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Screen Talk: Bosworth fancies Tokyo lead role

Kate Bosworth is eyeing a starring role in 'Lost Girls and Love Hotels,' the next film from 'Young Victoria' director Jean-Marc Vallée. Bosworth is likely to land the role, should she want it, as she is also producing the project with heavyweight Hollywood backers Relativity Media. Nadia Conners wrote the screenplay, an adaptation of Catherine Hanrahan's 2006 novel of the same name in which a woman (Bosworth) tries to forget her past while working in Tokyo as an English specialist at a stewardess training institute by day and losing herself in a sex-and-drug-addled oblivion by night. She finds herself on the road to redemption when she becomes interested in a missing Western girl. The Westerner in Japan theme has long intrigued Hollywood, think of Ridley Scott's 'Black Rain' and Sofia Coppola's 'Lost in Translation'
See full article at The Independent »

Kate Bosworth falls for 'Love Hotels'

Kate Bosworth will star in and co-produce director Jean-Marc Vallee.s "Lost Girls and Love Hotels." Relativity Media is also producing. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Nadia Conners wrote the screenplay, which is adapted from Catherine Hanrahan's 2006 novel. The story centers on a woman (Bosworth) working in Tokyo as an English specialist at a stewardess training institute by day and losing herself in a sex-and drug-fueled world by night. She later becomes involved with the search for a missing Western girl.
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Kate Bosworth To Star In Love Hotels

Kate Bosworth is attached to star in Lost Girls And Love Hotels, the next feature film from The Young Victoria director Jean-Marc Vallée.

Nadia Conners adapted the screenplay from Catherine Hanrahan's 2006 novel, which tells the story of woman (Bosworth) who tries to forget her past while working in Tokyo as an English specialist at a stewardess training institute by day and losing herself in a sex- and drug-addled oblivion by night. She finds herself on the road to redemption when she becomes interested in a missing Western girl.

Bosworth is also producing along with Relativity Media, and the pic is due for release next year.

Georgine Waller

>> Real the whole article | on Screenrush - Tuesday 8 December 2009
See full article at Screenrush »

Kate Bosworth checks into 'Love Hotels'

Kate Bosworth is in talks to join the cast of "Lost Girls and Love Hotels," with Jean-Marc Vallee directing the film based on Catherine Hanrahan's novel. Nadia Conners wrote the screenplay.

The Hollywood Reporter says the film follows a troubled woman who works at a stewardess training institute in Tokyo and spends her nights in the dark world of sex and drugs until she learns about a missing girl.

Bosworth was last seen in "21," in which she delivered a relatively sexy, enjoyable performance. She also played Lois Lane in "Superman Returns," and she appeared in "Beyond the Sea" and "Bee Season."
See full article at screeninglog »

Bosworth Checks Into "Love Hotels"

Kate Bosworth is attached to star and produce "Lost Girls and Love Hotels" for Relativity Media says The Hollywood Reporter.

Based on Catherine Hanrahan's 2006 novel, the story centers on a woman (Bosworth) who tries to forget her past while working in Tokyo as an English specialist at a stewardess training institute by day and losing herself in a sex- and drug-addled oblivion by night.

She finds herself on the road to redemption when she becomes interested in a missing Western girl.

Jean-Marc Vallee ("The Young Victoria," "C.R.A.Z.Y.") is directing while Nadia Conners adapted the screenplay. J.J. Harris and Bruna Papandrea also produce.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Bosworth Checks Into "Love Hotels"

Kate Bosworth is attached to star and produce "Lost Girls and Love Hotels" for Relativity Media says The Hollywood Reporter.

Based on Catherine Hanrahan's 2006 novel, the story centers on a woman (Bosworth) who tries to forget her past while working in Tokyo as an English specialist at a stewardess training institute by day and losing herself in a sex- and drug-addled oblivion by night.

She finds herself on the road to redemption when she becomes interested in a missing Western girl.

Jean-Marc Vallee ("The Young Victoria," "C.R.A.Z.Y.") is directing while Nadia Conners adapted the screenplay. J.J. Harris and Bruna Papandrea also produce.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Kate Bosworth Becomes A Lost Girl

Kate Bosworth Becomes A Lost Girl
Kate Bosworth is off to lose herself in a whirl of sex and drugs in Japan! But, disappointingly for the tabloids, this isn’t her Christmas schedule but rather Lost Girls and Love Hotels, an adaptation of Catherine Hanrahan’s 2006 novel to be helmed by The Young Victoria director Jean-Marc Vallee.Bosworth plays Margaret, a Canadian woman who blots out her troubled past while working at an air stewardess training centre in Tokyo by day and playing fast and loose with sex and drugs by night. She takes interest in a missing Western girl and gradually gets pulled out of herself and into that mystery.The screenplay is written by Nadia Conners, whose only previous project to date is sharing writing/directing duties on Leonardo Di Caprio’s eco pic The 11th Hour.French-Canadian Vallee has form in getting edgy performances out of young leads, as evidenced in his 2005 coming-of-age story C.
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Kate Bosworth Looking to Stay in “Love Hotels”

“Young Victoria” director Jean-Marc Vallee has found his next project: “Lost Girls and Love Hotels.” Kate Bosworth is attached to star and is also producing with Relativity Media. Nadia Conners wrote the screenplay, which adapts Catherine Hanrahan’s 2006 novel. The story centers on a woman (Bosworth) who tries to forget her past while working in Tokyo as an English specialist at a stewardess training institute by day and losing herself in a sex- and drug-addled oblivion by night. She finds herself on the road to redemption when she becomes interested in a missing Western girl.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/film/news/e3ic79966a20ccff39219b2081adcbdf6f8
See full article at FilmNewsBriefs »

Kate Bosworth stays in 'Love Hotels'

Kate Bosworth stays in 'Love Hotels'
"Young Victoria" director Jean-Marc Vallee has found his next project: "Lost Girls and Love Hotels."

Kate Bosworth is attached to star and is also producing with Relativity Media.

Nadia Conners wrote the screenplay, which adapts Catherine Hanrahan's 2006 novel.

The story centers on a woman (Bosworth) who tries to forget her past while working in Tokyo as an English specialist at a stewardess training institute by day and losing herself in a sex- and drug-addled oblivion by night. She finds herself on the road to redemption when she becomes interested in a missing Western girl.

Vallee's "Victoria," which opens Dec. 18 via Bob Berney's Apparition and Graham Kings' Gk Films, is getting attention for its style and for the strong performance of Emily Blunt.

The idea with "Lost Girls" is for Icm-repped Vallee to draw a strong female performance and marry that with a setting that is gritty yet vibrant,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The 11th Hour

The 11th Hour
This review was written for the theatrical release of "The 11th Hour".NEW YORK -- "The 11th Hour" is an impassioned ecology-themed documentary that ultimately is more rewarding for informational than cinematic reasons. Produced and narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio, the film has the unfortunate effect of making the multiple-Oscar-nominated star seem somehow less charismatic than Al Gore. But while many might accuse it of preaching to the converted -- at least in terms of the audiences most likely to see it -- this is yet another important wake-up call that deserves respect.

Unfortunately, the vitally important message of first-time filmmakers Leila Conners Petersen and Nadia Conners is diluted by their rather unimaginative approach. It essentially consists of having dozens of talking heads delivering thoughtful and often apocalyptic commentary, interrupted by footage of ecological disasters (Katrina, etc.) presented "Koyaanisqatsi"-style. There also are portentous direct addresses to the camera by DiCaprio, but the frequent shots of the actor staring mournfully off into the distance at significant locations are less evocative than silly.

Despite its static presentation, the film is nonetheless engrossing thanks to the articulate and often fascinating commentary provided by such figures as university professors, scientists, environmentalists, journalists, such familiar faces as Stephen Hawking, former CIA director James Woolsey and even Mikhail Gorbachev (truly a renaissance man among Russian politicos).

While the film is necessarily downbeat in its accumulation of significant warning signs that the planet is indeed on the verge of environmental disaster, it thankfully also devotes a good portion of its running time to explicating numerous technological solutions to the dilemma. In the end, though, its main point is that what's truly needed in the way of change will only come through political means.

Jean-Pascal Beintus' score, augmented by songs from such bands as Sigur Ros, Cocteau Twins and Coldplay, provides suitably dire musical accompaniment.

THE 11TH HOUR

Warner Independent Pictures

Applian Way/GreenHour/Tree Media Group

Credits:

Director-screenwriters: Leila Conners Petersen, Nadia Conners

Producers: Leonardo DiCaprio, Chuck Castleberry, Brian Gerber, Pierre Andre Senizergues

Executive producers: Adam Lewis, Irmelin DiCaprio, Doyle Brunson

Director of photography: Andrew Rolands

Production designer: Nadia Conners

Music: Jean-Pascal Beintus

Co-producer: Leila Conners Petersen

Editors: Pietro Scalia, Luis Alvarez y Alvarez

Narrator: Leonardo DiCaprio

Running time -- 91 minutes

MPAA rating: PG

The 11th Hour

The 11th Hour
NEW YORK -- The 11th Hour is an impassioned ecology-themed documentary that ultimately is more rewarding for informational than cinematic reasons. Produced and narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio, the film has the unfortunate effect of making the multiple-Oscar-nominated star seem somehow less charismatic than Al Gore. But while many might accuse it of preaching to the converted -- at least in terms of the audiences most likely to see it -- this is yet another important wake-up call that deserves respect.

Unfortunately, the vitally important message of first-time filmmakers Leila Conners Petersen and Nadia Conners is diluted by their rather unimaginative approach. It essentially consists of having dozens of talking heads delivering thoughtful and often apocalyptic commentary, interrupted by footage of ecological disasters (Katrina, etc.) presented Koyaanisqatsi-style. There also are portentous direct addresses to the camera by DiCaprio, but the frequent shots of the actor staring mournfully off into the distance at significant locations are less evocative than silly.

Despite its static presentation, the film is nonetheless engrossing thanks to the articulate and often fascinating commentary provided by such figures as university professors, scientists, environmentalists, journalists, such familiar faces as Stephen Hawking, former CIA director James Woolsey and even Mikhail Gorbachev (truly a renaissance man among Russian politicos).

While the film is necessarily downbeat in its accumulation of significant warning signs that the planet is indeed on the verge of environmental disaster, it thankfully also devotes a good portion of its running time to explicating numerous technological solutions to the dilemma. In the end, though, its main point is that what's truly needed in the way of change will only come through political means.

Jean-Pascal Beintus' score, augmented by songs from such bands as Sigur Ros, Cocteau Twins and Coldplay, provides suitably dire musical accompaniment.

THE 11TH HOUR

Warner Independent Pictures

Applian Way/GreenHour/Tree Media Group

Credits:

Director-screenwriters: Leila Conners Petersen, Nadia Conners

Producers: Leonardo DiCaprio, Chuck Castleberry, Brian Gerber, Pierre Andre Senizergues

Executive producers: Adam Lewis, Irmelin DiCaprio, Doyle Brunson

Director of photography: Andrew Rolands

Production designer: Nadia Conners

Music: Jean-Pascal Beintus

Co-producer: Leila Conners Petersen

Editors: Pietro Scalia, Luis Alvarez y Alvarez

Narrator: Leonardo DiCaprio

Running time -- 91 minutes

MPAA rating: PG

DiCaprio brings green to Cote d'Azur

DiCaprio brings green to Cote d'Azur
Q&A with DiCaprio about 11th Hour

CANNES -- Leonardo DiCaprio wants to us to be very afraid of global warming. And then he wants us to do something about it.

In Cannes to promote his global-warming documentary The 11th Hour, DiCaprio admitted that his mega celebrity is a double-edged sword when it comes to drawing attention to the environmental issues addressed in the film.

"I'm completely aware of the fact, that my mere attachment being someone from quote-unquote Hollywood will garner certain amount of skepticism and criticism," DiCaprio said in an interview. "This is why I wanted to pose myself (in the film) as a concerned citizen, not as an expert. I ask the questions and allow these people (the environmental scientists) to give the answers."

DiCaprio co-wrote 11th Hour with directors Nadia Conners and Leila Conners Petersen and was involved in the production "from soup to nuts," according to the directors. "Everything from what the movie is about to who is in it to the issues discussed, every frame in that film was discussed by Leonardo, Nadia and I," Leila Conners Petersen said.

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