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My Friend Dahmer gets a UK poster and trailer

With just three weeks to go until its UK release, Altitude Film Distribution has unveiled a UK poster and trailer for writer-director Marc Meyers’ upcoming adaptation of Derf Backderf’s critically acclaimed graphic novel My Friend Dahmer which stars Ross Lynch as the notorious serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer alongside Anne Heche, Vincent Kartheiser, Dallas Roberts, and Alex Wolff; check them out here…

Jeff Dahmer is an awkward teenager who collects roadkill. It’s the end of his junior year and he’s practically invisible. His family life (Anne Heche as Joyce Dahmer) is coming undone. He fixates on a neighborhood jogger who routinely passes by his house. By the start of senior year, he acts out, throwing epileptic-like fits in the halls. His goofball antics win over a group of band-nerds who form The Dahmer Fan Club headed by Backderf. This camaraderie can’t mask his growing depravity as approaching
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Exclusive look at the new trailer and poster for My Friend Dahmer

Based on Derf Backderf’s acclaimed 2012 graphic novel of the same name, and a Black Listed script from writer/director Marc Meyers, My Friend Dahmer explores the beginnings of one of the most infamous serial killers in Us history. Today we have an exclusive look at the new trailer and poster for the film.

Former Disney kid Ross Lynch takes the leading role as an awkward teen, an outcast in his small town and preyed upon at high school. As the world around him becomes more immovable in its condemnation of the weird and unusual, a strange bond forms between Dahmer and a group of boys at the school. As time goes on, and his celebrated antics become less palatable to the boys and a growing internal darkness spreads. Slowly the man he is destined to become begins to emerge.

The film looks to take a fresh approach to the serial killer biopic,
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‘The House of Tomorrow’ Is A Charming Coming-Of-Age Tale About A Futurist And A Punk [Review]

Based on Peter Bognanni’s novel, “The House of Tomorrow,” starring Alex Wolff, Asa Butterfield, and Nick Offerman, follows brilliant but sheltered 16-year-old Sebastian (Butterfield) as he attempts to liberate the renegade dwelling within himself under the tutelage of the angst-driven Jared (Wolff). While dissimilar in personality, the two leads are perfectly cast as outliers to society. As their performances infuse unexpected charisma into a rather simple coming-of-age storyline, “The House of Tomorrow” amuses and keeps viewers engaged despite its formulaic presentation.
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Hereditary Director Ari Aster to Helm New Horror Movie for A24

With Hereditary perhaps the most anticipated horror movie of the year following its well-received Sundance premiere (read Heather Wixson's 4.5-star review here), Ari Aster's follow-up film is one that a lot of viewers are already looking forward to, and it's now been reported that his next movie will be a horror project at A24.

Deadline reports that Aster's next movie will be an "untitled horror project" for A24 that is expected to start production at the end of the summer or beginning of the fall. With no shortage of critical acclaim for Hereditary ahead of its June 8th release, A24 is putting a lot of faith into Aster for his second feature film, as the untitled movie is reportedly going to be the largest production to date for the studio, with Lars Knudsen and B Reel on board to produce.

While the official synopsis and title have yet to be revealed,
See full article at DailyDead »

Creepy Merch Tied to 'Hereditary' Horror Film a Hot Sell on Etsy

Creepy Merch Tied to 'Hereditary' Horror Film a Hot Sell on Etsy
Hereditary — the directorial debut of Ari Aster that terrified audiences during its world premiere at Sundance and sprinted toward a currently perfect 100 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes — does not open until June 8, but it’s already doing brisk business … on Etsy.

The e-tailer, which specialized in Diy and vintage finds, is currently hosting a CraftsByCharlieG page named for the daughter character in the film, Charlie Graham. Aster also wrote the script, which centers on a couple (Toni Collette, Gabriel Byrne) and their two kids (Alex Wolff, Milly Shapiro), telling the story of what happens...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black, Karen Gillan, Bobby Cannavale, Nick Jonas, Alex Wolff, Madison Iseman, Ser’Darius Blain, Morgan Turner | Written by Chris McKenna, Erik Sommers, Scott Rosenberg, Jeff Pinkner | Directed by Jake Kasdan

Directed by Jake Kasdan, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle is only a sequel to its 1995 predecessor in the sense that it features a game called Jumanji that sucks people into it, so if you’ve been waiting 22 long years to see a load of poorly-rendered CGI animals running riot through a city then you should brace yourself for disappointment. Instead, this updated version (the board game is now a video game) is more like a fantasy action / comedy vehicle for co-stars Dwayne Johnson and Kevin Hart, with Jack Black and Karen Gillan tagging along for the ride.

The film begins with four high schoolers discovering a dusty old games console while in Saturday detention.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Toni Collette Terrifies in This New Promo Spot For The Disturbing Horror Film Hereditary

We've got a brand new promo trailer for you to watch for the upcoming insanely disturbing horror film Hereditary. Most of the footage highlights a scene in which we Toni Collette's character descends into complete madness. This is has got to be one the most uncomfortable and terrifying family dinners ever.

I saw this film at Sundance and it was jacked up. Hereditary is a truly frightening horror film that may haunt you days after you watch it. I also have to say that Toni Collette gives an amazing performance and she needs to be nominated for Best Actress! I can't wait to see how audiences react to this movie! You can read my review of the film here.

When Ellen, the matriarch of the Graham family, passes away, her daughter’s family begins to unravel cryptic and increasingly terrifying secrets about their ancestry. The more they discover, the
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Asa Butterfield on ‘The House of Tomorrow’ and Learning to Play Bass

From writer/director Peter Livolsi, the indie dramedy The House of Tomorrow follows sheltered 16-year-old Sebastian (Asa Butterfield), who was raised inside a geodesic dome. When a stroke sidelines the grandmother (Ellen Burstyn) that he lives with, Sebastian starts sneaking out to spend time with Jared (Alex Wolff), a chain-smoking punk music obsessed teen with a heart transplant who he met on a guided tour of their home. Soon, the two have a band and a real friendship, and Sebastian must decide if he wants to carry on with the teachings of futurist Buckminster Fuller for his …
See full article at Collider.com »

Asa Butterfield Learned to Play Bass from Alex Wolff for New Movie: ‘He Took Me Under His Wing’

Asa Butterfield Learned to Play Bass from Alex Wolff for New Movie: ‘He Took Me Under His Wing’
Life imitated art for Asa Butterfield and Alex Wolff in their new movie The House of Tomorrow.

The film tells the story of an outcast teen named Sebastian, played by Butterfield, who befriends a young, budding punk rocker named Jared, played Wolff.

Just like their onscreen counterparts, Wolff and Butterfield developed a student-teacher relationship when it came to learning to play their instruments.

“I taught Asa bass, so all the scenes with music, all of that is live. None of that is with overdubs, none of it is us doing overdubs or another musician, we’re doing it live and on the day.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

New Hereditary Promo Promises A Truly Chilling Movie

Every year, there’s always one horror gem that captures audiences’ imaginations and refuses to let go.

From Split to Get Out, The Witch to It Follows, the past several years alone have delivered some truly incredible fright fests – instant classics, if you will – and if there’s one genre film hoping to enter that horror pantheon in 2018 (aside from A Quiet Place), it’s Hereditary.

Coming to us from A24 – a production banner that has fast become a hallmark of quality following the likes of Green Room and It Comes At NightAri Aster’s family thriller has been championed as one of the scariest horror movies in years, and it’s one that sees Toni Collette turn in a tour-de-force (and potentially Oscar-worthy?) performance as the grief-stricken Annie Graham. In fact, it’s the actress’ work in the film that’s the focus of today’s promo, which promises a truly terrifying watch.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Movie Theater Plays Horror Film ‘Hereditary’ Trailer Before ‘Peter Rabbit’

Audience members of a “Peter Rabbit” screening who were expecting a family-friendly viewing experience were in for a surprise on Wednesday.

At Event Cinemas in Innaloo, Western Australia, the trailer for the upcoming R-rated horror film “Hereditary” played ahead of “Peter Rabbit,” a family film following the life of a mischievous rabbit. According to the Sydney Morning Herald, the preview was mistakenly shown in the theater and resulted in a panic from many of the parents and small children in the audience.

“It was dreadful. Very quickly you could tell this was not a kid’s film,” an audience member told the Australian newspaper. “Parents were yelling at the projectionist to stop, covering their kids’ eyes and ears. A few went out to get a staff member but she was overwhelmed and didn’t really know what to do. Some parents fled the cinema with their kids in tow.”

The viewer added,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A24 Plants Oscar Season Seeds for Toni Collette in Horrifying ‘Hereditary’ (Exclusive)

A24 Plants Oscar Season Seeds for Toni Collette in Horrifying ‘Hereditary’ (Exclusive)
Indie distributor A24 rarely leads a marketing push with awards at the fore. After all, movies like Alex Garland’s sci-fi thriller “Ex Machina,” Lenny Abrahamson’s unsettling adaptation “Room” and Barry Jenkins’ micro-budgeted intersectionality drama “Moonlight” don’t exactly scream “Oscar!” from the outset. But the New York-based company nevertheless found an awards-season stride with those films and more.

The plan with “Hereditary,” Ari Aster’s terrifying Sundance entry that has been hailed as a new generation’s “Exorcist,” is to launch the film on June 7 as a summer horror movie, seek out its audience, and if all the pieces fall into place, establish the foundation for a campaign in the fall.With a stack of glowing critical notices already fanning the flames, and on the heels of a year that saw genre embraced by the Motion Picture Academy in interesting ways — from best picture victor “The Shape of Water
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Trailer and poster for horror ‘Hereditary’

Check out the new trailer and poster for writer/director Ari Aster’s critically acclaimed horror Hereditary featuring Toni Collette, Gabriel Byrne, Milly Shapiro and Alex Wolff.

When Ellen, the matriarch of the Graham family, passes away, her daughter Annie (Toni Colette) and her husband (Gabriel Byrne) and their two children begin to unravel cryptic and increasingly terrifying secrets about their ancestry. The more they discover, the more they find themselves trying to outrun the sinister fate they seem to have inherited. Making his feature debut, writer-director Ari Aster unleashes a nightmare vision of a domestic breakdown that exhibits the craft and precision of a nascent auteur, transforming a familial tragedy into something ominous and deeply disquieting, and pushing the horror movie into chilling new terrain with its shattering portrait of heritage gone to hell.

Hereditary is released on June 15th.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Horror Hits Home In This Gallery Of New Stills For Sundance Darling Hereditary

There’s a new A24 horror movie beginning to loom over the horizon, and it’s shaping up to be every bit as unsettling as you might expect.

Its name? Hereditary, Ari Aster’s genre flick, one which also doubles as his feature film debut, that deep dives into the Graham family. Still reeling from the death of their reclusive grandmother, the Grahams begin to unravel cryptic and increasingly terrifying secrets about their ancestry. And let’s just say their family tree is rotten to the core.

At the heart of that story is Toni Collette’s Ellen, the newfound matriarch who begins to suspect that her late mother is causing pain and torment (and sleepless nights!) from beyond the grave, and that it’s all being channeled through her teenage daughter Charlie (Milly Shapiro). Cue the nightmarish visuals and familial drama, but if you’re wanting to take a
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The House of Tomorrow Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The House of Tomorrow Movie Review
The House Of Tomorrow Shout! Studios Reviewed by: Harvey Karten Director: Peter Livolsi Screenwriter: Peter Livolsi adapted from Peter Bognanni’s novel Cast: Ellen Burstyn, Nick Offerman, Asa Butterfield, Alex Wolff, Maude Apatow, Michaela Watkins Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 3/27/18 Opens: April 27, 2018 Coming of age stories often rely on the synergy between two […]

The post The House of Tomorrow Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
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Movie Review – The House of Tomorrow (2018)

The House of Tomorrow, 2018.

Written and Directed by Peter Livolsi.

Starring Ellen Burstyn, Nick Offerman, Asa Butterfield, Alex Wolff, Maude Apatow, Fred Armisen, and Michaela Watkins.

Synopsis:

The film tells futurist, architect, and inventor R. Buckminster Fuller’s incredible story through two teens hoping to get laid, become punk gods, and survive high school.

While clearly not intended to be a biopic, credit should be given to The House of Tomorrow for finding an indirect and roundabout way of paying tribute to the great architectural mind, inventor, and theorist R. Buckminster Fuller. Taking place in the current day, Josephine Prendergast cares for her grandson Sebastian inside of a geodesic dome surrounded by grass and sheltered off from society. His one job is taking visiting families on tours of the dome, preaching Bucky’s message of preserving energy and building a better future, or in more casual terms, the hippie lifestyle.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The House of Tomorrow’ Film Review: Wry, Heartfelt Coming-of-Age Indie Mixes Buckminster Fuller and Punk

  • The Wrap
‘The House of Tomorrow’ Film Review: Wry, Heartfelt Coming-of-Age Indie Mixes Buckminster Fuller and Punk
Geodesic domes, predicated on the concept that they could hold more space with less material, never became the ubiquitous buildings that their creator — future-forward architect and thinker Buckminster Fuller — imagined they would.

But “more with less” is a rewarding concept when it comes to indie movies, and writer-director Peter Livolsi’s “The House of Tomorrow” delivers just that in a brisk 90 minutes, telling a sweet, tart, and intelligently life-affirming story of teenage friendship and outsider spirit with a supremely light touch, and a winning collection of performances.

One of Fuller’s residential domes, tucked away in the Minnesota woods, is where we meet Sebastian Prendergast (Asa Butterfield), a 16-year-old student of the endlessly creative, eccentric inventor’s ideas. His interest no doubt has to do with the fact that he’s been raised his whole life under the careful, home-schooled watch of his guardian Nana Josephine (Ellen Burstyn), once one of Fuller’s architect disciples. Together they live like health-conscious ascetics in a dome that’s also a local tourist attraction, one in which Nana greets guests (in the opening scene, a youth group from a Lutheran church) with a big smile and a “Welcome to the future!”

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Skinny, polite Sebastian has little experience with the outside world. But in the wake of a stroke his Nana suffers during the church group’s visit, he gets to know one of the kids, Jared Whitcomb (Alex Wolff), a sharp-eyed, combative punk fanatic with a heart transplant scar.

Though same-aged Jared is the opposite in nearly every way to Sebastian — rude to his kind-hearted single dad Alan (Nick Offerman) and snarling older sister Meredith (Maude Apatow), dismissive of the meds regimen that tends to his tenuous health, and in general an inveterate rule-breaker — the pair develop a fast bond over their status as misfits tired of restraints.

Also Read: Netflix Acquires Nick Offerman's Animated Movie 'White Fang'

Sebastian, enabled by the dad’s Christian hospitality and drawn to Jared’s thrashing music tastes (and maybe a teensy crush on Meredith), starts sneaking away from home to hang at the Whitcomb house, which spurs Jared to insist the pair form a punk duo (with Sebastian learning on a bass guitar stolen from the church).

Any well-seasoned moviegoer will see the feel-good path of world-opening adolescent rebellion embedded into the DNA of “The House of Tomorrow,” which Livolsi adapted from a 2011 novel by Peter Bognanni. But what makes the movie organically enjoyable outside of its expected direction is that the manifestation of Sebastian’s and Jared’s mutually beneficial attachment is, in Livolsi’s hands, a delicate simmer instead of a sentimental splash, and tended to with plenty of deadpan wit and honest feeling. (Not to mention a delectable punk soundtrack, featuring The Germs, Richard Hell, and Black Flag.)

Sebastian’s social flowering isn’t coaxed by a vision of another family’s domestic purity, after all — Alan is devoted to caring for Jared, which Jared answers by lashing out — but rather by the humane dysfunction of inherently good people making do under one roof. (Or, in the case of a few apartment scenes featuring a wonderfully understated Michaela Watkins as Jared’s struggling mom, roofs separated by a divorce.)

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For Jared, on the other hand, Sebastian offers not just any old escapist companionship, but an opportunity to reformulate his contempt at being handled like a boy in a bubble into a form of vinegary empathy for another cloistered, treatable patient. At the very least, “The House of Tomorrow” boasts a wise emotional intelligence about what draws us out of our imposed worlds and toward the unlikeliest of enrichments.

The movie’s heart-smarts are bolstered by its actors, starting with Butterfield, who creates the subtlest of transformations from beanpole, alien-like awkwardness (his reaction to his first soda is priceless) to confidently unshackled, wannabe punk. Wolff has arguably the tougher role, but earns our sympathy for his teenage prickliness (and prick-ishness) through his soulful eyes and modulated glimpses at Jared’s vulnerable side.

In the Whitcomb abode, they’re both supported by Offerman’s nuanced portrait of all-in parenting, and Apatow’s nicely turned take on annoyed sister as secretly affectionate sparring partner. And though Burstyn’s character is the least believably drawn, the Oscar-winner — who in real life knew Buckminster Fuller (thus requiring no digital wizardry when you see Burstyn in archival footage of him from the ’70s) — puts in her paces with expectedly vivid professionalism.

For a movie whose hiccoughs and payoffs are expected, and whose seams occasionally show, “The House of Tomorrow” is as engagingly designed and executed as one of Fuller’s nifty, thought-provoking inventions. The ironic truth about Fuller’s legacy is that none of his creations ever truly caught on, and yet the sheer vivacity of his belief in solving earth’s problems with ingenuity proved to be its own kind of enduring gift.

A similar irony can be found nestled in the indie charm of “The House of Tomorrow”: that by bringing together the tear-down ethos of punk with the build-up idealism of Fuller, two broken kids can find a workable equilibrium through which to combat the problems of everyday life.



Read original story ‘The House of Tomorrow’ Film Review: Wry, Heartfelt Coming-of-Age Indie Mixes Buckminster Fuller and Punk At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Charlie takes centre stage in new trailer for Hereditary

  • HeyUGuys
Following the announcement of Hereditary’s inclusion at this year’s Sundance Film Festival London, a new trailer has arrived from A24 focusing on Charlie and his chilling abilities.

Written and Directed by Ari Aster, the film stars Toni Collette, Alex Wolff, Milly Shapiro, with Ann Dowd and Gabriel Byrne. The film hits cinemas June 8th. Hereditary Official Synopsis

When Ellen, the matriarch of the Graham family, passes away, her daughter Annie (Toni Colette) and her husband (Gabriel Byrne) and their two children begin to unravel cryptic and increasingly terrifying secrets about their ancestry. The more they discover, the more they find themselves trying to outrun the sinister fate they seem to have inherited.

Making his feature debut, writer-director Ari Aster unleashes a nightmare vision of a domestic breakdown that exhibits the craft and precision of a nascent auteur, transforming a familial tragedy into something ominous and deeply disquieting, and
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Sundance Film Festival London Programme Launched with Women in Film at the forefront

  • HeyUGuys
This morning both the Sundance Institute and Picturehouse announced this year’s programme for Sundance Film Festival: London. Female stories and filmmakers shine brightly in this years line-up as seven out of the twelve films showcased at this year’s Sundance Film Festival: London were directed by women. Along with a thrilling array of female leads on screen, the selection champions female voices and highlights some of the broad and excellent women-led work direct from Sundance Utah.

The Festival, which will take place between the 31st May – 3 June at Picturehouse Central, will open with the UK premiere of Jennifer Fox’s The Tale, starring Laura Dern and Elizabeth Debicki. The festival also honours British talent once again, this time by premiering Idris Elba’s directorial debut, Yardie. Women in Film takes centre stage at this year’s event, as movements such as Time’s Up and #MeToo continue to highlight inequality in the film industry.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘Hereditary’ Trailer Is The Thing of Nightmares

The new trailer for A24’s upcoming horror movie Hereditary is here, and it’s absolutely terrifying. Going into this trailer I knew I had seen enough to be sold. The first trailer haunted the previews of many of the movies I’ve recently seen in theaters. I didn’t want to watch the new trailer because I thought it may spoil my viewing experience. I’m excited for the movie to say the least. I couldn’t help but watch the trailer and I’m happy I did.

Hereditary stars Toni Collette as Annie, a woman who after her mother dies, believes she is still present. Annie is put into the role of matriarch of the family, a position that seems to quite stressful.

The new Hereditary trailer is below, but beware, it can’t be unseen:

Judging the trailer alone, it’s great. Its a tense two minutes.
See full article at Age of the Nerd »
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