

In Wednesday night’s episode of “The Expanse,” fans were introduced to a major new player for Season 3, and Anna Volovodov sure did make an impact: because in a sea of screaming men and women, she was the only nice person around.

We first see Anna attempting to enter the United Nations on Earth while scooting past a mob of anti-war protestors. When a young man collapses through the barricade and breaks his wrist in front of her, she demonstrates immense calm as she directs a nearby guard to help the guy, not taking no for an answer but handling the situation with firm grace, even after getting hit in the head.

So it’s not that much of a surprise when we find out that she’s not just a nice lady: She’s a Reverend Doctor who leads a small Methodist congregation, who
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Riverdale’: 8 ‘Carrie’ References You May Have Missed From the Musical Episode

‘Riverdale’: 8 ‘Carrie’ References You May Have Missed From the Musical Episode
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “Riverdale” Episode 18, “Chapter Thirty-One: A Night to Remember.”]

Well, the Riverdale High musical went about as well as could be expected, and by that we mean that someone got murdered.

For the special episode airing Wednesday, the students of “Riverdale” staged a production of “Carrie: The Musical,” a Broadway musical adapted from Stephen King’s 1974 novel. Kevin Keller (Casey Cott) directed the play with Cheryl (Madelaine Petsch) in the title role and Alice Cooper (Madchen Amick) as her religious mother Margaret. Or at least, that was the plan until Kevin continued to receive cut-and-paste death threats from the Black Hood (but didn’t he die?) demanding that Cheryl be replaced as the lead or else a very heavy sandbag would take her out of commission.

Even though Cheryl refuses to bow to thespian terrorism, her mother Penelope (Nathalie Boltt) refuses to let her participate, forcing Kevin to replace Cheryl with
See full article at Indiewire »

#DocsSoWhite: The Gatekeepers at The 21st Annual Full Frame Documentary Film Festival

Recently, I’d been pondering why the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival always tops my must-attend U.S. doc fest list. Like few fests in the U.S. or Europe, Full Frame truly walks the walk — it’s a top tier, mainstream nonfiction festival in which the people in power are almost exclusively women. Indeed, one look at the 10-member staff page on the Full Frame website reveals just two male faces (only one of which is white). Then there are the attendees, the other ingredient that makes Full Frame truly special — as many folks of color as white. The one thing […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

#DocsSoWhite: The Gatekeepers at The 21st Annual Full Frame Documentary Film Festival

Recently, I’d been pondering why the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival always tops my must-attend U.S. doc fest list. Like few fests in the U.S. or Europe, Full Frame truly walks the walk — it’s a top tier, mainstream nonfiction festival in which the people in power are almost exclusively women. Indeed, one look at the 10-member staff page on the Full Frame website reveals just two male faces (only one of which is white). Then there are the attendees, the other ingredient that makes Full Frame truly special — as many folks of color as white. The one thing […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

‘The Looming Tower’ Producers on Creating a 9/11 ‘Origin Story’ for Americans Who Demand Answers

One of the main reasons Lawrence Wright wanted to turn his Pulitzer Prize-winning non-fiction book into a TV series was he thought people were losing touch with what happened — and why it happened.

“What had become apparent to me is that enough time has passed, [and] a new generation has grown up, and they don’t understand what 9/11 was,” Wright said in an interview with IndieWire. “For them, it was like World War II was for me: It was something that happened in my parent’s generation that really changed the world, and they speak of it in hushed tones. But what was the world like before then?”

So when Wright set out to turn “The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11” into a limited series, he didn’t think of it as another 9/11 story. He and his chosen collaborator — Alex Gibney, who worked with Wright on the HBO documentary
See full article at Indiewire »

‘A Quiet Place’: How John Krasinski’s Horror Blockbuster Got its Badass Creature

‘A Quiet Place’: How John Krasinski’s Horror Blockbuster Got its Badass Creature
Designing the blind, shrieking creature for “A Quiet Place” was hard enough for Industrial Light & Magic. (Spoilers Ahead.) But when the first pass wasn’t scary enough for director John Krasinski and producers Brad Fuller and Andrew Form (of Platinum Dunes), the VFX studio had to start all over with less than a month to deliver the goods. They obviously succeeded, with the acclaimed horror blockbuster reaching $102 million and counting.

“We looked at a lot of new ideas and came up with a combination of teeth with no eyes,” said Scott Farrar, Ilm’s visual effects supervisor (the “Transformers” franchise). “That was scarier. John had his own ideas about weird fish with shells that looked like hard stone and having them run like bats with their wings folded.”

Read More: ‘A Quiet Place’: John Krasinski’s Sound Team Shaped a Blockbuster Out of Silence”

Opening Up the Flaps

Getting
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Finding The Tragedy in The Absurd: Talking Emir Kusturica’s ‘Arizona Dream’ and ‘Underground’ [Over/Under Movies Podcast]

Welcome to another edition of Over/Under Movies, the podcast in which we choose one overrated film and one underrated film — similar in tone, genre, style, or however we may see fit — and we discuss them.

This is an episode where we chuck the overrated pick and talk about a director we find to be underrated. The focus is on Emir Kusturica, the Serbian director who was hailed in Europe during the 90s to be Fellini’s second-coming but didn’t get much attention stateside.
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‘House of Flying Daggers’ Director Zhang Yimou’s Latest Film To Premiere At Cannes

Yeah, so maybe Zhang Yimou’s last film, “The Great Wall,” wasn’t the best piece of cinema ever created. The Matt Damon-led film was a supposed to be a global hit, as it had an all-star cast and was directed by one of the legends in Chinese film doing his first ever English-language film. But instead, it just was meh. But never fear!
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The 18 Best Sci-Fi TV Shows Set In Space, Ranked

  • Indiewire
Space is a scary place, as we’ve seen in countless movies and TV shows — but the thrills that come with these stories prove that while the dangers of venturing off this planet are many, there are still thrills a’plenty in the great unknown, and adventures beyond our potential comprehension.

Timed to the Season 3 premiere of Syfy’s “The Expanse” and the launch of the Netflix’s “Lost in Space” reboot, here’s a look back at all the great sci-fi television we’ve seen set in the cosmos, a rich tradition of storytelling that’s captured our imagination for decades.

Debating what counts as a “space show” is tricky, though one easy rule was that the show has to center around a spaceship or space station of some sort. Some of these selections below didn’t last all that long — several Season 1s weren’t followed by Season 2s — as television,
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‘Avengers: Infinity War’: Will A Major Character Die At The Beginning Of The Film?

As we approach the release date for “Avengers: Infinity War,” the rumor mill is heating up. And today we have some rumors about the film, as well as ‘Avengers 4,’ and some new tidbits about what you might expect on the eventual Blu-ray that we know everyone is going to end up buying.

The first bit of news today comes from Screen Geek. The website claims that a “reliable source” has information about ‘Infinity War’ that is sure to send fans’ minds racing.
See full article at The Playlist »

Gender-Flipping on TV: What’s Gained When a Male Character Is Reimagined as Female

Gender-Flipping on TV: What’s Gained When a Male Character Is Reimagined as Female
What’s old is new again, and that includes the practice of gender-flipping a role. Commonly seen in folk tales and comic book properties, the practice has been a staple on the big screen and gaining popularity on TV, especially when it comes to reimagining male characters as female.

Swapping a character’s gender often occurs in the process of remaking or reimagining a pre-existing story. The most recent example on TV is the casting of Parker Posey to portray the villainous Dr. Smith on Netflix’s reboot of “Lost in Space.” The role was originated by Jonathan Harris in the ‘60s-era Irwin Allen series.

But gender-flipping can also occur in the process of creating a new character. In the case of lawyer Jeri Hogarth on “Marvel’s Jessica Jones,” the production started by crafting a female character and then retrofitting her with an identity from Marvel. That’s how Jeryn Hogarth,
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‘The Devil and Father Amorth’ Review: ‘Exorcist’ Director William Friedkin Hails Satan in a Doc Update of His Horror Classic

‘The Devil and Father Amorth’ Review: ‘Exorcist’ Director William Friedkin Hails Satan in a Doc Update of His Horror Classic
A born raconteur, 81-year-old Hollywood legend William Friedkin still has the itch. While some other men his age have already resigned themselves to the golf course (if not the grave), the director of films like “Sorcerer” and “The Exorcist” can’t help but continue to tell stories. He’s possessed by a spiritual compulsion to spin yarns, inflame imaginations, and reach into the unknown folds of our world. It’s been seven years since his last feature (2011’s gleefully insane “Killer Joe”), but the guy hasn’t exactly been twiddling his thumbs — after all, idle hands are the devil’s playthings.

Friedkin’s latest project is basically what happens when an octogenarian auteur — too seasoned to navigate the studio system, but too sprightly to be silenced — picks up a consumer-grade digital camera and makes an unofficial sequel to their most famous film. No lawyers, no money, no crew. Non-union, and non-fiction.
See full article at Indiewire »
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