News

Baz's creative team cleans up at Aacta Awards

The Great Gatsby dominated. Aacta.s technical and short films awards today, collecting gongs in all six craft categories for which it was nominated, plus the Aacta award for outstanding achievement in visual effects.

The co-production Top of the Lake bagged two TV trophies while Matchbox Pictures. Nowhere Boys, created by Tony Ayres, was named best children.s TV series.

The TV documentary prize went to Redesign My Brain, which explores the revolutionary new science of brain plasticity, written and directed by Paul Scott and produced by Isabel Perez and Scott for ABC TV.

Writer-director Nick Verso's The Last Time I Saw Richard, produced by John Molloy, was honoured as best short fiction film. Developed and funded through Screen Australia.s Springboard program, the short is a prequel to the upcoming feature film Boys In The Trees, tracing the friendship between two teenagers in a mental health clinic in
See full article at IF.com.au »

Film Review: ‘Musicwood’

Film Review: ‘Musicwood’
Musicwood” takes as its title and subject an extraordinary coalition: guitar makers, Native American corporation heads and Greenpeace environmentalists who, for a time at least, sought to find a collective solution to their contradictory interests. At stake: the future of Alaska’s Tongass National Forest, the largest in the U.S. and the last repository of the rare, centuries-old Sitka oaks used for the soundboards of fine acoustic guitars. Part music docu, part travelogue and part ecological advocacy film, Maxine Trump’s feature loses focus as it progresses, though its insights into guitar making, forestry harvesting and environmental shortages resonate strongly.

On the face of it, the coalition’s three arms would seem to have everything in common: Greenpeace wants to protect the rainforest; the guitar makers want to guarantee an uninterrupted supply of Sitka oak (their usage accounting for only a fraction of a percent of the wood harvested
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch Kaki King's Video for "Cargo Cult"

Inventive guitar goddess Kaki King released her latest album, Glow, last week. Recorded in Woodstock, N.Y. with producer D. James Goodwin, the album features the Ethel string quartet and marks King’s return to instrumental guitar work. She recently released a video for one of the album’s standout tracks, “Cargo Cult,” which features King in a hospital gown. Check it out below....
See full article at PasteMagazine »

Melissa Ferrick Rocks On & Is 'Still Right Here'

  • TheImproper.com
Singer Melissa Ferrick has dropped her first studio recording in five years, alerting the music industry she’s back with a vengeance with the feel-good track, Still Right Here. Ferrick’s musical career has spanned some 20 years, belying her positive, high-voltage energy and youthful good looks. In her latest album, released by MPress Records (which also reps the velvet-voiced Seth Glier), the talented singer-songwriter boasts guest spots from the likes of Ani Difranco and Kaki King.
See full article at TheImproper.com »

Imogen Heap And Richard Branson Take Part In Charity Telethon For Pakistan

Join Imogen Heap, Sir Richard Branson and friends online, in a very spontaneous ‘get together’ with live music and open discussion, as they raise funds to benefit the victims of the recent devastating floods in Pakistan.

Hosted by Ze Frank, the online event will feature intimate musical performances by Imogen Heap, Ben Folds, Amanda Palmer, Kate Havnevik, KT Tunstall, Josh Groban, Kaki King, Zoe Keating and Mark Isham.

There will also be revealing conversations with Sir Richard Branson, Mary Robinson, Cameron Sinclair, Mark Pearson (live from Karachi), Gary Slutkin and Anders Wilhemlson. May well be more as the word spreads!

Read more
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Dog Ears Music: Volume 120

Kaki King Brooklyn-based guitarist/singer/songwriter Kaki King conjures up magic. Born in Atlanta, Kaki picked up the guitar at 4 years old but retired it at age 5. By her tweens, she took on the drums and later restored guitar to the mix. After studies at Nyu, King remained in New York, honing her chops to blissful perfection in the subways and on the club circuit. Credits include the Blue Man Group orchestra, late-night performances on Letterman and Jimmy Fallon, and a shared Golden Globe nom for scoring Into the Wild. King has opened for Marianne Faithfull, David Byrne, Keb Mo, and Soulive and performed with Pink Noise, Tegan & Sara, and Foo Fighters. King is a deep and relevant talent. Get started with "Falling Day," from her 2010 Junior, then download the other 11 tracks. Buy: Lala.com Genre: Rock Artist: Kaki King Song: Falling...
See full article at Huffington Post »

TV Daily: Full Episodes of Cougar Town 1.20, Human Target 1.12, Ugly Betty 4.20 and More!

If you recently missed an episode of your favorite show, don't sweat it. TV Daily has you covered. Every day, we will be updating you with the funniest, most exciting series out there. Finally, you can catch all of these water cooler conversation starters in one convenient place. Today, we have brand new episodes of Cougar Town, Stossel, Ugly Betty, Human Target, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, The Chef's Kitchen, and Camp Woodward.

To get started, click on one of the boxes below:

Cougar Town: Episode 1.20: "Wake Up Time"

Travis' first breakup forces Jules to come to a realization about herself.

Stossel: Episode 1.13: "Thu, Mar 25, 2010"

John Stossel looks at the unfunded liabilities behind Social Security and Medicare, and asks "Are we stealing from our children?"

Ugly Betty: Episode 4.20: "Hello Goodbye"

Betty has a hard time telling Daniel important news about her future.

Human Target:
See full article at MovieWeb »

Pajiba After Dark 4/14/10

  • Pajiba
I'm not at my best right now because I really really want to take a nap. Walking at least two miles a day between my house and campus sucks way more than biking the same amount. If I happen to get my hands on whoever stole my bike, they're getting a kick in the nuts and/or ovaries (hey, this is Miami) with my left foot because my right ankle is currently attempting to throw in the towel and could not be counted on to carry out such an important task without causing me undue pain. Also I'm way more aware of the creepy drivers who slow down to look at me now that I'm not trying to keep myself from running into telephone poles. And look, I'm sure there may be one couple out there whose story starts with "Well, I was walking down the street one day and
See full article at Pajiba »

Music: Review: MusicalWork Review:Kaki King: Junior

It isn’t as extreme as when, say, Michael Jordan embarrassed himself on the baseball field, but there is a noticeable discrepancy between Kaki King’s instrumental prowess and her abilities on the microphone. This became apparent when the guitar virtuoso made her vocals more prominent on 2008’s Dreaming Of Revenge, and now it’s inescapable on her fifth album, which finds King’s voice on nine of 11 tracks. That said, it’s difficult to argue with the places King took her music on her last three discs, which feature lots of beautiful tunes that are moody, atmospheric ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Green Day, Them Crooked Vultures Invade This Week's 'Late Night Lineup'

The biggest news in late night comedy this week has nothing to do with anything being broadcast on the airwaves. Conan O'Brien, the former host of "The Tonight Show" who walked away from his post at the beginning of the year in a storm of controversy and Jay Leno, kicks off his tour on Monday night (April 12). He'll begin in Eugene, Oregon and cover over a dozen cities across the country. It will be interesting to see what he rolls out and how it plays into his potential return to television later this year.

But there are things happening on television too. Last week was a remarkably great few days for live music on talk shows, and this week is no different. "The Late Show with David Letterman" is on hiatus this week (perhaps they're all taking the next few days off to celebrate the host's birthday, which is today
See full article at MTV Newsroom »

Morning Brew: Tuesday, Dec. 1

Wow, December already? Good morning!

Courtenay Semel is really into celebrating the fact that she's a cover girl, throwing herself a party and everything. Curve is probably seeing its most sales ever, with the heiress herself likely having purchased several to give away to friends, family and prospective girlfriends.

If you're a Hollyoaks fan, you might be sad to hear that Zoë Lister will be gone as of January. The second lesbianish character to leave the show this season, Zoë claims she was "proud" of how her character's ex-flame Sarah died earlier this year, which was falling to her death with a sabotaged parachute. They're going to have to pull out all the stops in offing Zoë. Here's an idea: Lesbian bed death.

The New Yorker's awesome lesbian writer Ariel Levy has penned a piece on "Sports, sex, and the case of Caster Semenya." It's a great read, and further
See full article at AfterEllen.com »

Into the Wild

Into the Wild
This review was written for the festival screening of "Into the Wild".Telluride Film Festival

SAN FRANCISCO -- The romance of the open road has proved irresistible to adventurous young men from Jack London to Jack Kerouac and, more recently, Christopher McCandless, a troubled college grad who in the early 1990s burned his cash, junked his car and disappeared into the north Alaskan territories, where he died an agonizing death from starvation, alone.

Writer-director Sean Penn's "Into the Wild", based on Jon Krakauer's book, is an extravagantly ambitious, unfocused film that chronicles this tragic episode with flights of brilliance, self-indulgence and thrilling nature cinematography.

"Wild" has appeal for young audiences and baby boomers alike. Although Penn has an uneven track record as a director, his reputation as an actor, coupled with exciting outdoor adventure sequences, should spell respectable boxoffice. Paramount Vantage releases the film domestically Sept. 21.

McCandless (Emile Hirsch), a bright loner, flees a fractious home headed by a distant, raging father (an underused William Hurt) and an alcoholic mother Marcia Gay Harden). After graduating from Emory, he takes off on his cross-country odyssey without telling anyone. When he reaches Alaska, he camps in an abandoned bus that will become his tomb, hunts animals for food and memorializes his experiences in a journal, a course of events vividly realized in the film.

Penn flashes back and forth in time with alacrity, aided by seamless transitions from editor Jay Cassidy, his frequent collaborator. Eric Gautier's astounding cinematography is visceral whether he is shooting the adrenaline rush of running the rapids, the serenity of limitless Western vistas or the punishing stillness of the wilderness.

Skillfully constructed, the film is hampered by a reliance on McCandless' pretentious, facile ruminations. Although he occasionally shows him in an unflattering light, Penn doesn't question whether McCandless' anti-materialist, "absolute truth/freedom through nature" creed is a cover story for running away from responsibility and himself, nor does he probe into why he pursues the extreme isolation that costs him his life.

While the material seems to warrant understated, direct storytelling, along the lines of Werner Herzog's "Grizzly Man", Penn opts for epic proportions and clutters his narrative with gimmicks. For the most part, it works. What's missing is the perspective and insight that would illuminated the inner dimensions of a driven young man who is preachy and downright irritating. It's unclear if it's a function of the screenplay, the callowness of the character or a flat lead performance, but McCandless remains opaque, so the movie is saddled with a cipher at its center.

Hirsch doesn't project the magnetism that would give credence to McCandless' supposed liberating effect on the people he encounters. As he heals the marital strife of a hippie couple (Catherine Keener, Brian Dierker), expands the horizons of a lonely widower (Hal Holbrook) and steals the heart of a shy singer (Kristen Stewart), one wonders if he's a legend in his own mind. Vince Vaughn, playing a rowdy combine worker, gives the film a welcome jolt of humor that helps relieve the earnestness.

McCandless wouldn't be the first young man to mythologize himself or imagine he's the star of his own movie, which, ironically, he has become. It's difficult to stifle the impulse to chide, "Oh, grow up", but he never had that chance.

INTO THE WILD

Paramount Vantage

Paramount Vantage and River Road Entertainment present a Square One C.I.H./Linson Film production

Screenwriter-director: Sean Penn

Producers: Sean Penn, Art Linson, Bob Pohlad

Executive producers: John J. Kelly, Frank Hildebrand, David Blocker

Director of photography: Eric Gautier

Production designer: Derek R. Hill

Music: Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder

Costume designer: Mary Claire Hannan

Editor: Jay Cassidy

Cast:

Christopher: Emile Hirsch

Billie: Marcia Gay Harden

Walt: William Hurt

Ron: Hal Holbrook

Jan: Catherine Keener

Carine: Jena Malone

Tracy: Kristen Stewart

Wayne: Vince Vaughn

Rainey: Brian Dierker

Running time -- 147 minutes

MPAA rating: R

Into the Wild

Into the Wild
Telluride Film Festival

SAN FRANCISCO -- The romance of the open road has proved irresistible to adventurous young men from Jack London to Jack Kerouac and, more recently, Christopher McCandless, a troubled college grad who in the early 1990s burned his cash, junked his car and disappeared into the north Alaskan territories, where he died an agonizing death from starvation, alone.

Writer-director Sean Penn's "Into the Wild", based on Jon Krakauer's book, is an extravagantly ambitious, unfocused film that chronicles this tragic episode with flights of brilliance, self-indulgence and thrilling nature cinematography.

"Wild" has appeal for young audiences and baby boomers alike. Although Penn has an uneven track record as a director, his reputation as an actor, coupled with exciting outdoor adventure sequences, should spell respectable boxoffice. Paramount Vantage releases the film domestically Sept. 21.

McCandless (Emile Hirsch), a bright loner, flees a fractious home headed by a distant, raging father (an underused William Hurt) and an alcoholic mother Marcia Gay Harden). After graduating from Emory, he takes off on his cross-country odyssey without telling anyone. When he reaches Alaska, he camps in an abandoned bus that will become his tomb, hunts animals for food and memorializes his experiences in a journal, a course of events vividly realized in the film.

Penn flashes back and forth in time with alacrity, aided by seamless transitions from editor Jay Cassidy, his frequent collaborator. Eric Gautier's astounding cinematography is visceral whether he is shooting the adrenaline rush of running the rapids, the serenity of limitless Western vistas or the punishing stillness of the wilderness.

Skillfully constructed, the film is hampered by a reliance on McCandless' pretentious, facile ruminations. Although he occasionally shows him in an unflattering light, Penn doesn't question whether McCandless' anti-materialist, "absolute truth/freedom through nature" creed is a cover story for running away from responsibility and himself, nor does he probe into why he pursues the extreme isolation that costs him his life.

While the material seems to warrant understated, direct storytelling, along the lines of Werner Herzog's "Grizzly Man", Penn opts for epic proportions and clutters his narrative with gimmicks. For the most part, it works. What's missing is the perspective and insight that would illuminated the inner dimensions of a driven young man who is preachy and downright irritating. It's unclear if it's a function of the screenplay, the callowness of the character or a flat lead performance, but McCandless remains opaque, so the movie is saddled with a cipher at its center.

Hirsch doesn't project the magnetism that would give credence to McCandless' supposed liberating effect on the people he encounters. As he heals the marital strife of a hippie couple (Catherine Keener, Brian Dierker), expands the horizons of a lonely widower (Hal Holbrook) and steals the heart of a shy singer (Kristen Stewart), one wonders if he's a legend in his own mind. Vince Vaughn, playing a rowdy combine worker, gives the film a welcome jolt of humor that helps relieve the earnestness.

McCandless wouldn't be the first young man to mythologize himself or imagine he's the star of his own movie, which, ironically, he has become. It's difficult to stifle the impulse to chide, "Oh, grow up", but he never had that chance.

INTO THE WILD

Paramount Vantage

Paramount Vantage and River Road Entertainment present a Square One C.I.H./Linson Film production

Screenwriter-director: Sean Penn

Producers: Sean Penn, Art Linson, Bob Pohlad

Executive producers: John J. Kelly, Frank Hildebrand, David Blocker

Director of photography: Eric Gautier

Production designer: Derek R. Hill

Music: Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder

Costume designer: Mary Claire Hannan

Editor: Jay Cassidy

Cast:

Christopher: Emile Hirsch

Billie: Marcia Gay Harden

Walt: William Hurt

Ron: Hal Holbrook

Jan: Catherine Keener

Carine: Jena Malone

Tracy: Kristen Stewart

Wayne: Vince Vaughn

Rainey: Brian Dierker

Running time -- 147 minutes

MPAA rating: R

Into the Wild

Into the Wild
Telluride Film Festival

SAN FRANCISCO -- The romance of the open road has proved irresistible to adventurous young men from Jack London to Jack Kerouac and, more recently, Christopher McCandless, a troubled college grad who in the early 1990s burned his cash, junked his car and disappeared into the north Alaskan territories, where he died an agonizing death from starvation, alone.

Writer-director Sean Penn's "Into the Wild", based on Jon Krakauer's book, is an extravagantly ambitious, unfocused film that chronicles this tragic episode with flights of brilliance, self-indulgence and thrilling nature cinematography.

"Wild" has appeal for young audiences and baby boomers alike. Although Penn has an uneven track record as a director, his reputation as an actor, coupled with exciting outdoor adventure sequences, should spell respectable boxoffice. Paramount Vantage releases the film domestically Sept. 21.

McCandless (Emile Hirsch), a bright loner, flees a fractious home headed by a distant, raging father (an underused William Hurt) and an alcoholic mother Marcia Gay Harden). After graduating from Emory, he takes off on his cross-country odyssey without telling anyone. When he reaches Alaska, he camps in an abandoned bus that will become his tomb, hunts animals for food and memorializes his experiences in a journal, a course of events vividly realized in the film.

Penn flashes back and forth in time with alacrity, aided by seamless transitions from editor Jay Cassidy, his frequent collaborator. Eric Gautier's astounding cinematography is visceral whether he is shooting the adrenaline rush of running the rapids, the serenity of limitless Western vistas or the punishing stillness of the wilderness.

Skillfully constructed, the film is hampered by a reliance on McCandless' pretentious, facile ruminations. Although he occasionally shows him in an unflattering light, Penn doesn't question whether McCandless' anti-materialist, "absolute truth/freedom through nature" creed is a cover story for running away from responsibility and himself, nor does he probe into why he pursues the extreme isolation that costs him his life.

While the material seems to warrant understated, direct storytelling, along the lines of Werner Herzog's "Grizzly Man", Penn opts for epic proportions and clutters his narrative with gimmicks. For the most part, it works. What's missing is the perspective and insight that would illuminated the inner dimensions of a driven young man who is preachy and downright irritating. It's unclear if it's a function of the screenplay, the callowness of the character or a flat lead performance, but McCandless remains opaque, so the movie is saddled with a cipher at its center.

Hirsch doesn't project the magnetism that would give credence to McCandless' supposed liberating effect on the people he encounters. As he heals the marital strife of a hippie couple (Catherine Keener, Brian Dierker), expands the horizons of a lonely widower (Hal Holbrook) and steals the heart of a shy singer (Kristen Stewart), one wonders if he's a legend in his own mind. Vince Vaughn, playing a rowdy combine worker, gives the film a welcome jolt of humor that helps relieve the earnestness.

McCandless wouldn't be the first young man to mythologize himself or imagine he's the star of his own movie, which, ironically, he has become. It's difficult to stifle the impulse to chide, "Oh, grow up", but he never had that chance.

INTO THE WILD

Paramount Vantage

Paramount Vantage and River Road Entertainment present a Square One C.I.H./Linson Film production

Screenwriter-director: Sean Penn

Producers: Sean Penn, Art Linson, Bob Pohlad

Executive producers: John J. Kelly, Frank Hildebrand, David Blocker

Director of photography: Eric Gautier

Production designer: Derek R. Hill

Music: Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder

Costume designer: Mary Claire Hannan

Editor: Jay Cassidy

Cast:

Christopher: Emile Hirsch

Billie: Marcia Gay Harden

Walt: William Hurt

Ron: Hal Holbrook

Jan: Catherine Keener

Carine: Jena Malone

Tracy: Kristen Stewart

Wayne: Vince Vaughn

Rainey: Brian Dierker

MPAA rating R, running time 147 minutes.

See also

Credited With | External Sites