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Berlin Unveils Documentary Jury

Berlin Unveils Documentary Jury
The Berlin International Film Festival has unveiled the three-person jury that will judge the documentary films in this year's selection.

Fast Food Nation author Eric Schlosser, who worked as a producer on Richard Linklater’s screen adaptation of his nonfiction best-selling exposé of the industrial food industry; German documentary director Ulrike Ottinger; and Cintia Gil, co-director of Portuguese documentary film festival Doclisboa, will select the winner of this year's Glashutte Original Documentary Award.

In addition to Fast Food Nation, Schlosser was a producer on Robert Kenner's 2008 Oscar-nominated doc Food Inc. and Paul Thomas Anderson's drama There Will Be Blood (2007),...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!’
Is fast food good for you? The answer is obvious, to the point that the question sounds insane, and one reason it’s obvious is that Morgan Spurlock’s “Super Size Me,” back in 2004, colored in the answer in a highly entertaining and informative way. Spurlock’s 30-day-McDonald’s-binge documentary was an experiment that took the form of a gluttonous fantasy (what would it be like to pig out on McDonald’s every day?), and it demonstrated what any halfway informed person already knew: that fast food, as good as it tastes, is bad for your heart and (maybe) your soul — that it makes you fat, sluggish, and demonstrably unhealthy.

So what’s left for Spurlock to demonstrate in “Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!”? A lot more than you’d expect. As it turns out, the reality of fast food — that it’s succulent addictive junk — is now competing with a counter-myth: that it’s all
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017
Dozens of movies are hitting Netflix during the dog days of summer (click here for a complete list), but the sheer variety of new titles can be daunting. Movies are long, time is short, and indecision is brutal, so — in the hopes of helping you out — here are the seven best films that are coming to Netflix in August.

7. “Practical Magic” (1998)

Okay, so “Practical Magic” isn’t a “good movie” in the traditional sense…or in any other sense, for that matter. But it’s a perfect Netflix movie, which is another beast entirely. An incredible time capsule — and bottomless gif resource — from an ancient epoch that historians refer to as “1998,” this essential relic tells the story of sisters Sally (Sandra Bullock) and Gillian (Nicole Kidman) Owens, twin witches who are effectively cursed to remain single forever.

Did I mention that it was directed by Griffin Dunne? Did I mention that it was nominated for a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for including a Faith Hill song on the soundtrack? Did I mention that it features a scene in which Dianne Wiest and Stockard Channing use their secret powers to blend alcoholic drinks in order to lubricate a singalong set to Harry Nilsson’s “Put the Lime in the Coconut”? “Practical Magic” was kind of a blip when it first opened, but it would shake our culture to its skeleton if it came out today. A remake feels inevitable, but in the meantime, the original makes for perfect streaming on a lazy August afternoon. Better yet, add it to your queue and swing back once Halloween rolls around.

Begins streaming August 1st.

6. “The Bomb” (2016)

“the bomb” was one of the most exciting, unclassifiable experiences on the festival circuit last year, but the sheer magnitude of the project made it unclear where it might live once it had finished traveling the world, or if it would be possible for the public to see it. Fortunately, the answers to those questions turned out to be “everywhere” and “very.” Here’s IndieWire’s Steve Greene on the 59-minute film into which this enormous piece of experimental art has been newly reshaped:

Read More‘the bomb’ Review: New Doc on Netflix Is a Surreal Music Video About the End of the World

Directed by Kevin Ford, Smriti Keshari, and Eric Schlosser, this experimental, sensory history of the nuclear bomb is a staggering look at the world’s most destructive weapon and the lessons of almost eight decades that some still choose to ignore. Threading together modern-day news footage, Cold War era safety videos and grainy archival peeks into the construction process, “the bomb” looks at nuclear weapons in their myriad historic forms. Foregoing the usual talking head interviews or explanatory narration, the one piece of connective tissue throughout the film, besides the subject itself, is the film’s score, from Los Angeles electronic minimalist outfit The Acid. Throughout a harrowing parade of images and fleeting moments of whimsy, the droning, pulsating music underneath brings an alternating sense of dread and power.

Begins streaming August 1st.

5. “Cloud Atlas” (2012)

It’s easy to make fun of “Cloud Atlas,” and not just because one of the six characters that Tom Hanks plays is pretty much a live-action Jar Jar Binks. Tom Tykwer and the Wachowskis’ cosmically ambitious sci-fi epic is — in its own delirious way — one of the most earnest movies ever made. Adapted from David Mitchell’s novel of the same name, and now something of an obvious precursor to the Wachowskis’ Netflix series “Sense 8,” this symphonic story of spiritual connection spans from 1849 to 2321 in a go-for-broke attempt to crystallize the effects that one life can have on countless others.

Controversially casting individual actors in multiple roles (with many of the film’s most famous stars disguising themselves as different races and genders), “Cloud Atlas” fearlessly envisions our world as a place where bodies are temporary, but love is eternal. It’s a lot to swallow, but our collective cynicism only makes the movie more valuable, and more important to have on hand.

Begins streaming August 1st.

4. “Donald Cried” (2016)

Kris Avedisian flew under the radar when “Donald Cried” made the rounds last year — his self-directed turn as the most deeply committed man-child since “Clifford” may have been just a bit too raw and cringe-inducing for any major traction — but it’s only a matter of time before people discover one of the most fearless performances in recent memory. Here’s IndieWire’s Eric Kohn on a future dark comedy classic:

The obnoxious man-child is a common trope in American comedies, but few recent examples can match the hilariously unsettling presence of Donald Treebeck, the obnoxious central figure played by writer-director Kris Avedisian in his effective black comedy “Donald Cried.” While the story technically unfolds from the perspective of his old teen pal Peter (Jesse Wakeman), who returns to their Rhode Island suburbs from his Wall Street career after his grandmother dies, Donald welcomes his reluctant friend back to their world and won’t leave him alone. Avedisian gives Danny McBride a run for his money in this pitch-perfect embodiment of a wannabe charmer all too eager to remain the center of attention. Hardly reinventing the wheel, “Donald Cried” nevertheless spins it faster than usual, taking cues from its memorably irritating protagonist. Beneath its entertainment value, the movie also hints at the tragedy of aimless adulthood.

Begins streaming August 15th.

3. “The Matrix” (1999)

At this point, “The Matrix” has effectively become immune to any sort of qualitative criticism; there’s no use arguing that it’s “good” or “bad” or somewhere in between, it simply is. Less a movie than a cornerstone of contemporary pop culture (for better or worse), the Wachowskis’ absurdly influential orgy of mind-blowing action and high school philosophy arrived at the tail end of the 20th century in order to help define the 21st. Its aesthetic impact on the current breed of blockbusters is self-evident, but its more profound contributions have been largely off-screen, as the film brought futurism to the masses in a way that’s only possible to trace through its most unfortunate side effects (e.g. the diseased misogyny of “red pill” thinking).

Of course, “No can be told what the Matrix is. You have to see it for yourself.” Now that it’s on Netflix, it couldn’t be easier to do just that.

Begins streaming August 1st.

2. “Jackie Brown” (1997)

Every hardcore Tarantino fan’s favorite Tarantino film, “Jackie Brown” is more than just an homage to blaxploitation or the best Elmore Leonard adaptation ever made (sorry, “Out of Sight”), it’s also something of a tribute to all of the crime writer’s work and the scuzzy but soulful ethos that bound it together. To this day, “Jackie Brown” remains a major outlier for Qt. For one thing, it’s based on pre-existing material. For another, it’s got a bonafide sex scene. Last but not least, it’s about recognizably human characters who have genuine depth, who have real lives that feel as though they continue beyond the confines of a movie screen (no disrespect to the cartoonish avatars who populate Tarantino’s later, more solipsistic work — they serve their purpose to perfection).

Pam Grier is spectacular in the title role of a flight attendant with a drug smuggling side hustle. Robert Forster is heartbreaking as lovelorn bondsman Max Cherry. Hell, even Robert De Niro is phenomenal, the iconic actor beautifully playing against his legend by inhabiting the film’s most pathetic and disposable character. For anyone put off by the blockbuster scale of Tarantino’s recent work, “Jackie Brown” is a rock-solid reminder of his genius for elevating fevered pastiche into singular pathos. And the soundtrack owns.

Begins streaming August 1st.

1. “All These Sleepless Nights” (2016)

It would be reductive and unfair to say that Michal Marczak’s “All These Sleepless Nights” is the film that Terrence Malick has been trying to make for the last 10 years, but it certainly feels that way while you’re watching it. A mesmeric, free-floating odyssey that wends its way through a hazy year in the molten lives of two Polish twentysomethings, this unclassifiable wonder obscures the divide between fiction and documentary until the distinction is ultimately irrelevant.

Read MoreReview: ‘All These Sleepless Nights’ Is the Movie That Terrence Malick Has Been Trying to Make

Unfolding like a plotless reality show that was shot by Emmanuel Lubezki, this lucid dream of a movie paints an unmoored portrait of a city in the throes of an orgastic reawakening. From the opening images of fireworks exploding over downtown Warsaw, to the stunning final glimpse of Marczak’s main subject — Krzysztof Baginski (playing himself, as everyone does), who looks and moves like a young Baryshnikov — twirling between an endless row of stopped cars during the middle of a massive traffic jam, the film is high on the spirit of liberation. More than just a hypnotically hyper-real distillation of what it means to be young, “All These Sleepless Nights” is a haunted vision of what it means to have been young.

Begins streaming August 15th.

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See full article at Indiewire »

‘the bomb’ Review: New Doc on Netflix Is a Surreal Music Video About the End of the World

‘the bomb’ Review: New Doc on Netflix Is a Surreal Music Video About the End of the World
When it premiered at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival, “the bomb” was presented as a live concert experience, giving the hour long documentary an immersive, communal feel. Now, over a year later and released into a strikingly different world, “the bomb” still keeps that same level of potency, even away from the confines of a theater. Directed by Kevin Ford, Smriti Keshari, and Eric Schlosser, this experimental, sensory history of the nuclear bomb is a staggering look at the world’s most destructive weapon and the lessons of almost eight decades that some still choose to ignore.

Threading together modern-day news footage, Cold War era safety videos and grainy archival peeks into the construction process, “the bomb” looks at nuclear weapons in their myriad historic forms. It covers the standard historical hallmarks of assembling, testing and launching these armed missiles, but it also considers the cultural hold that they’ve had
See full article at Indiewire »

Writers Guild Awards 2017: Complete Winners List!

Let's hear it for the writers!

The Writer's Guild of America held their annual awards show on Sunday night at the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles, where Barry Jenkins' Moonlight, The People vs. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and Donald Glover's breakout series, Atlanta were among those recognized for their achievement of the written word.

Read on below to see the full list of winners.

More: John Legend, Justin Timberlake and Lin-Manuel Miranda Among 2017 Oscars Performers

Film Winners

Original Screenplay

Moonlight, Screenplay by Barry Jenkins, Story by Tarell Alvin McCraney; A24

Adapted Screenplay

Arrival, Screenplay by Eric Heisserer; Based on the Story “Story of Your Life” by Ted Chiang; Paramount Pictures

Documentary Screenplay

Command and Control, Telescript by Robert Kenner & Eric Schlosser, Story by Brian Pearle and Kim Roberts; Based on the book Command and Control by Eric Schlosser; American Experience Films

Television And New Media Winners

Drama Series

The Americans, Written
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

WGA winners include “Arrival” and “Moonlight”

Yesterday evening, the Writers Guild of America handed out their awards, marking one of the season’s final precursor stops and last guild ceremony. As with many of the guilds this year, a slight curveball was tossed our way, namely in that one potential frontrunner is nominated in a different category at Oscar. You’ll see what I mean shortly, along with a few other precursors that went down over the weekend. Ballots for the Academy Awards are due by tomorrow, so voters are making their final decisions literally as you read this. It’s very much the moment of truth, with the results of it all less than a week away now… Below you will see not just the WGA winners, but also the Cinema Audio Society, which basically predict Best Sound Mixing at the Oscars, as well as the victors from the Makeup Artists and Hair Stylists guild.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Writers Guild Award Analysis: It’s Still ‘Moonlight’ and ‘Manchester’ At the Oscars

Writers Guild Award Analysis: It’s Still ‘Moonlight’ and ‘Manchester’ At the Oscars
The Writers Guild Awards and the Academy writing nominees always don’t line up; many films are ineligible. This year, those included Oscar-writing nominees “Lion” and “The Lobster.”

This year, the WGA and the Academy differed dramatically. While the WGA deemed “Moonlight” and “Loving” as Original Screenplays, the Academy considered both as Adapted; only “Moonlight” landed a nomination.

At the WGA, as at the BAFTAs, Barry Jenkins’ script for “Moonlight” competed for the Original Screenplay Award against both Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea” and Damien Chazelle’s “La La Land.” Unlike the BAFTAs, Jenkins emerged the winner over Lonergan, a sign of strength for “Moonlight,” which is nominated for eight Oscars.

Read More: Yes, Damien Chazelle’s ‘La La Land’ Really Will Win Director and Picture Oscars — Here’s Why

However, in the Oscars’ Original Screenplay contest, lauded playwright and Oscar-nominated screenwriter Lonergan (“You Can Count On Me,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

2017 Writers Guild Awards Winners: ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Arrival,’ ‘Atlanta’ and ‘The Americans’ Win Big

2017 Writers Guild Awards Winners: ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Arrival,’ ‘Atlanta’ and ‘The Americans’ Win Big
Live from New York! And also Los Angeles! It’s the 2017 Writers Guild Awards, honoring the best in writing for television, film and new media. This year’s big winners included some of the season’s most lauded productions — including “Moonlight,” “Arrival,” “Atlanta” and “The Americans.”

While “Moonlight” and “Arrival” will compete against each other in the Adapted Screenplay category at the Oscars, they were entered in the WGA Awards in different categories, allowing both to make off with an award. “The Americans” pulled out a win for Drama Series, while “Atlanta” snapped up both Comedy Series and New Series. Other winners included “Command and Control,” “Saturday Night Live,” “BoJack Horseman” and “This Is Us.”

Read More: The IndieWire 2016-17 Awards Season Winners Guide

Check out our full list of winners — noted in bold — all updated live as the awards were announced at concurrent ceremonies in New York and Los Angeles this evening.
See full article at Indiewire »

WGA unveils winners in 2017 awards

  • ScreenDaily
WGA unveils winners in 2017 awards
The Writers Guild Of America, West and East held simultaneous ceremonies on both coasts on Sunday night.

Barry Jenkins enhanced his Oscar prospects with a win in the best original screenplay category for Moonlight based on a story by Tarell Alvin McCraney.

A24’s acclaimed drama beat Damien Chazelle’s La La Land and triumphed in a strong category that included Manchester By The Sea, Loving, and Hell Or High Water.

Eric Heisserer won the best adapted screenplay for Arrival, vanquishing heavyweight rivals Fences and Hidden Figures. Moonlight and Arrival compete for the adapted screenplay Oscar on Sunday.

Key categories appear below. For a full list of winners, click here.

Film Winnersoriginal Screenplay

Moonlight

Screenplay by Barry Jenkins, story by Tarell Alvin McCraney.

Adapted Screenplay

Arrival

Screenplay by Eric Heisserer; Based on the story ‘Story Of Your Life’ by Ted Chiang.

Documentary Screenplay

Command And Control

Telescript by Robert Kenner and Eric Schlosser, story by [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'the bomb': Film Review | Berlin 2017

'the bomb': Film Review | Berlin 2017
“Now I am become death, destroyer of worlds,” is the quote that J. Robert Oppenheimer famously thought of when he presided over the first successful atomic bomb test back in 1945. Over seventy years later, we are still very much on the brink of such mass destruction, with roughly 15,000 nuclear weapons held by eight countries, not to mention those nations now trying to become nuclear powers themselves. And let’s not forget whose hand is currently on the button in the United States.

In the experimental montage film the bomb, author Eric Schlosser – whose 2014 book Command and Control...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Visit films to sell Berlinale selections 'the bomb', 'Dayveon'

  • ScreenDaily
Visit films to sell Berlinale selections 'the bomb', 'Dayveon'
Exclusive: Ryan Kampe arrives at the Efm with a sales roster that includes Sundance premieres Family Life and Columbus, Rotterdam entries X500 and Rat Film, and Oscar-nominated Tanna.

Kevin Ford, Smriti Keshari, and Eric Schlosser’s Berlinale Special selection documentary the bomb screens on Friday and explores the power and fascination of nuclear weapons. the bomb premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival last year as a multimedia installation.

Amman Abbasi’s feature directorial debut Dayveon premiered at Sundance last month and screens in Forum on Friday. Newcomer Devin Blackmon plays the eponymous 13-year-old grieving the loss of his older brother who falls in with a local gang. FilmRise acquired North American rights after the premiere in Park City.

Alicia Scherson and Cristián Jiménez’s Family Life premiered at Sundance before going to the Rotterdam Film Festival. Jorge Becker, Gabriela Arancibia, Blanca Lewin and Cristián Carvajal star in the story of a lonely fabulist who concocts a tale
See full article at ScreenDaily »

11 Surprising Facts About the Real History of McDonald’s

11 Surprising Facts About the Real History of McDonald’s
Richard and Maurice McDonald revolutionized the way that billions of people around the world eat – and produce – fast food.

The business they started in the 1930s as a hot dog stand near a racetrack is now valued at over $110 billion with more than 36,000 locations in over 100 countries around the world.

But McDonald’s wouldn’t be the global force it is today if not for the man who bought the family business and turned it into an empire.

The Founder, starring Michael Keaton, tells the story of Ray Kroc, a one-time traveling salesman who joined McDonald’s as a franchise
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Berlinale Adds New Films Starring Catherine Deneuve, Geoffrey Rush

Berlinale Adds New Films Starring Catherine Deneuve, Geoffrey Rush
New films from Stanley Tucci, Martin Provost and China’s Liu Jian complete the Berlinale’s competition lineup and will see their world premieres at the next month’s festival.

Only Liu’s film, the animated “Have a Nice Day,” will actually compete for the Golden Bear. “Final Portrait”, Tucci’s biopic of Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti with actor Geoffrey Rush, and “Midwife,” starring Catherine Frot and Catherine Deneuve, are part of the official competition section but will not actually vie for the main awards.

In all, the competition lineup features 24 films, all but two of which will have their world premieres at the festival and 18 of which will compete for the prestigious Golden and Silver Bears.

The festival also announced the Berlinale Special, which will once again present a selection of television series as part of the official program. It marks the third time TV programming has featured at Berlin,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlin sets competition, adds Amazon and BBC drama premieres

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin sets competition, adds Amazon and BBC drama premieres
Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the festival in Out Of Competition berths are Stanley Tucci-directed Final Portrait and Catherine Deneuve drama Sage Femme.

James Gray’s The Lost City Of Z will have its interntional premiere while documentary The Trial: The State of Russia vs Oleg Sentsov will have its world premiere.

Among TV world premieres are Amazon’s Patriot and BBC One’s SS-gb.

In total, 18 of the 24 films selected for Competitionwill be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin finalises competition, adds TV premieres

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin finalises competition, adds TV premieres
Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the competition are

18 of the 24 films selected for Competition will be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

The Berlinale Special will present recent works by contemporary filmmakers, documentaries, and extraordinary formats, as well as brand new series from around the world.

Berlinale Special Galas will be held at the Friedrichstadt-Palast and Zoo Palast. Other Special premieres will take place at the Kino International. Moderated discussions will follow the screenings at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year. Audiences
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Writers Guild announces nominations for 2017 WGA Awards

The Writers Guild of America has announced the nominations for the 2017 WGA Awards for Best Original Screenplay, Adapted Screenplay and Documentary Screenplay, with the biggest surprise being Deadpool’s inclusion in the Adapted Screenplay category. Could it repeat the feat when the Academy Award nominations are announced?

Original Screenplay

Hell or High Water, Written by Taylor Sheridan

La La Land, Written by Damien Chazelle

Loving, Written by Jeff Nichols

Manchester by the Sea, Written by Kenneth Lonergan

Moonlight, Written by Barry Jenkins, Story by Tarell McCraney

Adapted Screenplay

Arrival, Screenplay by Eric Heisserer

Deadpool, Written by Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick

Fences, Screenplay by August Wilson

Hidden Figures, Screenplay by Allison Schroeder and Theodore Melfi

Nocturnal Animals, Screenplay by Tom Ford

Documentary Screenplay

Author: The Jt LeRoy Story, Written by Jeff Feuerzeig

Command and Control, Telescript by Robert Kenner and Eric Schlosser, Story by Brian Pearle and Kim Roberts

Zero Days,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

WGA Awards Nominate Arrival, Deadpool (!), Hidden Figures And More

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Leave it to the Merc With a Mouth to muscle his way into Hollywood’s annual awards season, surprising just about everyone in one fell swoop. As the nominations begin to pour in, Tim Miller’s irreverent Deadpool has received nods from the Golden Globes, all the while being shortlisted in both the Best VFX and Makeup and Hairstyling departments ahead of the 89th Academy Awards.

That’s quite the feat for any feature film, let alone an R-rated superhero movie based on one of the lesser-known characters from the Marvel vault. No wonder Ryan Reynolds is so optimistic about the mercenary’s cinematic future.

Now, we can add another nomination to Deadpool’s collection – and it’s a doozy, for Tim Miller’s no-holds-barred actioner has scooped up a nomination for a Writer’s Guild Award, joining Arrival, Fences,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Writers Guild Snubs and Surprises: Fresh Hope for ‘Deadpool’ and ‘Loving,’ But No ‘Silence’

Writers Guild Snubs and Surprises: Fresh Hope for ‘Deadpool’ and ‘Loving,’ But No ‘Silence’
With a cluster of frontrunners and a wide-open field of potential Oscar entrants, the 2017 Writers Guild nominations provide more intelligence about where the Oscars could be heading.

The trio at the head of the pack continue to be “La La Land,” “Manchester by the Sea,” and “Moonlight.” Getting a much-needed late-inning boost are modern western “Hell or High Water” and biracial romance “Loving.” Both are critics’ faves that opened earlier in the year.

However, the WGA and the Academy differ on their categories this year. The WGA says “Moonlight” and “Loving” are original screenplays; for the Oscars, they would compete as adapted. That means that Noah Oppenheim’s “Jackie,” and scripts by writer-director Mike Mills (“20th Century Women”) and two non-signatory films that aren’t WGA-eligible, “The Lobster” and “Toni Erdmann,” might have a shot at landing an Oscar nod.

Conversely, that means some of the WGA’s Adapted Screenplay
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Writers Guild Snubs and Surprises: Fresh Hope for ‘Deadpool’ and ‘Loving,’ But No ‘Silence’

Writers Guild Snubs and Surprises: Fresh Hope for ‘Deadpool’ and ‘Loving,’ But No ‘Silence’
With a cluster of frontrunners and a wide-open field of potential Oscar entrants, the 2017 Writers Guild nominations provide more intelligence about where the Oscars could be heading.

The trio at the head of the pack continue to be “La La Land,” “Manchester by the Sea,” and “Moonlight.” Getting a much-needed late-inning boost are modern western “Hell or High Water” and biracial romance “Loving.” Both are critics’ faves that opened earlier in the year.

However, the WGA and the Academy differ on their categories this year. The WGA says “Moonlight” and “Loving” are original screenplays; for the Oscars, they would compete as adapted. That means that Noah Oppenheim’s “Jackie,” and scripts by writer-director Mike Mills (“20th Century Women”) and two non-signatory films that aren’t WGA-eligible, “The Lobster” and “Toni Erdmann,” might have a shot at landing an Oscar nod.

Conversely, that means some of the WGA’s Adapted Screenplay
See full article at Indiewire »
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