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Soundtracking: "Tully"

by Chris Feil

Despite being the most isolated character study of Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody’s collaboration, Tully still makes space for a subtle musical world inside its protagonist’s head. Tully is a story about motherhood and mental health, taking some big narrative risks as it moves towards healing. When music trickles in, it offers its own kind of mindful balm attuned to the psyche of Charlize Theron’s Marlo. It’s the most musically subtle of the Cody/Reitman empathy trilogy, but no less effective...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ranking Tully's Figures of Speech

Seven years after fucking up Charlize Theron’s silk, Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody teamed up again to fuck up just about every other fabric in her house in this year’s Tully. Here Theron plays Marlo, a soon-to-be mommy of three struggling to find any room for excitement or naps in her caffeine-deprived days. Enter Tully (Mackenzie Davis), the night nanny she hires to add some hours of sleep to her frustrations.

From the opening scene, Cody assures the audience she has no intention of grounding these characters in the reality that corresponds to them. Her script keeps this up throughout by frequently using figures of speech and occasional underwater reveries to buoy up the characters in their imagination. She reinforces the fantasies her script's players construct and dress themselves up in (from Tahitian home bars to cat ears headbands) with an equally rhetorical language. We've ranked enough of
See full article at FilmExperience »

Jennifer’S Body and the Monstrous Woman

  • DailyDead
Jennifer’s Body is a modern classic that didn’t properly find its audience until long after it hit theaters. Initially (and unfairly) maligned by both critics and audiences, cultural shifts have caused viewers to reexamine this film. Karyn Kusama and Diablo Cody’s female-driven tale of monsters and carnage has found new appreciation among horror fans, as we have begun to reevaluate both the film and its feminist themes. In addition to just being a fantastic horror movie, Jennifer’s Body is a fascinating example of an old, well-worn fear finding new life within a modern context.

In Jennifer’s Body, Jennifer (Megan Fox), the most beautiful, desired girl in her small town of Devil’s Kettle, finds herself undergoing a great many changes after she is the victim of a satanic ritual gone wrong. A rock band tries to perform a virgin sacrifice in exchange for fame and fortune,
See full article at DailyDead »

Selena Gomez, Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Tilda Swinton To Star In Jim Jarmusch’s Zom-Com The Dead Don’T Die

Jim Jarmusch’s new zombie comedy The Dead Don’t Die is underway in production with Focus Features. This is the writer-director’s third film with Focus having previously made Broken Flowers (2005) and The Limits of Control (2009) together. Joshua Astrachan and Carter Logan will produce.

The cast is led by many past Jarmusch collaborators including Academy-Award® nominee Bill Murray (Broken Flowers), Adam Driver (Paterson), Academy-Award® nominee Chloë Sevigny (Broken Flowers), Academy-Award® winner Tilda Swinton, Steve Buscemi (Mystery Train), as well as Selena Gomez in her first Jarmusch feature.

Focus Features and Universal Pictures International will distribute the film worldwide.

Current and upcoming domestic releases from Focus include Jason Reitman’s new comedy Tully, starring Charlize Theron and written by Diablo Cody; Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, director Morgan Neville’s documentary on Mister Rogers; Lenny Abrahamson’s atmospheric thriller The Little Stranger; Joel Edgerton’s coming-of-age and coming-out drama Boy Erased,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Focus Features Announces Start of Production on Jim Jarmusch’s Zombie Comedy The Dead Don’T Die, Co-Starring Tilda Swinton, Bill Murray & Adam Driver

After taking a unique storytelling angle on vampires in Only Lovers Left Alive, Jim Jarmusch is now turning his attention to zombies in The Dead Don't Die, which just began production with Focus Features and a cast that includes Tilda Swinton, Bill Murray, and Adam Driver:

Press Release: New York, NY, July 13, 2018 – Jim Jarmusch’s new zombie comedy The Dead Don’t Die is underway in production with Focus Features. This is the writer-director’s third film with Focus having previously made Broken Flowers (2005) and The Limits of Control (2009) together. Joshua Astrachan and Carter Logan will produce.

The cast is led by many past Jarmusch collaborators including Academy-Award® nominee Bill Murray (Broken Flowers), Adam Driver (Paterson), Academy-Award® nominee Chloë Sevigny (Broken Flowers), Academy-Award® winner Tilda Swinton, Steve Buscemi (Mystery Train), as well as Selena Gomez in her first Jarmusch feature.

Focus Features and Universal Pictures International will distribute the film worldwide.
See full article at DailyDead »

Podcast: Disobedience and Tully

An intimate convo this week as Nathaniel R and Nick Davis discuss recent flicks. This was recorded right before Nathaniel's birthday but we are late uploading it. Here it is now for your enjoyment. Lots of Tully and Disobedience talk (among other films) all without spoilers if you haven't yet caught those early release gems!

Index (40 minutes)

00:01 Silliness about Nathaniel's Birthday

03:30 Favorites of 2018 thus far including Diablo Cody & Charlize Theron's brilliance in Tully

10:25 A long anedcote-filled conversation about Sebastian Lelio's Disobedience starring Rachel Weisz. It's quite discussable from a number of angles

25:00 On Chesil Beach, Deadpool 2 and Ready Player One

30:15 Let the Sunshine In, and Grace Jones, Bloodlight and Bami

34:45 More randomness including Book Club and the exquisite beauty of Michelle Pfeiffer in Wolf

You can listen to the podcast here at the bottom of the post or download from iTunes. Continue the conversations in the comments,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Mackenzie Davis Vows She Won’t Abandon Indies After Starring in That ‘Terminator’ Reboot

Mackenzie Davis Vows She Won’t Abandon Indies After Starring in That ‘Terminator’ Reboot
When actors are asked about their career motivations, they often default to “just wanting to do something different.” Judging by her resume, however, Mackenzie Davis really means it. Over the course of only seven years and just over two dozen roles, the actress has already done a little bit of everything, sliding from indies to mainstreams films and back again, and that’s not about to change, even with Davis stepping into her most high-profile role yet.

Best known for her work in indies like “Breathe In” and “Almost Shine,” the actress is currently filming her biggest film to date: a “Terminator” reboot in which she’s rumored to be playing a “soldier-assassin from the future.” It’s the kind of movie that seems poised to catapult the 31-year-old performer into a different stratosphere, but before that, she’s still diligently stumping for her latest indie.

That role — likely the
See full article at Indiewire »

Toni Collette Is Explosive, but ‘Hereditary’ Is Horrific: How Genre Bias Can Kill Oscar Chances

Toni Collette Is Explosive, but ‘Hereditary’ Is Horrific: How Genre Bias Can Kill Oscar Chances
Winning any Oscar nomination demands that enough Academy voters see the movie in the first place. A demanding film can make the cut — “The Shape of Water,” “12 Years a Slave,” “Moonlight,” and “Get Out” prove that — but in order to go the distance, they first had to become must-see films. For most genre movies, that’s a bridge too far.

Far more horror films have been nominated for Oscars than have won. A scary movie needs serious elevation to score Oscar nods: Either it penetrates the culture as a drama, or boasts such amazing acting or production values that its quality can’t be denied.

Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” rose above its horror DNA thanks to the preferential ballot and to an expanded younger and more diverse Academy membership. This timely racial thriller, which started production during the Obama administration and was released in the age of Trump,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Toni Collette Is Explosive, but ‘Hereditary’ Is Horrific: How Genre Bias Can Kill Oscar Chances

Toni Collette Is Explosive, but ‘Hereditary’ Is Horrific: How Genre Bias Can Kill Oscar Chances
Winning any Oscar nomination demands that enough Academy voters see the movie in the first place. A demanding film can make the cut — “The Shape of Water,” “12 Years a Slave,” “Moonlight,” and “Get Out” prove that — but in order to go the distance, they first had to become must-see films. For most genre movies, that’s a bridge too far.

Far more horror films have been nominated for Oscars than have won. A scary movie needs serious elevation to score Oscar nods: Either it penetrates the culture as a drama, or boasts such amazing acting or production values that its quality can’t be denied.

Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” rose above its horror DNA thanks to the preferential ballot and to an expanded younger and more diverse Academy membership. This timely racial thriller, which started production during the Obama administration and was released in the age of Trump,
See full article at Indiewire »

Did you enjoy 'Mermay'? A few words on "Splash" and "Siren"

by Nathaniel

You guys. I only just recently learned about "Mermay" in which you celebrate mermaids during the month of May. How did I not know about this? We could have been celebrating mermaids in film and television all month long! The least we could have done is pay tribute to Tully's mermaid dream imagery. Because that film did Not get enough attention. Jason Reitman + Diablo Cody + Charlize Theron = dream team (see also: Young Adult)...

I thought I could whirlpool up a top ten list of movie mermaids but realized I hadn't seen some key texts like Mr Peabody and the Mermaid (1948), Night Tide (1961), the silent film The Mermaid (1904) and a few others. Sadly merman films seem all but nonexistent... 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Film Review: ‘Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché’

Film Review: ‘Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché’
There’s an alarming degree of disingenuousness, or perhaps merely naiveté, permeating “Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché.” To begin with, there’s that title, “The Untold Story,” which ignores a number of earlier documentaries not to mention the significant amount of scholarship on pioneering filmmaker Alice Guy-Blaché. Also omitted is any mention of the 2009 Gaumont and Kino DVD box sets that made 66 of her films available. These are what can be called inconvenient truths, for Pamela B. Green, director of “Be Natural,” is on a mission to discover why — supposedly — no one has ever heard of Alice Guy-Blaché.

As Green tells it, the reason is pure and simple: Because she was a woman, Guy-Blaché was written out of the history books. That’s not entirely wrong. Alice Guy, as she was then known, was present at the very start of the film industry and played a crucial
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché’
There’s an alarming degree of disingenuousness, or perhaps merely naiveté, permeating “Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché.” To begin with, there’s that title, “The Untold Story,” which ignores a number of earlier documentaries not to mention the significant amount of scholarship on pioneering filmmaker Alice Guy-Blaché. Also omitted is any mention of the 2009 Gaumont and Kino DVD box sets that made 66 of her films available. These are what can be called inconvenient truths, for Pamela B. Green, director of “Be Natural,” is on a mission to discover why — supposedly — no one has ever heard of Alice Guy-Blaché.

As Green tells it, the reason is pure and simple: Because she was a woman, Guy-Blaché was written out of the history books. That’s not entirely wrong. Alice Guy, as she was then known, was present at the very start of the film industry and played a crucial
See full article at Variety »

Regional Theater Review: ‘Jagged Little Pill’

  • Variety
It’s a risky business, making a musical not from a story demanding to be told but from a set of songs merely available to be used. “Jagged Little Pill,” American Repertory Theater’s world premiere based on the 1995 Grammy-winning alt-rock smash, triumphantly avoids the pitfalls. Always engaging, often moving and even rousing, the show boasts dramatic interest and integrity on its own theatrical terms, courtesy of director Diane Paulus, first-time librettist Diablo Cody and that peerless, soulful balladeer of the modern Western condition, Alanis Morissette.

The smash-hit album, written in collaboration with Glen Ballard (also credited here), garnered praise for its suavely blended musical influences and deeply-held personal feelings. It also attracted brickbats from critics objecting to excessive insularity and unseemly anger, but such charges seem baseless now. Heard at a 20+ year remove, the songs of “Jagged Little Pill” impress as sage rather than wantonly ferocious, and prescient in
See full article at Variety »

Peter Bart: Why Has Female Empowerment Led To So Many Downer Roles For Women?

Peter Bart: Why Has Female Empowerment Led To So Many Downer Roles For Women?
The #MeToo movement notwithstanding, I’ve been worried about women lately, perhaps because I’ve been seeing too many movies. At a time when women are achieving more muscle in managing their lives and careers, the female characters they portray in movies lack both muscle and self-esteem. Women need a movement – any sort of movement. They also need help at the box office.

Let’s start with Melissa McCarthy, Charlize Theron and Amy Schumer. In Spy, McCarthy three years ago displayed hilariously lethal skills, but in her new Life of the Party she’s a mopey mom whose daughter is embarrassed by her and whose husband dumps her. Meanwhile, Theron, the delectably homicidal heroine of Atomic Blonde, becomes a downbeat, defeated housewife in Tully. Schumer, who devours men in Trainwreck, is dopey and delusional in I Feel Pretty, cast as a woman whose self-esteem is tied to her (imagined) svelte figure.
See full article at Deadline »

The Casual Cinecast Talks Jason Reitman's Tully!

  • Cinelinx
The Casual Cinecast spent their Mother's Day weekend watching Charlize Theron mom it up in Jason Reitman's latest film, Tully. 

Tully is the newest collaboration between Jason Reitman (Director), Diablo Cody (Writer) and Charlize Theron (Lead Actress). It tells the story of Charlize Theron as a struggling mother who hires a night nanny named Tully (Mackenzie Davis) to help care for her newborn infant. Listen in as we give our spoiler free opinions followed by a deep dive, spoiler heavy discussion of this unrelenting and realistic depiction of the experience of being and mother and having a newborn. 

Of course, each week we start by discussing the TV and Film news we find interesting as well as the things we've been watching between episodes! Chris discovers a Looney Tunes-esque anime on CrunchyRoll called Tonari no Seki-kun: The Master of Killing Time while Mike has been staying up to date
See full article at Cinelinx »

Festival Feature: The Films of the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival

New York City – The 17th Tribeca Film Festival wrapped a couple weeks ago and the award winning films of the festival have been named. Patrick McDonald of HollywoodChicago.com was there for the first week of Tribeca, and files his personal best of the films that he experienced.

The films are either in release or are still looking for distributors, but many of them are already scheduled for 2018 theatrical runs. The Tribeca Film Festival screenings occur mostly in the Chelsea neighborhood, steps from the famed Hotel Chelsea (now under renovation).

The following are the prime 11 of the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival…

Bathtubs Over Broadway

’Bathtubs Over Broadway,’ Directed by Dava Whisenant

Photo credit: Tribeca Film Festival

When is the last time you really saw a miracle take place? The story of “Bathtubs Over Broadway” is one such happenstance, as a disaffected comedy writer named Steve Young unwittingly stumbled upon a lost piece of 1950s/’60s art…
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Diablo Cody on ‘Tully’, Motherhood, Collaborating with Jason Reitman, and That Ending

One of my favorite films from this year’s Sundance Film Festival was director Jason Reitman’s Tully. Written by Diablo Cody, the film stars Charlize Theron as Marlo, a mother of three, including a newborn, who is gifted a night nanny by her brother, played by Mark Duplass. Hesitant to the extravagance at first, Marlo comes to form a special bond with the thoughtful, surprising, and sometimes challenging young nanny named Tully (Mackenzie Davis). While the previous pairings of Reitman and Cody have led to some great films, Tully is my favorite of the bunch. It …
See full article at Collider.com »

Blueprints: "Tully"

For this upcoming Mother’s Day weekend, Jorge takes a look at the depictions of the hardships of motherhood in Diablo Cody and Jason’s Reitman’s latest joint.

At this point it may be an overstatement, but motherhood is not easy. As it turns out, taking care of another, much smaller living and breathing human being requires more time, attention and energy than one sole human being is able to provide. Tully, among many other things, is an examination of the mental toll that motherhood takes on a person.

Let’s take a look at the tools that Diablo Cody’s script uses to portray the everyday hassle, tediousness and exhaustion that Charlize Theron’s Marlo has to endure, before Tully comes in and rescues her...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Sony Buys Hugh Jackman’s Gary Hart Biopic ‘The Front Runner’

Sony Pictures has acquired worldwide rights to Jason Reitman’s “The Front Runner,” starring Hugh Jackman as presidential candidate Gary Hart, along with Vera Farmiga and J.K. Simmons.

The studio, which made the announcement Thursday, said it plans a fall release timed to coincide with award season and election coverage.

The Front Runner” chronicles the rise and fall of Hart, a charismatic U.S. Senator from Colorado, who was considered the frontrunner for the 1988 Democratic presidential nomination when his campaign was sidelined by the story of an extramarital relationship with Donna Rice. In what may have been the first merger of tabloid journalism and political journalism, Hart was forced to drop out of the race.

Reitman said, “Having grown up wandering around the Columbia lot as a kid, it is a particular thrill to bring The ‘Front Runner’ back home to the first studio I can remember. I cannot wait
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sony Buys Hugh Jackman’s Gary Hart Biopic ‘The Front Runner’

  • Variety
Sony Pictures has acquired worldwide rights to Jason Reitman’s “The Front Runner,” starring Hugh Jackman as presidential candidate Gary Hart, along with Vera Farmiga and J.K. Simmons.

The studio, which made the announcement Thursday, said it plans a fall release timed to coincide with award season and election coverage.

The Front Runner” chronicles the rise and fall of Hart, a charismatic U.S. Senator from Colorado, who was considered the frontrunner for the 1988 Democratic presidential nomination when his campaign was sidelined by the story of an extramarital relationship with Donna Rice. In what may have been the first merger of tabloid journalism and political journalism, Hart was forced to drop out of the race.

Reitman said, “Having grown up wandering around the Columbia lot as a kid, it is a particular thrill to bring The ‘Front Runner’ back home to the first studio I can remember. I cannot wait
See full article at Variety »
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