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Film Review: ‘The Other Man: F.W. de Klerk and the End of Apartheid’

While we surely haven’t seen the last biopic dedicated to his political foil, collaborator and Nobel co-winner Nelson Mandela, filmmakers have proven more resistant to the complex, compromised life and legacy of F.W. de Klerk, South Africa’s final pre-democracy president. For reasons of balance alone, then, Nicolas Rossier’s no-frills documentary “The Other Man: F.W. de Klerk and the End of Apartheid” is welcome: A mostly diplomatic attempt to paint a fuller portrait of the country’s most rapidly transformative political period for what one of its talking heads refers to as the “Born Free generation.” Yet it’s an opportunity only half-seized: haphazard both as biography and historical survey, the film asks more salient questions than it can answer in a rushed 76 minutes.

For those who didn’t witness the transition first-hand, it’s easy to underestimate de Klerk’s necessarily self-defeating role in bringing South
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Plot For Peace Review

  • HeyUGuys
The opening shot to this fascinating documentary shows an unassuming man playing a card game, accompanied by a voiceover. The setting itself feels theatrical, as though subsequent events are a new fictional-feature spin on the release of one of the world’s most iconic statesmen, Nelson Mandela, and the end of Apartheid in South Africa. We soon learn that this is French-Algerian businessman and international diplomat Jean-Yves Ollivier, known as ‘Monsieur Jacques’. He’s real and has quite a story to tell, doing so in an unanticipated fashion.

This well-kept ‘secret weapon’ behind Mandela’s release is supported by on-camera confirmation from a ‘star-studded cast’, including Winnie Mandela (Anc activist and Mandela’s ex), Thabo Mbeki (former President of South Africa) and even Pik Botha (former Minister of Foreign Affairs for South Africa at the time), plus other heads of state, generals, diplomats, master spies, etc. The film skilfully uses
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Details For Nationwide Q+As For Upcoming ‘Documentary Thriller’ ‘Plot For Peace’

Heading to cinemas on the 14th March is the superb documentary Plot For Peace, and in the days leading up to release the film’s distributors are putting on some special Q+A’s this week, up and down the country. More on that in a second. First, here’s a little more about the movie.

Plot For Peace is a documentary thriller that tells an untold story behind the secret events leading up to the end of apartheid and ultimately the release of Nelson Mandela.

To some, such as South Africa’s former President Thabo Mbeki, Jean-Yves Ollivier (alias “Monsieur Jacques”) was a mysterious businessman and sanctions buster or a French spy. For others, such as Winnie Mandela and Mozambique’s former President Joaquim Chissano, he was a trusted friend and a man of bold vision.

For the first time, heads of state, generals, diplomats, master spiesand anti-apartheid fighters
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Nelson Mandela in the movies

In film, the role of the former Anc activist and president of South Africa has traditionally been approached with great reverence

The voice. The gentle, mysterious smile. The walk – generally an older man's walk, across a garden, or presidential office, or prison exercise yard. The enigmatically polite manner: intimidating, even awe-inspiring for allies and adversaries alike. The list of actors who have tried all this is long: Morgan Freeman, David Harewood, Terrence Howard, Danny Glover, Sidney Poitier, Clarke Peters, Dennis Haysbert, Idris Elba – and Lindane Nkosi, the one South African actor who has managed to make some sort of impression as this character in Anglo-Hollywood circles, for a film called Drum, about the 1950s anti-apartheid campaign, that played at festivals in London and Cannes.

Nelson Mandela has been a role to be approached reverently, a difficult part and a career hurdle in some ways, like a royal figure in a Shakespearian play,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Chiwetel Ejiofor: 'In theatre the fear lurks all the time'

Chiwetel Ejiofor talks about his return to the London stage to play murdered African hero Patrice Lumumba in A Season in the Congo – and his emotional trip to the Congo to prepare for it

You have the sense talking to Chiwetel Ejiofor that he would always be prepared to go the extra mile. On screen and off he has a self-deprecating, generous spirit, quick to laugh, but he also carries a watchful air, a real openness to the moment. Directors – from Woody Allen to Spike Lee to Stephen Poliakoff – see this in him too. From his breakthrough role in Stephen Frears's 2002 film Dirty Pretty Things in which Ejiofor so memorably played the illegal immigrant doctor, Okwe, moonlighting as a minicab driver in London, he has been the go-to man for a particular kind of optimistic and highly credible intensity.

He seems fated to certain roles. He made a natural
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Chiwetel Ejiofor: 'In theatre the fear lurks all the time'

Chiwetel Ejiofor talks about his return to the London stage to play murdered African hero Patrice Lumumba in A Season in the Congo – and his emotional trip to the Congo to prepare for it

You have the sense talking to Chiwetel Ejiofor that he would always be prepared to go the extra mile. On screen and off he has a self-deprecating, generous spirit, quick to laugh, but he also carries a watchful air, a real openness to the moment. Directors – from Woody Allen to Spike Lee to Stephen Poliakoff – see this in him too. From his breakthrough role in Stephen Frears's 2002 film Dirty Pretty Things in which Ejiofor so memorably played the illegal immigrant doctor, Okwe, moonlighting as a minicab driver in London, he has been the go-to man for a particular kind of optimistic and highly credible intensity.

He seems fated to certain roles. He made a natural
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Theron Moved To Tears by Mandela

  • WENN
Theron Moved To Tears by Mandela
Oscar-winner Charlize Theron broke down in tears after former South African President Nelson Mandela praised her for putting their country on the map. The actress - who picked up the Best Actress prize for her role as a serial-killing prostitute in Monster at last month's Academy Awards - was guest of honor at the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg yesterday. Mandela said of Theron, "She has put South Africa on the map. Even those who were ignorant of this place, having seen her, they must know that there is a country like South Africa." Wiping away her tears, the 28-year-old star told Mandela "I love you so much". Her meeting with Mandela comes just days after current president Thabo Mbeki congratulated Theron on her achievement. The actress left South Africa when she was 16, after a traumatic childhood - she witnessed her mother kill her violent father.

Mbeki Congratulations Theron

  • WENN
Mbeki Congratulations Theron
Hollywood beauty Charlize Theron was presented with an ounce of gold as she met South African president Thabo Mbeki on Monday. The Benoni-born actress returned to her homeland to share her Oscar success with her countrypeople after winning the Best Actress award for Monster last month. Mbeki invited Theron to meet him in a government guesthouse in Pretoria. The Premier enthused, "Very well done, Charlize. Excellent. The whole country is very proud." Mbeki handed the 28-year-old a box containing an ounce of gold ingrained in the rock in which it was formed and the wording, "Presented to Charlize Theron, our South African star, by President Thabo Mbeki." Theron gushes, "It's gorgeous. This has been lovely. It's been such a warm welcome."

Theron's Oscar Win Causes Sensation Back Home

  • WENN
Theron's Oscar Win Causes Sensation Back Home
Oscar-winning actress Charlize Theron has been praised by South African leader President Thabo Mbeki for making the country proud of her. The 28-year-old actress - who was raised in South Africa - was named Best Actress at Sunday's Academy Awards ceremony in Hollywood for her performance in Monster. And Theron is now being touted as a figurehead of South African strength following her success - the actress witnessed her mother Gerda shoot her drunk father Charles dead in 1991, following a period of domestic abuse. President Mbeki says, "It's a triumph of new South African opportunity. In the film we saw her drawing on her innate tough-mindedness and her emotional stamina in overcoming the tragic personal circumstances of her early life to shine. Miss Theron, in her personal life, represents a grand metaphor of South Africa's move from agony to achievement. We rejoice in the recognition by most critical minds in filming that Charlize Theron is pure gold." But, despite Monster's widespread recognition, Theron's hometown of Benoni will not get to see the film - because local film bosses think it's too highbrow. A spokesman for South African movie distributor Nu Metro says, "The film caters for a particular niche. The people of Benoni would prefer to see Charlize in movies like The Italian Job."

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