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Los Cabos 2018 Dispatch: Border and The Sisters Brothers, Two Of The Festival's World Highlights

At the core of Let the Right One In, one of the most memorable vampire films of the past decade, was Oskar (Kåre Hedebrant), a lonely, misfit, and bullied young boy with little attention from his divorced parents. He found an unexpected bond of friendship and love with a girl Eli (Lina Leandersson), who initially hid a bloody secret. Imagine that a girl equivalent to the Oskar that we know at the beginning of Let the Right One In –- that is, someone who is despised by others for being “different" –- has grown up and has incorporated into society in a productive way. With this, you have an idea of ​​the type of character that is Tina (Eva Melander) in Ali Abbasi's Border, a...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Dunkirk’: 6 Movies That Prepared Christopher Nolan’s Go-To Cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema

‘Dunkirk’: 6 Movies That Prepared Christopher Nolan’s Go-To Cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema
Hoyte van Hoytema has emerged as one of the great cinematographers of our time: cerebral, emotional, poetic. He creates texture and beauty with formal precision. He’s the thinking person’s cinematographer, who synthesizes the past and the present, but prefers shooting on film for organic, analog warmth.

No wonder director Christopher Nolan was drawn to the Dutch-Swedish cinematographer. They are kindred spirits, and their work on “Interstellar” and “Dunkirk” (shot mostly with the 15-perf IMAX film camera) recalls the scope and intimacy of the legendary David Lean and Freddie Young pairing on “Lawrence of Arabia” and “Doctor Zhivago.”

In all likelihood, “Dunkirk,” which portrays the heroic evacuation of Allied soldiers from German occupation during the early stages of World War II, should result in Hoytema’s first Oscar nomination. Shot from three perspectives — land, sea, and air — the footage we’ve seen thus far is breathtaking in its visceral force.
See full article at Indiewire »

The 100 Best Films of the 21st Century (So Far) - Part 3: #50-26

  • Cinelinx
Our countdown of the 100 best films of the 21st century continues. This is Part 3 #50 through 26.

Click here for Part 1 (#100 - 76)!

Click here for Part 2 (#75-51)!

The first decade and a half of the 21st century has brought a lot of changes to the landscape of film. The advancement and sophistication of computers has made realistic computer generated effects a mainstay in both big-budget and small-budget films. The internet and streaming technologies have given big Hollywood new competition in films produced independently and by non-traditional means. We went from purchasing films on yards of tape to plastic disks, and now we can simply upload them to the cloud. Advertisements for films have reached a higher, more ruthless level where generating hype through trailers and teasers is crucial for a film’s commercial success. Movie attendance has fluctuated along with the economy, but that hasn’t stopped films from breaking box office records,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Let the Right One In TV Series Adaptation In Development at A&E

Norman Bates and the resurrected people of The Returned could be getting more company in the growing horror community on A&E, as the network is developing a TV series adaptation of John Ajvide Lindqvist's world-renowned Sweden-set vampire novel, Let the Right One In.

The Hollywood Reporter reveals that A&E is collaborating with Jeff Davis (Teen Wolf showrunner) and Brandon Boyce (who wrote the screenplay adaptation of Stephen King's Apt Pupil and also played Dr. Vandenburg in Teen Wolf) on the adaptation of the 2004 novel, Let the Right One In, aka Låt den rätte komma in, with both Davis and Boyce set to scribe the script.

A&E and Showtime were both looking to adapt the vampiric coming-of-age story, with the former outbidding the latter in the end and gaining the optioned story from Hammer Films Productions.

A&E is currently developing the series in-house along with Tomorrow Studios.
See full article at DailyDead »

Across a Crowded Cinema – Top 10 First Loves in the Movies

  • HeyUGuys
Abdellatif Kechiche’s controversial drama Blue is the Warmest Colour is a harrowing account of first love from the view of teenager Adèle, played with heartbreaking credibility by Adèle Exarchopoulos, performing against Léa Seydoux’s Emma.

This poignant piece offers an exemplary illustration of the joys and tribulations of young romance, so to mark the release of the winner of the hugely prestigious Palme d’Or award – which hits our cinema screens on November 22nd – we take a look at some other prime cinematic examples of first love.

10) Let the Right One In (2008)

dir. Thomas Alfredson

Based on John Ajvide Lindqvist’s vampire novel and pinching a line from Morrissey’s Let The Right One Slip In for its title, Alfredson’s chilling adaptation is as sweet as it is sinister. Set in a haunting Stockholm suburbia, a solitary and bullied twelve year old boy Oskar (Kåre Hedebrant) finds solace in an enchanting new neighbour,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Let the Right One In opens door to stage adaptation

Tomas Alfredson's acclaimed Swedish drama to show at Dundee Rep Theatre, with John Tiffany directing

Let the Right One In, Tomas Alfredson's acclaimed Swedish drama about a little girl vampire and the bullied boy who loves her, looks set to rise again, as a stage production, in the Scottish town of Dundee. "It is a deeply felt love story and that sense of Denmark, Sweden, Norway, the world of coldness, seems just right for a Scottish setting," explained Vicky Featherstone, the outgoing artistic director of the National Theatre of Scotland.

The vampire romance will form the centrepiece of the Nts's 2013 programme and will open at the Dundee Rep Theatre, with John Tiffany directing. "If it delights the people of Dundee, it would be nice to think it would have a future life in other places," said Featherstone.

Based on the 2004 novel by John Ajvide Lindquist, Let the Right One In
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Thoughts on... Let the Right One In (2008)

Let the Right One In (Sweden: Låt den rätte komma in), 2008

Directed by Thomas Alfredson.

Starring Kåre Hedebrant, Lina Leandersson, Per Ragnar, Peter Carlberg, Ika Nord and Mikael Rahm.

Synopsis:

In 1981, in a quaint, wintery suburb of Stockholm, 12 year old outcast Oskar gets more than he bargained for when he unwittingly befriends a vampire.

A genre recently dominated by wistful, idealistic love affairs between humans and vampires influenced by the scrawlings of Twilight novelist Stephenie Meyer is, if you’ll forgive the pun, revamped by Thomas Alfredson’s touchingly haunting adaptation of John Ajvide Lindqvist’s tale of love, murder and social integration.

Oskar is a pariah; bullied at school, neglected at home by his divorced mother who works nights and largely disregarded by his father when he sees him. One day, when enacting imaginary revenge upon his tormentors with some Dirty Harry-like jibes and knife thrusts, he is interrupted by Eli,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rewind – ‘Let Me In’ vs. ‘Let The Right One In’

Let Me In

Directed by Matt Reeves

vs. Let The Right One In

Directed by Tomas Alfredson

Even in a pop culture landscape littered with the bloodthirsty undead, Let The Right One In stood out as a poignant coming of age story as well as a bone-chilling horror film. The haunting mediation on the difficult and often painful transition into adolescence garnered much praise on the festival circuit in 2008. The film earned a loyal cult following through word of mouth and when Matt Reeves announced his American remake, those very same cinephiles lashed out in anger. The general consensus was, “why fix something that isn’t broken?”

Sadly, mainstream audiences seem to have a problem with subtitles, so it was inevitable that the film would be remade. That said, fans of the original should be grateful that Matt Reeves (Cloverfield), alongside legendary British horror brand Hammer Films (a studio that
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Exclusive: Richard Jenkins Talks Let Me In

Exclusive: Richard Jenkins Talks Let Me In
Richard Jenkins talks about Matt Reeves' harrowing vampire remake, Let Me In

Matt Reeves took on the challenge of remaking Let the Right One In, one of the most revered vampire thrillers seen in the last decade, and succeeded in creating something that wasn't just a lame carbon copy of the original. Let Me In, which was released this past October, actually stands on its own as a mercifully adept horror film about three lonely people coming to terms with their doomed fate. One of the things that separates Let Me In from other recent vampire outings is that it has crafted characters unique to the genre, and Matt Reeves cast an outstanding ensemble to bring these lost souls to life.

In the film, Richard Jenkins plays ten-year-old vampire Abby's (Chloe Moretz) protector, a Renfield-like servant who has grown tired and weary of his place at her side. It's
See full article at MovieWeb »

19 strangely Christmassy sci-fi and horror movies

Christmas has a hell of a PR agent. A good PR maximises the audience for their client, always looking for lateral markets beyond the core appeal of the product. So if Christmas is fundamentally about giving, goodwill and forgiveness, there's no harm - from a PR's point of view - if it can also be made to be about sex, death and loneliness too. We seem to have had our traditional - and always sad - fusillade of pre-Christmas celebrity deaths this year, and if we're lucky, the period between now and new year will bring no new and nasty surprises in that line.

In the meantime our TV screens have filled up customarily with ads for perfume and booze which remind us that Christmas is also a Pagan-style locus for celebrations of the carnal and sensory. And with campaigns targeted at those who have no invite to the celebrations
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Let the Right One In: No 8 best horror film of all time

Tomas Alfredson, 2008

The snow whirls, the nights draw in and a gloomy Swedish housing estate becomes a pocket murderess's hunting ground. Let the Right One In is based on a book by John Ajvide Lindqvist and directed by Tomas Alfredson, a former comedian. Here is a vampire story born out of the shadows; a film of whispered secrets. But don't lean too close: it may well pull out your throat.

Oskar (Kåre Hedebrant) is a bullied 12-year-old schoolboy who befriends Eli (Lina Leandersson), who is pale of skin and dark of eye and wise beyond her years ("I've been 12 for a very long time," she explains). Eli has recently moved into the estate with a man who may possibly be her father, or a paedophile (as he was in the novel), or a lover who has grown old while she remains young. She needs constant feeding and her blundering, alcoholic neighbours provide easy pickings.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Trailer: Let Me In

This is the first trailer on Pure Movies for Let Me In, directed by Matt Reeves and starring Chloe Moretz (Kick-Ass), Kodi Smit-McPhee (The Road), Richard Jenkins, Elias Koteas, Sasha Barrese and Cara Buono. The film is a remake of the fantastic Let The Right One In, directed by Tomas Alfredson and starring Kåre Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson. and neglected by his divorcing parents. Achingly lonely, Owen spends his days plotting revenge on his middle school tormentors and his evenings spying on the other inhabitants of his apartment complex. His only friend is his new neighbor Abby (Chloe Moretz), an eerily self-possessed young girl who lives next door with her silent father (Oscar nominee Richard Jenkins). A frail, troubled child about Owen's age, Abby emerges from her heavily curtained apartment only at night and always barefoot, seemingly immune to the bitter winter elements. Recognizing a fellow outcast, Owen opens up to her and before long,
See full article at Pure Movies »

Trailer: Let Me In – Trailer 2

This is second trailer for Let Me In, directed by Matt Reeves and starring Chloe Moretz (Kick-Ass), Kodi Smit-McPhee (The Road), Richard Jenkins, Elias Koteas, Sasha Barrese and Cara Buono. The film is a remake of the fantastic Let The Right One In, directed by Tomas Alfredson and starring Kåre Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson. Let Me In tells a terrifying tale about an alienated 12-year old boy named Owen (Kodi Smit-McPhee) who is viciously bullied by his classmates and neglected by his divorcing parents. Achingly lonely, Owen spends his days plotting revenge on his middle school tormentors and his evenings spying on the other inhabitants of his apartment complex. His only friend is his new neighbor Abby (Chloe Moretz), an eerily self-possessed young girl who lives next door with her silent father (Oscar nominee Richard Jenkins). A frail, troubled child about Owen's age, Abby emerges from her heavily curtained apartment
See full article at Pure Movies »

Trailer: Let Me In – Teaser Trailer

This is the teaser trailer for Let Me In, directed by Matt Reeves and starring Chloe Moretz (Kick-Ass), Kodi Smit-McPhee (The Road), Richard Jenkins, Elias Koteas, Sasha Barrese and Cara Buono. The film is a remake of the fantastic Let The Right One In, directed by Tomas Alfredson and starring Kåre Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson. and neglected by his divorcing parents. Achingly lonely, Owen spends his days plotting revenge on his middle school tormentors and his evenings spying on the other inhabitants of his apartment complex. His only friend is his new neighbor Abby (Chloe Moretz), an eerily self-possessed young girl who lives next door with her silent father (Oscar nominee Richard Jenkins). A frail, troubled child about Owen's age, Abby emerges from her heavily curtained apartment only at night and always barefoot, seemingly immune to the bitter winter elements. Recognizing a fellow outcast, Owen opens up to her and before long,
See full article at Pure Movies »

Let Me In international trailer unveiled

The first trailer appears for Let Me In, Matt Reeves’ remake of the Swedish vampire tale Let The Right One In

With Twilight mania reaching fever pitch in the wake of the release of Eclipse, I suppose it was inevitable that somebody would decide to remake Tomas Alfredson's excellent Let The Right One In, first released last year.

Adapted from the novel of the same name by Swedish writer John Ajvide Lindqvist, Let The Right One In was a mixture of childhood drama and atmospheric vampire tale. Set in a chilly 80s Stockholm beautifully realised by Alfredson, the film related the story of quiet, perpetually bullied 12-year-old Oskar and his relationship with Eli, an enigmatic female vampire of the same age.

Helmed by Cloverfield director Matt Reeves, Let Me In relocates the story from Sweden to New Mexico, while remaining particularly faithful to Alfredson's 2009 adaptation. When Let Me In was announced last year,
See full article at Den of Geek »

First Look At Hit-Girl In The Vampire Teen Horror Movie 'Let Me In'

There was a lot of hype about how awesome the foreign vampire teen thriller Let The Right One In was, but I didn't get why. It's a good movie, but nothing earth shattering and I certaintly don't understand the need to remake it. And the only way it can make money is if they target it as a Twilight type film, which they'll probably do.Kick-Ass star Chloe Moretz posted the first look of her in the remake called Let Me In on her official website.Here's the synopsis from the original:a fragile introverted boy, 12-year-old Oskar (Kåre Hedebrant) is regularly bullied by his stronger classmates but never strikes back. His wish for a friend comes true when he meets Eli (Lina Leandersson), also 12, who moves into the apartment next door with a man who is presumably her father. But coinciding with Eli's arrival is a series of disappearances and
See full article at LRM Online »

Austin Nordic Film Festival | February 27, 2010

Nordic (a.k.a. Scandinavian) Cinema – films made in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden – is known for its stark and foreboding landscapes, slow pacing, and strange humor that seems to toggle between absurdism, surrealism and just plain silly. Those are, admittedly, some over-arching stereotypes; but, personally, I most enjoy Nordic films that match those stereotypes to a tee. In fact, many of my favorite directors are from Nordic nations (Ingmar Bergman, Aki Kaurismäki, Carl Theodor Dreyer, Lasse Hallström, Lars von Trier, Lukas Moodysson, Susanne Bier, Risto Jarva, Erik Skjoldbjærg, Tomas Alfredson, Bent Hamer, Baltasar Kormákur, Dagur Kári, and Olaf de Fleur). I’m not sure what that says about me as a person? To the best of my knowledge, I am not of Nordic ancestry – so I cannot explain where I gained this strange affinity for Nordic cinema. In which case, I’ll just lay all of the blame
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

Pajba's Guide to What's Good for You: Snow Movies

  • Pajiba
In 1922, Robert J. Flaherty gave us Nanook of the North, one of my favourite silent films and an early example of a snow movie--that is, a movie that wouldn't be what it is without its wintry landscape. In some films, snow is incidental--a pretty backdrop or a minor metaphor (like the snowfall that blankets the Bride's duel with O-Ren Ishii in Kill Bill Vol. I). In others, a snowy climate is central to the story or sometimes even a character in its own right. Here are 10 movies that each use ice, snow, and cold in a specific way; together, they collectively demonstrate the range one symbol can have.

As with a typical Pajiba Guide, many genres are represented (don't worry Nanook fans -- silent film, documentary, and Inuit culture are all covered below in some form). And as with a typical Guide, apologies must be made for omitting many more
See full article at Pajiba »

Pat Seals of Flyleaf Shares His Top Ten Horror Films

As we've mentioned previously, November 10th is the release date of the band Flyleaf's new CD, entitled Memento Mori, and to help celebrate the occasion, their bass player, Pat Seals, has taken time out of his hectic schedule to prepare for Dread Central readers a list of his Top Ten favorite horror films.

Nothing relieves the stress of the holidays -- or anything really -- like a good horror flick, and Pat certainly has prepared an eclectic catalog that shows he knows his shit about our genre.

Without further ado, here's Pat's list (click each image to see the full poster):

1. The Addiction (1995) - Dir. Abel Ferrara, Starring Lili Taylor

This is my favorite vampire movie. It is the best. The best. Morality and the darkness of human nature are the focus, and Lili Taylor's performance is brutal. Plus, Christopher Walken waltzes in for a philosophical cameo. The
See full article at Dread Central »

Three More Join ‘Let Me In’ Cast As Shooting Begins

Whether fans of the original Swedish language film Let The Right One In like it or not, the American remake, entitled Let Me In, is firmly going ahead, with filming already started a couple of days ago in New Mexico. But just as that news appeared, another piece surfaced that three more actors have joined the cast: Elias Koteas (playing a policeman), Cara Bruono (playing the main character’s mother) and Sasha Barrese (playing a character called “Virginia”). They join the previously announced Kodi-Smit McPhee, Chloe Moritz, and Richard Jenkins.

The basic synopsis for Let Me In is as follows: “In the haunting and provocative Let Me In, an alienated 12-year-old boy (Smit-McPhee) befriends a mysterious young newcomer (Moretz) in his small New Mexico town and discovers an unconventional path to adulthood.” It’s based on the original book “Lat den Ratte Komma In” by Swedish author John Ajvide Lindqvist,
See full article at Screen Rant »
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