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‘Cost of a Soul’: Blood, Sweat and Tears

By Sean Kirkpatrick (writer-director, “Cost of a Soul”)

(May 2011)

It all began with Francis Ford Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now.” Although it is one of my favorites, the movie itself was not what inspired me to become a filmmaker. Rather it was the sadistic realization of the pain, struggle and hardship that must go into creating something you so strongly believe in.

I saw filmmaking as my opportunity to conquer the “impossible.” I was enraptured by the amount of determination, persistence and purpose put into the making of Coppola’s 1979 masterpiece. From that point on, my life was dedicated to conquering the impossible, and I would forge myself into a talented writer-director or die trying.

It was because of the tenacity I learned from “Apocalypse Now” that I was able to make my first feature film, a film that was also said to be “impossible.”

After graduating from college and working
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »

‘Cost of a Soul’: Blood, Sweat and Tears

By Sean Kirkpatrick (writer-director, “Cost of a Soul”)

(May 2011)

It all began with Francis Ford Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now.” Although it is one of my favorites, the movie itself was not what inspired me to become a filmmaker. Rather it was the sadistic realization of the pain, struggle and hardship that must go into creating something you so strongly believe in.

I saw filmmaking as my opportunity to conquer the “impossible.” I was enraptured by the amount of determination, persistence and purpose put into the making of Coppola’s 1979 masterpiece. From that point on, my life was dedicated to conquering the impossible, and I would forge myself into a talented writer-director or die trying.

It was because of the tenacity I learned from “Apocalypse Now” that I was able to make my first feature film, a film that was also said to be “impossible.”

After graduating from college and working
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

It Was a Very Good Year

  • Backstage
Scott Winters filmed his scene with Mel Gibson in the movie Edge of Darkness, was given a trailer for his two days on set, and was able to persuade a casting director to let him see his audition tape for a role he did not get. Why did you want to look at the tape? I felt like I really nailed the audition. I thought that if I could see it, I would be better able to trust my instincts. As an actor, you're always playing an invisible instrument, or one you can't see. As it happened, my performance looked like what it felt like. What was the trailer like? It was a half-trailer. I had a couch and a recliner, a TV, a fridge, and a microwave. I was jumping up and down I was so excited. I felt a little bit like I had arrived. Then I sat
See full article at Backstage »

See also

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