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‘The Handmaid’s Tale’: The Most Political Episode Yet Shocks By What Feels Real, and What Feels Like Fiction

[Editor’s Note: This review contains spoilers for “The Handmaid’s Tale” Season 2, Episode 9, “Smart Power.”]

This week, a key representative of a regime accused of serious human rights violations traveled to a foreign land to attempt negotiations with a rival power.

Also, there was a new episode of “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

Yes, this is a blunt comparison of two events: The premiere of “Smart Power,” the ninth episode of Hulu’s Emmy-winning drama, in which Commander Waterford of Gilead and his wife travel to Canada for a meeting with that neighboring government, and this week’s Singapore-set summit between Donald Trump and North Korean’s Kim Jong-un.

But to be clear, this isn’t meant to be a comparison between Trump’s America and Waterford’s Gilead. Instead, we’re looking at North Korea as a way of understanding “Smart Power,” specifically in the way that it depicts how Canadian citizens, and Canada itself, react to the presence of the Gileadean forces.

This is because genre-wise,
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Hulu’s Emmy-Winning Drama ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Forges Bold New Course in Darker Season 2

Hulu’s Emmy-Winning Drama ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Forges Bold New Course in Darker Season 2
Costume designer Ana Crabtree did not need to be on hand for an outdoor location shoot for “The Handmaid’s Tale” in Toronto on a frigid night in early March. But there she was, shivering outside the Toronto Hilton with the rest of the crew and key cast members as director Jeremy Podeswa lensed an emotional confrontation scene. “I wanted to check the lines on Serena’s overcoat,” Crabtree explains.

Crabtree’s attentiveness to the outerwear she crafted for the character, played by Yvonne Strahovski in the series, is indicative of the dedication found throughout the “Handmaid’s” company. Bruce Miller,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Boss on Bringing #MeToo to Gilead

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Boss on Bringing #MeToo to Gilead
Spoiler Alert: Do not read if you have not yet watched “Smart Power,” the ninth episode of the second season of “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

As the second season of “The Handmaid’s Tale” marches toward its season finale, it is offering new hope in the story by proving that not every society has fallen as far as America.

In a pivotal ninth episode moment, a Canadian official kicks Gilead Commander Fred Waterford (Joseph Fiennes) out of the country, where he has been visiting with wife, Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski) on a diplomatic mission — because the handmaids’ letters finally came to light,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Handmaid’S Tale: Season 2, Episode 8 TV Show Trailer [Hulu]

The Handmaid’s Tale Season 2 Episode 8 Trailer

Hulu‘s The Handmaid’s Tale: Season 2, Episode 8 TV show trailer stars Elisabeth Moss, Madeline Brewer, Yvonne Strahovski, Joseph Fiennes, and Max Minghella.

Janine (Madeline Brewer)’s baby becomes ill and Commander Fred Waterford (Joseph Fiennes) seeks retribution for the orders given in [...]

Continue reading: The Handmaid’S Tale: Season 2, Episode 8 TV Show Trailer [Hulu]

The post The Handmaid’S Tale: Season 2, Episode 8 TV Show Trailer [Hulu] appeared first on FilmBook.
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Idris Elba Set to Direct & Star in Modern The Hunchback Of Notre Dame Movie for Netflix

Victor Hugo's The Hunchback of Notre-Dame has had many adaptations over the years on the stage, big screen, and TV, and now Netflix will bring their own version of the timeless tale to the streaming world with a modern-day The Hunchback of Notre Dame music-infused movie that is set to star and be directed and produced by Idris Elba:

Press Release: Idris Elba Set to Star, Direct and Produce A Modern Retelling of “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” for Netflix

Golden Globe and SAG winner Idris Elba will star, direct and produce the currently untitled film, a modern retelling of Victor Hugo’s “Hunchback of Notre Dame” for Netflix. The feature film will be a sonic and musical experience for which Elba will also produce the music.

Producers: Fred Berger (La La Land) and Brian Kavanaugh-Jones (Midnight Special) for Automatik and Elba and Ana Garanito for Elba’s Green Door shingle.
See full article at DailyDead »

'Handmaid's Tale' Team Breaks Down That "Abhorrent" Wedding Scene

[This story contains spoilers for season two, episode five of Hulu's The Handmaid's Tale, "Seeds."]

"Husbands and wives only, I'm afraid."

With six words, Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski) establishes the new status quo within the Waterford household. She and Fred (Joseph Fiennes) are not the only married couple within the residence anymore; guardian Nick Blaine (Max Minghella) has now joined the club, following one of the most upsetting scenes in Handmaid's Tale history — both to watch as a viewer and to participate in as a member of the cast and crew, according ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Team Talks June’s Breakdown and Nick’s New Relationship

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Team Talks June’s Breakdown and Nick’s New Relationship
Spoiler Alert: Do not read if you have not yet watched “Seeds,” the fifth episode of the second season of “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

Sometimes “The Handmaid’s Tale” showrunner Bruce Miller wants his Hulu dystopian drama to inspire the audience, and sometimes he wants the audience to inspire the characters in the show.

This is why, after a season and four episodes of allowing the audience to get “a sense of optimism from June, it was time to return the favor,” he tells Variety.

In the fifth episode of the second season, entitled “Seeds,” Offred/June’s (Elisabeth Moss
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Why Westworld and The Handmaid's Tale Are the Feminist Shows We Need Right Now

  • Popsugar
Image Source: HBO

The scarcity of dynamic women in television has been problematic for as long as TV has been a central aspect of the American home life. Women of my mother's generation were raised on visions of the perfect homemaker, à la June Cleaver, where the ideal woman was an amalgamation of chef, cleaning lady, advice giver, and shrugger-of-shoulders to the crazy antics of men. Just as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, with its landmark discussions of pay equity, changed the public perception of what it meant to be a woman, Westworld and The Handmaid's Tale have become the feminist anthems we need today.

Both shows, now in their second seasons, have done what would have been impossible only a couple of years ago: placing women at the helm of dramas that aren't exclusively marketed to women. In coupling with the movie successes of Girls Trip and Wonder Woman,
See full article at Popsugar »

‘The Handmaid’s Tale': Does June Escape Gilead in the Novel?

“The Handmaid’s Tale” on Hulu has been pretty good about Margaret Atwood’s novel on which it is based, but even early on, the show was expanding beyond the scope of the book.

In Season 2 of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” the story is stretching into all-new territory, following June (Elisabeth Moss) in the immediate aftermath of the big cliffhanger in Season 1. That cliffhanger left June’s life seemingly imperiled as she was placed in the back of a van with no explanation as to what was happening, raising the question of whether the authorities of Gilead had discovered her work with the insurgent Mayday organization.

In fact, though, June found herself safe, thanks to the fact that she was pregnant — seemingly with Nick (Max Minghella) as the father. That caused Nick to help June get away from Commander Waterford (Joseph Fiennes), hiding her at the former offices of the Boston Herald until someone could sneak her out of the country?

Also Read: 10 Hulu Originals You Should Be Watching, From 'The Path' to 'Handmaid's Tale' (Photos)

But is June’s escape covered in the novel? The answer to that question is a resounding: no. In fact, Atwood’s book ends, or at least June’s story does, when she steps up into that van, unsure of her fate.

After the narrative portion, in which June tells her story, the book version of “The Handmaid’s Tale” changes, taking readers to an academic lecture in 2195. The frame presents June’s story as a recording recovered years after the fall of Gilead, but it makes clear that her story took place in the early portion of a regime that lasted for years.

The scholar giving the lecture, Professor James Darcy Pieixoto, explains that while June’s story provides a lot of information about the inner workings of Gilead, it’s incomplete. In fact, while the show makes it clear that the handmaid Offred is named June Osbourne, her real name is never explicit in the books, and is instead left open to interpretation by the reader. Pieixoto notes that it’s extremely difficult for historians to find out what happened to a lot of people, including Offred, because of the changes to their names.

Also Read: Top 25 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)

So right now, “The Handmaid’s Tale” is in off-book territory. While aspects of Season 2, like the portions that concern June’s mother, are largely adapted from material in the book, the show is expanding June’s story beyond what Atwood originally wrote. Fans won’t be able to look to the novel to predict where “The Handmaid’s Tale” is headed next.

Read original story ‘The Handmaid’s Tale': Does June Escape Gilead in the Novel? At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

We're Obsessed With Nick in The Handmaid's Tale and We're Not Even Sorry

Image Source: Hulu

The highly anticipated second season of The Handmaid's Tale launched last week with Hulu releasing the first two episodes. We were happy to see Nick, played by the low-key sexy Max Minghella, in both episodes. You'll remember Nick as Commander Waterford's driver who soon becomes June's secret lover. You can safely say that men are not high up on the chain of who we're rooting for in this show, as most men in Gilead spend their time on screen torturing, degrading, and punishing women. Nick is different, we hope.

You will no doubt recognize Minghella from prominent roles in films like The Social Network (below), The Ides of March, and The Internship. Before his role on The Handmaid's Tale, he cut his TV teeth with a recurring role on The Mindy Project (also a Hulu property). He is not a superstar, yet, but The Handmaid's Tale is certainly upping his TV cred.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Jenny Slate, Alex Sharp, Zach Galifianakis, Gillian Anderson board 'The Sunlit Night' (exclusive)

Jenny Slate, Alex Sharp, Zach Galifianakis, Gillian Anderson board 'The Sunlit Night' (exclusive)
Jessica Hecht also starring in feature for Look Who’s Back director David Wnendt.

Jenny Slate (Obvious Child) is set to star in and produce The Sunlit Night for director David Wnendt (Look Who’s Back).

Also cast are Tony award-winning actor Alex Sharp (The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time), Gillian Anderson (The X-Files), Zach Galifianakis (The Hangover) and Jessica Hecht (Breaking Bad).

Mister Smith Entertainment is launching sales on the project in Cannes.

The Sunlit Night is adapted from Rebecca Dinerstein’s novel of the same name. The film is a German-Norwegian co-production between DETAiLFILM in
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Handmaid's Tale on Hulu: Cancelled or Renewed for Season Three?

Vulture Watch What will become of Offred? Has The Handmaid's Tale TV show been cancelled or renewed for a third season on Hulu? The television vulture is watching all the latest TV cancellation and renewal news, so this page is the place to track the status of The Handmaid's Tale, season three. Bookmark it, or subscribe for the latest updates. Remember, the television vulture is watching your shows. Are you?   What's This TV Show About? A Hulu drama based on the Margaret Atwood novel, The Handmaid's Tale stars Elizabeth Moss, Joseph Fiennes, Yvonne Strahovski, Samira Wiley, Alexis Bledel, Max Minghella, Madeline Brewer, Ann Dowd, and O-t Fagbenle. The dystopian tale tells the story of life under the totalitarian government of Gilead, which was formerly part of the U.S. The catastrophic state of the environment has devastated the birth rate, so fertile women
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

The Handmaid's Tale: Season Three; Hulu Orders New Installment of Margaret Atwood Drama

Offred's freedom fight moves forward. Hulu has renewed The Handmaid's Tale TV show for a third season, with a start date Tbd. The Handmaid's Tale season three renewal comes just three episodes into the second season of the dystopia drama. A Hulu drama based on the Margaret Atwood novel, The Handmaid’s Tale stars Elizabeth Moss, Joseph Fiennes, Yvonne Strahovski, Samira Wiley, Alexis Bledel, Max Minghella, Madeline Brewer, Ann Dowd, and O-t Fagbenle. The story centers on life under the totalitarian government of Gilead, which was formerly part of the U.S. The catastrophic state of the environment has devastated the birth rate, so fertile women have become a commodity enslaved by the ruling class. Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Season 3 Is a Go, After Season 2 Doubles the Dystopian Drama’s Audience

  • Indiewire
The Emmy-winning tale is far from over. Wednesday morning, as part of its 2018 Upfronts presentation, Hulu officially announced that “The Handmaid’s Tale” would be returning for a third season.

Also, as part of its 2018 upfront announcement, Hulu also revealed that it has surpassed 20 million U.S. subscribers. It also touted that total engagement on Hulu has grown by more than 60 percent — and bragged that “that’s a stat you won’t hear” from cable and broadcast networks during their upfront presentations. In addition, Hulu reported that 78% of viewing on the service takes place in the living room, on connected TVs.

It’s not shocking that “The Handmaid’s Tale” received a Season 3 greenlight, given how many trophies the show has brought home for Hulu (including eight Emmy awards and a Peabody). But according to the official release, the show’s Season 2 premiere broke records for the platform, doubling the
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Renewed for Season 3 at Hulu

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Renewed for Season 3 at Hulu
Hulu has renewed “The Handmaid’s Tale” for a third season.

The order for another installment of the Emmy-winning drama comes just one week after the debut of its second season. The show has become a signature original series for Hulu, which claims that it is the most watched show, original or acquired, on the streaming service.

At last year’s Primetime Emmy Awards, “The Handmaid’s Tale” took eight awards — tied with HBO’s “Big Little Lies” for the second most, behind NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” — including best drama series, best actress in a drama series for star Elisabeth Moss,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Handmaid's Tale: Season Two Viewer Votes

How goes Offred's struggle for freedom during the second season of The Handmaid's Tale TV show on Hulu? The Nielsen ratings would typically play a big role in determining whether a TV show like The Handmaid's Tale is cancelled or renewed for season three. Hulu and other streaming platforms, however, collect their own data. If you've been watching this TV series, we'd love to know how you feel about The Handmaid's Tale season two episodes. We invite you to rate them for us, below. A Hulu drama based on the Margaret Atwood novel, The Handmaid's Tale stars Elizabeth Moss, Joseph Fiennes, Yvonne Strahovski, Samira Wiley, Alexis Bledel, Max Minghella, Madeline Brewer, Ann Dowd, and O-t Fagbenle. The dystopian tale tells the story of life under the totalitarian government of Gilead, which was formerly part of the U.S.
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

The Handmaid's Tale: Season Three Renewal Coming? Showrunner Signs Overall Deal with Hulu

Season two of The Handmaid's Tale just premiered a few days ago, but what about season three? According to The Hollywood Reporter, showrunner Bruce Miller has just signed a new deal with Hulu.Based on the novel by Margaret Atwood, the drama takes place in a dystopian society where women are considered sexual property. The cast includes Elisabeth Moss, Joseph Fiennes, Yvonne Strahovski, Samira Wiley, Max Minghella, Madeline Brewer, Ann Dowd, O-t Fagbenle, Amanda Brugel, and Alexis Bledel.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Why Westworld and The Handmaid's Tale Are the Feminist Shows We Need Right Now

  • BuzzSugar
Image Source: HBO

The scarcity of dynamic women in television has been problematic for as long as TV has been a central aspect of the American home life. Women of my mother's generation were raised on visions of the perfect homemaker, à la June Cleaver, where the ideal woman was an amalgamation of chef, cleaning lady, advice giver, and shrugger-of-shoulders to the crazy antics of men. Just as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, with its landmark discussions of pay equity, changed the public perception of what it meant to be a woman, Westworld and The Handmaid's Tale have become the feminist anthems we need today.

Both shows, now in their second seasons, have done what would have been impossible only a couple of years ago: placing women at the helm of dramas that aren't exclusively marketed to women. In coupling with the movie successes of Girls Trip and Wonder Woman,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

The Handmaid's Tale: The 5 Most Heartbreaking Moments in Episode 2

Warning: Spoilers for The Handmaid's Tale season two, episode two below.

If you're here, then you deserve a big round of applause - you survived the first brutal, bloody, bleak-as-f*ck episode of The Handmaid's Tale season two! Sure, June finally escapes her harrowing situation with Aunt Lydia and the Waterfords, but is her freedom going to last? Will she and Nick stay together? Where's Ofglen/Emily these days? Oh, and do you think Hulu will start paying for group therapy sessions? Because I think we all might need it after the second episode, which answers most of the above questions. Let's get to it, shall we?

Related: Confused About That Brutal Moment in The Handmaid's Tale Premiere? We Can Help 1. June's Life at the Boston Globe

Nick (Max Minghella) sends June (Elisabeth Moss) packing to a new safe house, and this time it's in a well-known Boston building: the
See full article at BuzzSugar »

17 ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Authoritarians, Ranked From Bad to Exceedingly Evil (Photos)

  • The Wrap
17 ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Authoritarians, Ranked From Bad to Exceedingly Evil (Photos)
The dystopian, women-subjugating society of “The Handmaid’s Tale” is full of people who willingly sign on with its evil. Whether they’re the leaders who created the place or just collaborators willing to go along, the show is full of people willing to watch others suffer every day — and even inflict that suffering. Here are 17 such folks, ranked by how much they sign on with Gilead’s evil agenda.

Nick (Max Minghella)

Nick’s not a bad guy, and he’s trapped in Gilead like a lot of people, but he’s still a cog in the machine. At most, he uses his position to help June (Elisabeth Moss) where he can. He’s mostly still standing by and letting everything happen to her, though, and as far as their relationship is concerned, she’s the one taking all the risks.

That One Aunt (Margaret Atwood)

The author of “The Handmaid’s Tale” only gets a quick cameo, but as an aunt at the Red Center, her character is undoubtedly embracing the awfulness of Gilead. And she gets to smack June while she’s there.

Also Read: 10 Hulu Originals You Should Be Watching, From 'The Path' to 'Handmaid's Tale' (Photos)

The Boat Driver (Marvin Kaye)

When people were fleeing Gilead, this guy was willing to take them across the border in his boat. He was also willing to profit by the situation as much as possible, gouging Luke for whatever he could pay for his passage. He might not be a part of the government, but he’s bad enough to take advantage of its rise.

Jezebels’ Martha (Elena Khan)

Informing for the government is a good way to take care of yourself at the expense of everyone else. Nick’s Martha friend is willing to sell out the people around her — and people like her are essential to keeping the oppressive system working.

Ambassador Castillo (Zabryna Guevara)

The Mexican ambassador who meets with the Commander isn’t responsible for the way Gilead treats women, but she’s obviously willing to look the other way when it comes to its policies. Even when June tells her how bad things are, she’s unwilling to do much — and if Mexico is entering into trade with Gilead for handmaidens, she’s not only looking the other way on slavery, she’s about to facilitate it.

Burke (Jim Cummings)

The interrogator who questions June about Ofglen likes to start his discussions a certain way: with a cattle prod. A government lackey, a brutal interrogator and someone who persecutes women, Burke is an “investigator” whose clearly relishes his job and the power it gives him.

Also Read: Top 24 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)

Emma Monroe (Christy Bruce)

Mere hours after separating her from her child, Commander Monroe and his wife Emma have the handmaid Janine (Madeline Brewer) ready for another “ceremony.” It’s a reinforcement that even among the “nice” commanders and their wives, handmaids are seen as little more than animals.

Naomi Putnam (Ever Carradine)

Mrs. Putnam is the “wife” whose handmaid, Janine, actually has a baby, a somewhat rare occurrence. Like with June, Putnam is nice to her handmaid right up until the baby is born. After that, Naomi can’t wait to get rid of the other women and go back to treating her and the other handmaids like property.

The Doctor (Kristian Brunn)

The gynecologist June visits early in Season 1 propositions June, making it clear he’s regularly taking advantage of handmaids for sex. That makes him a guy who manages to take the extremely awful world he lives in and make it even more gross.

The Judge (Thomas Hauff)

When June’s friend Ofglen is discovered for being a lesbian with another woman, this guy sentences Ofglen’s lover to death and Ofglen to mutilation. Not only is he perfectly comfortable with those sentences and without even giving the women a chance to defend themselves, but it’s a look into the way Gilead systematizes women as lesser people.

Also Read: Top 20 Best HBO Original Series, From 'Six Feet Under' to 'Game of Thrones' (Photos)

Commander Monroe (Matthew Olver)

Monroe might be considered a “nice” commander, but he’s still a leader of the regime and must have played a part in both its coming to power and in its continuing terrible ways. Plus, like his wife, he’s instantly ready to treat Janine like someone who’s less than human.

Commander Pryce (Robert Curtis Brown)

Pryce seems like the paranoid commander, and other than Commander Waterford, he comes off as the most devout. But he’s still in the car with the others, coming up with the best way to brand the idea of all the commanders taking on concubines and making it sound biblical. Ultimately, the commanders don’t even believe their own lies, and Pryce is obviously just trying to consolidate his own power.

Commander Guthrie (Christian Lloyd)

Of the leaders of the movement, Guthrie seems to be the most truthful. He’s a jerk who doesn’t really care about the religion side, but it’s his idea to create the handmaids expressly for the purpose of breeding. Where the other leaders are hypocrites, they at least hide it well. Guthrie’s just in this for the gross, exploitative power.

Commander Putnam (Stephen Kunken)

Putnam has an extra layer of horrific to add to the usual awfulness of the commanders. He convinced his handmaid, Janine, that he was going to run away with her. His lie got him what he wanted from her, but it helped ruin Janine even more.

Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd)

The scary thing about Aunt Lydia is she comes off like a true believer. She’s fully committed to forcing handmaids into a life of rape and servitude, and she seems to enjoy wrecking the women who don’t immediately respect her with her cattle prod. She and people like her are essential to making subjugation work because she buys in, and has no problem hurting anyone who doesn’t.

Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski)

Talk about your all-time backfires. Serena Joy got everything she ever thought she wanted. Her book touted the great world she would help create, and yet she seemingly didn’t realize that advocating to make women second-class citizens would include her too. That means she’s marginalized by the people she helped elevate, and she’s angry enough about it to use her own power to ruin the lives of the people below her. She just can’t stop being fully awful.

The Commander (Joseph Fiennes)

The worst thing about the Commander is that he plays nice. He invites June to his room for games of Scrabble and, in private, treats her like a real person. But even his acts of kindness are actually clear methods of enforcing his power over people — he knows June can’t really challenge him, and he likes to wield his ability to be nice to her as something he can easily take away. It’s almost worse that he sometimes treats her well, because every act of kindness comes with the tacit feeling of being in his debt, as well as under his whim.

Read original story 17 ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Authoritarians, Ranked From Bad to Exceedingly Evil (Photos) At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »
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