Indie News

Neill Blomkamp’s Oats Studios Cancels ‘Firebase’ Movie Crowdfunding Effort After Not Raising Enough Money

Neill Blomkamp’s Oats Studios Cancels ‘Firebase’ Movie Crowdfunding Effort After Not Raising Enough Money
Neill Blomkamp’s dream of raising money from fans to turn his startup studio’s Vietnam War-set short film “Firebase” into a full-length film has ended, for now.

Oats Studios, which Blomkamp launched last year as an outlet for experimental shorts, said on Friday that it was canceling its “Firebase” crowdfunding effort because it hadn’t raised enough cash to make something “awesome.” Oats didn’t say how much it had raised but said it would issue refunds to everyone who contributed.

“Unfortunately we didn’t raise enough to do something truley [sic] awesome,” the studio said in a tweet Friday. “We would rather over deliver than create an average film. We thank the thousands of people who did back us- hang in there.”

To all backers of Firebase.. Oats will be refunding everyone who contributed completely. Unfortunately we didn't raise enough to do something truley awesome. We would rather over
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Screen Media Nabs SXSW Film ‘The Unicorn’; Parade Deck Acquires ‘Goodland’

Screen Media Nabs SXSW Film ‘The Unicorn’; Parade Deck Acquires ‘Goodland’
Screen Media has secured the North American rights to Robert Schwartzman's (Dreamland) sophomore film, The Unicorn, which had its world premiere at the recent SXSW Film Festival. The romantic comedy, which will be released sometime this year, stars comedians Lauren Lapkus and Nick Rutherford as an indecisive couple thrust into the most uncomfortable night of their lives when they decide to invite a third party into their relationship. Lucy Hale, Beck Bennett, Dree…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

‘Jane the Virgin’ Finale: 5 Theories Explaining That Massive Twist

‘Jane the Virgin’ Finale: 5 Theories Explaining That Massive Twist
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “Jane the Virgin,” Season 4, Episode 17, “Chapter Eighty-One.”]

Well, we really didn’t see that one him coming.

While “Jane the Virgin” hinted that something huge and unforeseen would happen in the finale, that felt as if it were an obvious promise. After all, it’s a show based on a telenovela. But what would it be this time? Many hints pointed to another death or a deep, dark secret in Rafael’s (Justin Baldoni) past that would put a monkey wrench in his future happiness with Jane (Gina Rodriguez).

Viewers had become somewhat used to the usual twists — dead bodies! secret twins! — by now. Besides, after the show killed off Jane’s husband Michael (Brett Dier) before the third season even reached its halfway point, it felt as if viewers couldn’t be that blindsided again… until Friday’s Season 4 finale.

Throughout the episode, Rafael had acted despondent and upset
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Genius: Picasso’ Review: Antonio Banderas Spices Up a Painfully Banal Portrait of the Great Abstract Artist

“Genius: Picasso” is a telling title in how it orders those two words. Though last year’s debut season of the National Geographic anthology series didn’t feel the need to incorporate “Einstein” into its name, the second season makes sure the brand takes priority over the subject — and the creative elements follow suit.

Season 2 is a painful bore. Using the same formula devised for an entirely different character, “Genius: Picasso” short-shrifts the few compelling angles it touches upon in favor of covering a wide swath of the painter’s life. Again, there are two stories running in parallel to each other: One is of Picasso in his early twenties, with Alex Ross depicting a passionate artist finding his vision. The other, largely framed around the Nazi occupation of Paris, follows an older Picasso played by Antonio Banderas.

Each timeline has its strong points (Ross and Banderas both among them
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Wyatt Cenac’s Problem Areas’ Takes on Police Mistreatment of Transgender Women With Sensitivity

In the second episode of “Wyatt Cenac’s Problem Areas,” the stand-up comedian’s new late night series for HBO, Cenac finds a glimmer of hope in the most unlikely of places: Birmingham, Alabama. The half-hour episode concludes with a field piece that finds Cenac in the birthplace of the civil rights movement, where he is surprised to discover a majority black police force that has been working with community groups to make amends for its history of police violence. Despite the progressive changes, one of the city’s most vulnerable groups is left out of the process: The transgender community, particularly women of color.

Daroneshia Duncan, who runs a resource center for transgender women in Birmingham, says police often misgender transgender women, or label their murders cold cases without conducting a thorough investigation. “They still refuse to accept you for who you are,” she said. Another woman added: “You
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Into the Badlands’ Season 3 Review: Martial Arts Drama Goes Deeper With the Mythology, But Remains Bonkers Fun

  • Indiewire
‘Into the Badlands’ Season 3 Review: Martial Arts Drama Goes Deeper With the Mythology, But Remains Bonkers Fun
Let’s open with this: Nick Frost is a gift. Not just to mankind, but very specifically to “Into the Badlands.” Added to the series in Season 2 (perhaps after creators Al Gough and Miles Millar heard one too many complaints about Season 1 lacking a sense of humor), scenes featuring the frequent Simon Pegg/Edgar Wright collaborator often involve him simultaneously slinging around quips while performing the sort of physical moves you wouldn’t believe a man of his build capable of naturally. But it’s fun to watch, especially when Bajie (Frost) teams up with Sunny (Daniel Wu) to destroy packs of guards. Wu dances his way through a battle scene, sword slicing through limbs like butter, while Frost balances that with powerful punches and faster-than-light kicks.

It’s worth singling out Frost because while the character of Sunny is at the center of the bonkers AMC drama, which returns for a third season Sunday,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Blue Night’ Review: Sarah Jessica Parker Shines In a Dour Homage to Agnès Varda — Tribeca

Perhaps the best thing that can be said about Fabien Constant’s “Blue Night,” a sensitive but shallow homage to 1962’s “Cléo from 5 to 7,” is that it convincingly validates the idea of updating the Agnès Varda classic. The worst thing that can be said about it is that it peaks with a Sarah Jessica Parker cover of “I Think We’re Alone Now” during the closing credits, but we’ll get to that later.

The story of a beautiful young woman’s brush with mortality, Varda’s film used the timelessness of its premise as an opportunity to contextualize the topical despairs of the day, which ranged from the ongoing Algerian War to Édith Piaf’s recent stomach ulcer surgeries. Seen through the eyes of a potentially dying chanteuse — the film’s title refers to the anxious hours that its heroine spends waiting for the results of a biopsy — everything became equally small,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Charité’ Review: Netflix’s Historical Hospital Drama Won’t Fix ‘The Knick’-Sized Hole in Your Heart

‘Charité’ Review: Netflix’s Historical Hospital Drama Won’t Fix ‘The Knick’-Sized Hole in Your Heart
One of the most fascinating elements of “Charité,” the new six-part German miniseries now available on Netflix, is the operation theater. As a medical drama set in the late 19th century, this combination lecture hall and surgical venue is as compelling a concept as it is unsanitary. To see a procedure like a tracheotomy or an appendectomy, both in their nascent development stages, presented in such a matter-of-fact way is jarring by design. To see progress and hubris in tandem is one of the main reasons why medical dramas (especially ones set in a distant time) continue to be a regular TV staple.

Whenever “Charité” returns to the exhibition-style setting of that instructional surgery hall, it’s hard not to think of the similar scenes in “The Knick,” a show that by virtue of its styling and being set a decade later took a more modern approach to this subgenre.
See full article at Indiewire »

Happy 4/20: 10 Stoner Movies That Will Get You High

It’s pretty fitting that 4/20, the day to celebrate getting high and cannabis culture would be a rather inane, insider-y and secret code-term made by high school stoners that didn’t want their parents to know they were going to get baked. Or that’s one theory from a rather nonsensical Wikipedia post which I’m convinced was jacked by the Internet today.

Some versions about the theories and origins of 4/20 was the California penal code or the police radio code for marijuana (False).
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Atlanta’ Writer on Paper Boi’s Heartbreaking Loss, ‘Teddy Perkins,’ and Life After ‘Deadpool’

‘Atlanta’ Writer on Paper Boi’s Heartbreaking Loss, ‘Teddy Perkins,’ and Life After ‘Deadpool’
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “Atlanta” Season 2, Episode 8, “Woods.”]

“Teddy Perkins” might have been the most horrific “Atlanta” episode to date, but Thursday’s “Woods” still gave viewers plenty of reason to flinch and be frightened. After ditching his not-girlfriend at the nail parlor, Alfred (Brian Tyree Henry) is walking home when three teenagers recognize him as Paper Boi, but decide to mug him anyway because he’s alone. The resulting struggle is messy, brutal, and difficult to watch. When one assailant pulls a gun, Alfred flees into the nearby woods.

As a main character, Alfred would normally be free from real consequences on a so-called comedy, but it certainly doesn’t feel like it here. With the murder-suicide and Darius’ (Lakeith Stanfield) close call in “Teddy Perkins,” it seemed as if maybe this would be the episode where one of our heroes dies. Alfred certainly doesn’t get away from the encounter unscathed.

“Our
See full article at Indiewire »

Apple’s Still-Secretive TV Plans: Here’s What We Know So Far, Including a List of Shows

  • Indiewire
It’s the biggest question in Hollywood that everyone is asking, and no one has an answer yet: What will Apple’s upcoming video offering actually look like, and how will it be delivered to viewers?

“I don’t know, and nobody knows, and it makes me nervous,” said one top Hollywood agent. “I’d sell one-off deals with Apple all day long. But I’d never do a [major, long-term talent deal] with them because I don’t know what it means to be an Apple show. How do they market it? Where’s it going to show up? How are people going to see it? It makes no sense to me.”

All is expected to be revealed later this fall, as Apple gears up to enter an already saturated marketplace in early 2019. The competition is fierce: Netflix has 125 million customers globally, while Amazon just revealed that Prime has 100 million consumers. Hulu is also in the mix,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Scarface’ At Tribeca: 7 Highlights From The 35th Anniversary Screening

The ornate Beacon Theatre served as the perfect setting for the Tribeca Film Festival’s 35th Anniversary of “Scarface,” Brian De Palma’s baroque epic of American greed. The film’s wide and enduring appeal was evident in the diversity of the rowdy, sold-out crowd, which even featured some confrontations during the film over Tony Montana acolytes in the crowd quoting dialogue aloud.

After the film, Tony himself (Al Pacino) joined the crowd along with Elvira (Michelle Pfeiffer), Manny (Steven Bauer), and Brian De Palma to discuss the film.
See full article at The Playlist »

John Carpenter Returns To ‘Halloween’ Franchise To Provide Score For New Film

John Carpenter Returns To ‘Halloween’ Franchise To Provide Score For New Film
It feels like it wasn’t that long ago that Blumhouse Productions announced that they were making, yet another, entry in the “Halloween” franchise. Now, we are almost exactly 6 months from the film’s release, and the buzz around the sequel/reboot/remake is starting to build. And the excitement will increase even more now that it has been confirmed that filmmaker/composer John Carpenter is back lending his talents to the new film.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Essentials: Jack Nicholson’s Best Films

Jack Nicholson is eccentric. Jack Nicholson is also rich enough to afford the luxury of eccentricity. But even in the late ’60s, remember the breakout role of “Easy Rider” didn’t come until 1969, Nicholson did weird, surreal things like walking around nude for months at a time. “As a matter of self-help, he spent three months walking around in the nude, at all hours of the day, no matter who stopped by, his daughter included,” Rolling Stone wrote in a 2013 profile.
See full article at The Playlist »

NoRA: Amy Schumer, Michael Moore, Jimmy Kimmel, and More Announce New Initiative to Combat the NRA

Famous gun-control advocates commemorated the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting Friday by launching the No Rifle Association [NoRA] Initiative. The undertaking became public when Time Magazine published an open letter from 100-plus NoRA members — including Amy Schumer, Michael Moore, Jill Soloway, Jimmy Kimmel, Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Debra Messing, Jon Favreau, Amber Tamblyn, Bradley Whitford, Minnie Driver, Michael Ian Black, Constance Wu, Patton Oswalt, Alyssa Milano, and Annabella Sciorra — to National Rifle Association Executive Vice President Wayne Lapierre.

“Your time signing checks in our blood is up,” reads the letter, whose authors are planning boycotts, demonstrations, voter registration drives, and cross-country art campaigns. “We'[r]e a diverse, non-partisan coalition of activists, artists, celebrities, writers, gun violence survivors, and policy experts. We’re going to shine a bright light on what you and your organization to do America…We’re coming for your money. We’re coming for your puppets.
See full article at Indiewire »

“A Very Old Fashioned Kind of Filmmaking”: Dp Charlotte Bruus Christensen on Shooting A Quiet Place on 35mm

A few months after my son was born, I took my wife to see the Tommy Lee Jones western The Homesman. If you know that movie, then you know why it was a bad idea: minutes into the film, a woman driven mad by the harshness of pioneer life kills her infant child. My wife nearly walked out. I didn’t understand that impulse at the time, but as my kid has gotten older I’ve become equally squeamish toward onscreen violence directed at children. It’s not an uncommon sentiment for parents, which is why it’s a perilous choice to open the new horror […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“A Very Old Fashioned Kind of Filmmaking”: Dp Charlotte Bruus Christensen on Shooting A Quiet Place on 35mm

A few months after my son was born, I took my wife to see the Tommy Lee Jones western The Homesman. If you know that movie, then you know why it was a bad idea: minutes into the film, a woman driven mad by the harshness of pioneer life kills her infant child. My wife nearly walked out. I didn’t understand that impulse at the time, but as my kid has gotten older I’ve become equally squeamish toward onscreen violence directed at children. It’s not an uncommon sentiment for parents, which is why it’s a perilous choice to open the new horror […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Frankenstein AI: A Monster Made by Many’ Is Here to Assuage Your Fears of Artificial Intelligence — Watch

‘Frankenstein AI: A Monster Made by Many’ Is Here to Assuage Your Fears of Artificial Intelligence — Watch
Mere months after blowing minds at Sundance, the interactive “Frankenstein AI: A Monster Made by Many” may now be experienced from the comfort of your own home. Not unlike Mary Shelley’s classic novel, the exploration of artificial-intelligence explores what happens when humans create something that gets away from them — but, in this case, it’s meant to assuage our fears rather than stoke them.

The project, which will continue for several years, aims to upend the dystopian view of artificial intelligence as well as “provoke and broaden conversation around the trajectory of this rapidly emerging technology.” That journey began in Park City and is meant to continue with help from the public. The creators envision it as “an evolving series of activations and experiences both online and off, that will traverse immersive theatre, browser-based interactions, community design, and other performative and experiential media.”

Lance Weiler is the Executive Creative
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Deadpool 2’ Director Says Some Jokes In The Trailers Will Be Changed When The Film’s Released

Yesterday, we shared the most recent (and final) trailer for “Deadpool 2.” While the marketing materials for the sequel, so far, haven’t quite lived up to the high bar set by the first film, the final trailer had some really great action and jokes that get us excited for the film’s release next month.

The great action is courtesy of director David Leitch (“Atomic Blonde”), who is coming on board the sequel and replacing Tim Miller.
See full article at The Playlist »

MoviePass’ Parent Company Lost $150.8 Million in 2017, Raising ‘Substantial Doubt’ It Can Continue

There may be a reason why MoviePass seems too good to be true. The company has seen its user base grow exponentially since drastically lowering prices last summer, but allowing subscribers to see one movie per day for the princely sum of $9.95/month has never made economic sense to many observers.

According to Variety, an independent audit of parent company Helios & Matheson appears to have confirmed those fears. Its findings revealed “substantial doubt” that MoviePass can continue is “a going concern.”

“MoviePass currently spends more to retain a subscriber than the revenue derived from that subscriber and MoviePass other sources of revenue are currently inadequate to offset or exceed the costs of subscriber retention,” the audit reads. “This results in a negative gross profit margin. MoviePass expects its negative gross profit margin to remain significant until MoviePass can sufficiently increase its other sources of revenues to offset the losses or achieve substantial economies of scale.
See full article at Indiewire »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.