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'The Fourth Estate': Inside Showtime's Docu-Series on New York Times vs. Trump

A veil is lifted in the final episode of The Fourth Estate, Liz Garbus' new Showtime docu-series about the New York Times' coverage of the Donald Trump presidency. (It premieres on May 27th.) The Washington bureau's conservative politics correspondent, Jeremy Peters, is reporting on Roy Moore's failed bid for the U.S. Senate in Alabama. He links up with Steve Bannon, the former White House chief strategist and the Southern politician's most vocal national surrogate. It's clear the pair – a leader of the alt-right and a gay beat reporter with a book deal,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘The Fourth Estate’

Tribeca Film Review: ‘The Fourth Estate’
The opening or closing night of a film festival can make a statement — about where that festival, or the larger world of film, is headed. Tonight, the Tribeca Film Festival made a striking statement by presenting Liz Garbus’ “The Fourth Estate” as its closing-night selection. Garbus is a renowned documentary filmmaker whose artistry has only grown with the years, culminating in the luminous, heartbreaking, Oscar-nominated musical psychodramatic portrait “What Happened, Miss Simone?” (2015). But “The Fourth Estate” isn’t, technically speaking, a feature film. It’s the first episode of a four-part documentary series, produced by Showtime (it premieres there on May 27), that takes a close-up look at the inside hustle and bustle of The New York Times as it covers the Trump presidency.

The distinction between a film or TV documentary may, at this point, seem academic. There’s a mountain of nonfiction now produced for the small screen. Almost every year at Sundance,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tribeca 2018 Women Directors: Meet Liz Garbus — “The Fourth Estate”

Garbus filming “The Fourth Estate”: Tj Kirkpatrick/Showtime

Liz Garbus is an Emmy and Peabody award-winning filmmaker whose film “What Happened, Miss Simone?” opened the 2015 Sundance Film Festival, received a Peabody Award, and was nominated for an Oscar. Her other films include “The Farm: Angola, USA,” “Girlhood,” and “Bobby Fischer Against the World.”

The Fourth Estate” will premiere at the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival on April 28.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

LG: “The Fourth Estate” is a vérité film taking you inside The New York Times for the first year of the Trump presidency, pulling back the curtain on how the most important newspaper in the world would fight for the people’s right to know the truth in the era of “fake news” and “alternative facts.” ​

W&H: What drew you to this story?

​​LG: After Donald Trump’s win, I knew
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Obit’ Editor Kristin Bye Wins Karen Schmeer Fellowship

Kristin Bye, editor of the documentary “Obit,” has won the Karen Schmeer Film Editing Fellowship.

The award, announced Wednesday, was created in memory of Karen Schmeer, the film editor of “The Fog of War,” “Fast, Cheap and Out of Control,” and “Bobby Fischer Against the World,” who was killed in a hit-and-run accident in 2010. Bye will receive the fellowship on March 13 at the SXSW Film Festival Awards Ceremony in Austin, Texas.

The yearlong fellowship is designed to foster development of an emerging documentary film editor by offering opportunities for creative growth and professional community building and includes mentorship, passes to film festivals and screening series, a $1000 cash award, and a collection of Schmeer’s films. Bye’s mentors will be Sabine Krayenbühl (“The Price of Everything,” “Letters from Baghdad”), Michael Levine (“Restrepo,” “The Cruise”), and Enat Sidi (“Jesus Camp,” “The Wolfpack”). It’s the only documentary editing fellowship in the United States.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Liz Garbus’ New York Times Doc Gets Release Date on Showtime

Garbus: The Hollywood Reporter/YouTube

Awards for fake news stories and the fact that terms like “post-truth” exist suggest that we need a David and Goliath narrative about the importance of journalism now more than ever. Thankfully, as Deadline reports, Liz Garbus’ documentary on The New York Times will air on Showtime on May 27. The previously-announced doc chronicles the publication’s inner workings during the first year of the Trump Administration, which isn’t exactly a proponent of the free press (to put it mildly). Produced by RadicalMedia for Showtime, Garbus’ project is tentatively titled “The Fourth Estate.”

“From the first time President Trump called The New York Times ‘highly inaccurate’ in its coverage of his administration, through his false claim that the paper is ‘failing’ and losing thousands of subscribers, to ultimately declaring the majority of the nation’s major news outlets ‘fake news,’ a chief task for the Times,
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Tobey Maguire Chess Movie Launches Day-and-Date On Amazon in the U.K.

Tobey Maguire Chess Movie Launches Day-and-Date On Amazon in the U.K.
Pawn Sacrifice” will launch on Amazon’s U.K. Prime Video on August 13, the first time the streaming service has had a movie day and date with its theatrical release in the country.

The film stars Tobey Maguire as American chess prodigy Bobby Fischer and launched at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2014, before getting a limited U.S. release in 2015.

Set at the height of the Cold War, the film tells the story of Fischer and the epic matches he had at the 1972 World Chess Championships, effectively a match-up between the superpowers of the U.S. and Soviet Russia.

Amazon Prime subscribers in the U.K. will be able to stream or download the movie from this weekend, as the film is released in theaters. Bleecker Street took the U.S. rights to the movie, and in the U.K. it is with eOne.

Directed by Edward Zwick (“The Last Samurai”) and written by Steven Knight (“Peaky Blinders
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch The UK Trailer For ‘Pawn Sacrifice’ With Tobey Maguire

Entertainment One have released the very first trailer for Pawn Sacrifice, the new chess-based drama starring Tobey Maguire which arrives in UK cinemas and on Amazon Prime Video from August 13th.

Pawn Sacrifice follows American chess phenomenon Bobby Fischer (Tobey Maguire), who squares off against his Russian rival Boris Spassky (Liev Schreiber) in the 1972 “Match of the Century” in Reykjavik, in this gripping drama from director Edward Zwick (Glory) and screenwriter Steven Knight (Eastern Promises).

Watch the trailer below.

The post Watch The UK Trailer For ‘Pawn Sacrifice’ With Tobey Maguire appeared first on The Hollywood News.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

James Newton Howard On Why ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Was So Hard to Score And Why He’s Going On Tour

James Newton Howard On Why ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Was So Hard to Score And Why He’s Going On Tour
In the age of nonstop studio blockbusters, a composer is never out of work. And no composer works harder than James Newton Howard. The brains behind more than 150 scores for film and TV, Howard has been nominated for eight Oscars across a career spanning more than four decades. His work includes the “Hunger Games” series; “Pretty Woman”; and every M. Night Shyamalan movie.

And music from all those films was on display at the 52nd Karlovy Vary International Film Festival in the Czech Republic, where Howard was honored during the June 30 opening ceremony with the Crystal Globe for Outstanding Artistic Contribution to World Cinema.

“I’m very lucky,” Howard told IndieWire at the festival the next day. “I do seem to be in demand.”

Read More: How Hollywood’s Latest Tech Tool Enhanced Oscar-Winning ‘The Jungle Book’ and ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’ (Video)

Fittingly, after receiving his award,
See full article at Indiewire »

Florida Georgia Line, Mickey Guyton, Brett Eldredge and More Turn Out for New Country Music Hall of Fame Exhibit

Florida Georgia Line, Mickey Guyton, Brett Eldredge and More Turn Out for New Country Music Hall of Fame Exhibit
Can we get a hallelujah?

Not just for Maren Morris’ Grammy-winning single “My Church,” but for every other stellar achievement of the past year that has kept country fans coming back for more.

All the standout tunes, trends and triumphs of last year are showcased in a new Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum exhibit titled American Currents (The Music of 2016) — which opened Friday — and many of its subjects turned up at a preview event on Tuesday to see for themselves what they have accomplished.

What they saw in the hallowed Nashville museum is an amalgam that proves the diversity,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

On this day: Internet Boyfriends, Fishy Rom-Coms, and Toxic Masculinity Camp

On this day in history as it relates to showbiz...

1930 Taina Elg is born in Finland. Briefly becomes a star in Hollywood with Les Girls (1957) winning a Golden Globe

1940 Much missed Puerto Rican actor Raul Julia was born on this day. "Oh Gomez..." ♥︎

1943 Chess genius Bobby Fischer is born. He was recently biopic'ed via Tobey Maguire in Pawn Sacrifice.

1963 Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallée is born in Montreal. He's really been cranking out the hits lately: Dallas Buyers Club, Wild, and the juicy actress-bliss of Big Little Lies

1964 Oscar winner Juliette Binoche, one of the greatest actresses in the world, is born in Paris...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Magnus review – chess doc about grandmaster makes all the wrong moves

This documentary about world champion Magnus Carlsen has nothing interesting to say about the state of chess today

Norwegian grandmaster Magnus Carlsen, 25, is the current chess world champion, but if there were a tournament for the best chess movie of all time, this one would get knocked out well before the quarter finals. Why a documentary about Carlsen is hitting our screens at all rather than one about, say, his rival Viswanathan Anand, may have something to do with Magnus’ stolid Scandinavian good looks, chiselled if somewhat bovine features that have made him a bit of a celebrity beyond the chess world. But even though director Benjamin Ree has accessed the family archive of footage showing young Magnus as a socially awkward prodigy through the years and interviewed him directly many times, the film barely dents his inviolate wall of polite reticence. Worse still, there’s scant input from chess
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Magnus’

Film Review: ‘Magnus’
How brain-boggling a chess virtuoso is Magnus Carlsen, the 25-year-old Norwegian prodigy and reigning World Chess Champion? In the light and lively portrait-of-a-genius documentary “Magnus,” Carlsen appears at Harvard University in 2013 to face off against 10 of the world’s greatest players in simultaneous games — and he does it blindfolded. That’s right: He plays all 10 games in his head at once. (Naturally, he wins all 10.) It’s been a long time since Bobby Fischer’s brainiac demon antics ruled the chess world, but his legend casts quite a shadow. When you first see Magnus Carlsen, who is the chess world’s most electrifying rock star since Fischer, there’s a natural tendency to wonder if this young man who lives inside the labyrinth of chess might also, like Fischer, be a spooky captive of his own mind.

But Magnus, it turns out, is the anti-Bobby: a fascinatingly “normalized” prodigy. He can,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Luke Cage’: ‘Back to the Future,’ Stan Lee and More Easter Eggs You May Have Missed

‘Luke Cage’: ‘Back to the Future,’ Stan Lee and More Easter Eggs You May Have Missed
There’s more than meets the eye to Netflix’s timely and thought-provoking Marvel series “Luke Cage,” which recently debuted to much fanfare, critical acclaim and maybe even temporary service outage.

Whether you’re one of the dedicated who have already binged all 13 episodes or are slowly savoring each installment, there’s plenty happening on the screen beyond the main action. Some of it may be obvious, such as when a street hawker in the first episode (selling DVDs of The Incident in “The Avengers”) refers to Tony Stark, “the blonde dude with the hammer, the old dude with the shield, the green monster and I don’t mean Fenway.”

Read More: ‘Luke Cage’ Reimagines Harlem as a Hip-Hop Westeros

Many of the references may not be so blatant though or of the blink-and-you’ll-miss-it variety. Here’s a breakdown of just some of the fun references made that we caught on the first pass.
See full article at Indiewire »

Queen of Katwe review: Ugandan chess movie could be new Slumdog

David Oyelowo and Lupita Nyong’o deliver nuanced performances in a movie which threatens to back itself into a corner but has enough zest and intelligence to carry through

Making a chess movie is a tricky move. Your first stumbling block is that, of all sports, this must be one of the most uncinematic – as well as the most baffling for the novice. Even those familiar with the queen’s gambit need a little while to take a look at a board in an apparently tense setup and assess its import for both players.

Plus, on the big screen at least, the dramatis personae are rarely appealing. Traditionally, movie chess is the recourse of the brilliant but socially awkward male, who uses it to communicate when more common methods prove elusive. Such folk can be a struggle to root for, their victories and defeats wrapped up in psychological trauma and solitary childhoods.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

[Review] Pawn Sacrifice

I’ve always been fascinated by Bobby Fischer due to his vanishing rather than anything he accomplished at a chessboard. I’ve never been good at the game, yet I respect its complexity. The greats literally memorize past matches and maneuvers, so in-tune with the playing field that they can play out loud with nothing more than words. Fischer was a great—the youngest Grandmaster in history and the first American-born World Champion. Like most geniuses, however, the strain of intellect, pressure, and success brought with it a hefty price. For Bobby it was the deterioration of his mental health. And as it’s told in Edward Zwick‘s Pawn Sacrifice, he may have known this from the beginning. If he were to rise to the top, the time was now.

My knowledge of the man was always miniscule: a footnote to a 1980s film I watched religiously called Searching for Bobby Fischer.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Pawn Sacrifice – The Review

The kid faces the champion, loses, fights his way back, and takes the rematch. It’s a familiar sports trope and Pawn Sacrifice, the biography of volatile chess champ Bobby Fischer, is as formulaic in its own way as Rocky (or if you prefer, Searching For Bobby Fischer). The good news is that it’s an intense and fascinating drama capable of involving those who know little about chess as well as avid players.

Raised by his single Jewish mother, Brooklyn native Fischer was born in 1943 and was proficient on the chess board by the age of six. A self-taught player, he continued mastering his game though his early teens, when he defeated star players. As an adult (played by Tobey Maguire) Fischer’s success at the game grows, but his mental state begins to unravel and he suspects the government is watching his every move. Two men enter Bobby
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

James Newton Howard’s Pawn Sacrifice Score To Be Released On Sept. 11

Coming to theaters in two weeks is director Ed Zwick’s riveting Pawn Sacrifice.

It’s the story of Bobby Fischer, America’s foremost chess player, who faced the reigning champion, Boris Spassky of Russia, in a series of matches that held the world spellbound.

For fans of 1972’s “Match of the Century,” the film is everything you’re hoping for. Zwick’s movie is flawless right down to the re-enactment of the 1971 interview with Dick Cavett.

Bobby Fischer first makes waves in the elite world of chess as a 6-year-old whiz-kid from Brooklyn famous for his laser-like concentration and ability to dominate all challengers. By his teens, the boy wonder has gone from chess savant to international grandmaster, but his meteoric rise is punctuated by unpredictable personal behavior and escalating demands that raise hackles in the conservative chess establishment.

As he travels the globe with manager Paul Marshall (Michael Stuhlbarg
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Watch: Tobey Maguire & Liev Schreiber Face Off In The First Trailer For Ed Zwick’s Chess Thriller ‘Pawn Sacrifice’

Name all the chess films you can off the top of your head, go: There’s Boaz Yakim’s “Fresh,” “Brooklyn Castle,” Andrew Bujalski’s “Computer Chess” and easily the best of them all, “Searching For Bobby Fischer.” But few and far between are classic, and almost all pieces of chess narrative always circle back to Bobby Fischer, the American prodigy who captured the imagination of the world when he faced off against some of the greatest chess minds the Soviet Union has ever produced. Read More: Review: Kids Are King In Winning Chess Doc 'Brooklyn Castle' There have been documentaries on this subject, even past movies, but no one’s really made the definitive film about Fischer, his troubled mind and his famous matches in the Soviet Union. But Filmmaker Ed Zwick (“Glory,” “The Last Samurai”) has given it a shot, with Tobey Maguire in the lead
See full article at The Playlist »

Daily | Sundance + Berlin 2015 | Liz Garbus’s What Happened, Miss Simone?

Liz Garbus’s What Happened, Miss Simone? "features extensive live footage of Nina Simone, the politically engaged jazz/blues/pop singer who played a major role in the Civil Rights movement, and then disappeared from public life for a while under mysterious circumstances," writes Noel Murray at the Dissolve. Variety's Scott Foundas: "Garbus, who previously investigated the intersection of madness, genius and celebrity in documentaries about Marilyn Monroe (Love, Marilyn) and the chess master Bobby Fischer (Bobby Fischer Against the World), has perhaps her richest subject yet in Simone." We're collecting more reviews and video. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Sundance + Berlin 2015 | Liz Garbus’s What Happened, Miss Simone?

Liz Garbus’s What Happened, Miss Simone? "features extensive live footage of Nina Simone, the politically engaged jazz/blues/pop singer who played a major role in the Civil Rights movement, and then disappeared from public life for a while under mysterious circumstances," writes Noel Murray at the Dissolve. Variety's Scott Foundas: "Garbus, who previously investigated the intersection of madness, genius and celebrity in documentaries about Marilyn Monroe (Love, Marilyn) and the chess master Bobby Fischer (Bobby Fischer Against the World), has perhaps her richest subject yet in Simone." We're collecting more reviews and video. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »
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