Ben Semanoff - News Poster

News

Tulsa King TV Review

  • JoBlo
Tulsa King TV Review
Plot: Follows New York mafia capo Dwight “The General” Manfredi, after he is released from prison after 25 years and is unceremoniously exiled by his boss to set up shop in Tulsa, Okla. Realizing that his mob family may not have his best interests in mind, Dwight slowly builds a crew from a group of unlikely characters to help him establish a new criminal empire in a place that to him might as well be another planet.

Review: Paramount loves Taylor Sheridan. With Yellowstone consistently ranking as one of the most watched shows on television, Sheridan’s creative output has expanded with sequels, prequels, and spin-offs of the Montana-set drama along with separate projects like Mayor of Kingstown starring Jeremy Renner. Sheridan’s latest project is Tulsa King, a unique twist on gangster stories led by Sylvester Stallone in his first small-screen leading role. With a heavy dose of inspiration from
See full article at JoBlo »

How to Watch Tulsa King Starring Sylvester Stallone

How to Watch Tulsa King Starring Sylvester Stallone
The Italian Stallion is back on the small screen and making his scripted show debut with Tulsa King. The crime drama series comes from Academy Award-nominee Taylor Sheridan (Hell or High Water) and Emmy Award winner Terence Winter (Boardwalk Empire), who also serves as the showrunner for the same. The plot of Tulsa King follows Sylvester Stallone as an indomitable mafia boss, Dwight Manfredi, who sets up a criminal organization in Tulsa, Oklahoma, post his release from prison after 25 years. Stallone also serves as one of the executive producers of the show. The series is directed by Benjamin Semanoff.
See full article at Collider.com »

‘One of Us is Lying’ Season 2 Preview: Trailer, Cast Info, and Plot Details

‘One of Us is Lying’ Season 2 Preview: Trailer, Cast Info, and Plot Details
The identity of snarky gossiper Simon Kelleher’s killer in season one was identified at the conclusion of Peacock’s One of Us is Lying season one. And, mini-spoiler alert, the gang took care of that problem (Rip Jake) but wound up creating a new one. Which, of course, leads us to season two.

The two-minute season two trailer reveals the Murder Club members will be tormented by “Simon Says” and forced into doing his/her bidding or else their involvement in Jake’s “disappearance” will be exposed. The trailer suggests the club should keep their friends close, but their secrets even closer.

Season two is set to premiere on October 20, 2022, however, New York Comic Con attendees were treated to a preview of the first episode along with a Q&a with the show’s stars. Showrunner/writer/executive producer Erica Saleh joined Marianly Tejada (“Bronwyn”), Chibuikem Uche (“Cooper”), Annalisa Cochrane
See full article at showbizjunkies »

How Laura Linney could pull a Jason Bateman at the Emmys with a directing win for ‘Ozark’

How Laura Linney could pull a Jason Bateman at the Emmys with a directing win for ‘Ozark’
While Laura Linney could finally nab her first Emmy for playing Wendy Byrde on “Ozark,” there is another way she can be rewarded for the Netflix drama this year: as the director of the fourth and final season’s 11th episode, “Pound of Flesh and Still Kickin’.” If submitted for this effort, her directorial debut, Linney could pull off a victory in a similar fashion to her co-star and onscreen hubby Jason Bateman, who still hasn’t earned an acting Emmy for the show but won directing when no one expected it in 2019.

Bateman was all the way down in sixth place in our odds when he won for the Season 2 opener, “Reparations.” But in retrospect, we shouldn’t have underestimated the eventual champ, who had built a ton of goodwill as one of the show’s stars, executive producers and main directors. By that point, he had directed six
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmy nominee Benjamin Semanoff (‘Ozark’) reveals how he learned to direct for Netflix drama [Exclusive Video Interview]

Emmy nominee Benjamin Semanoff (‘Ozark’) reveals how he learned to direct for Netflix drama [Exclusive Video Interview]
“My goal is for the audience member never ever to think about the construct of what they’re watching,” says Benjamin Semanoff in his exclusive interview with Gold Derby about directing and camera-operating for “Ozark” (watch the video above). He continues, “I want them never to realize that there was a human behind the camera at all. I want them almost to be hypnotized into a fantasy world, so when I watch good camerawork, I often realize that it was good because 10 minutes later, I go, ‘Oh my god, I have totally forgotten that I’m watching a television show’.” Semanoff muses further, “The movement of the camera, which again, is a very conscious, deliberate, thought-out process on set, should only be to support what’s happening or the perspective of the character you’re trying to connect with — and leaving things off camera is super interesting.”

SEEour video interview with “Ozark” editor Cindy Mollo.
See full article at Gold Derby »

7 of the Best One-Shot Action Sequences, From ‘Oldboy’ to ‘The Revenant’

7 of the Best One-Shot Action Sequences, From ‘Oldboy’ to ‘The Revenant’
Most single-shot sequences, aren’t. What you’d swear are single takes are actually seamless edits — but that doesn’t dilute their mind-bending power. Even better: one-take action sequences like the third-act corker in “Atomic Blonde,” which sees Charlize Theron battling scads of baddies in a longform, long-take sequence designed to look like a single shot.

David Deitch’s film is filled with heart-pounding action scenes (Theron cracked multiple teeth while filming the Cold War-set Berlin spy thriller), but it’s that big final battle that action fans will remember. And while “Atomic Blonde” feels fresh, the sequence takes plenty of cues from single-shots that have come before.

Read More‘Atomic Blonde’ Review: Charlize Theron Kicks Ass In Cold War Action-Thriller — SXSW 2017

Fans of both Theron and single-shot sequences can get a small taste of the ass-kicking to come in “Atomic Blonde” (for the really curious, the single-shot segment plays out mostly on the stairs,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cinematographer Maryse Alberti Talks Creed And Women In Film

Creed continues to be a box office success and a favorite with audiences and critics. Globally Ryan Coogler’s film has passed the $100 million mark since its initial opening this fall.

The film reunites Coogler with his Fruitvale Station star Michael B. Jordan as the son of Apollo Creed, and explores a new chapter in the Rocky story, starring Academy Award nominee Sylvester Stallone in his iconic role.

For the director, there was no question that Creed would be set in Philadelphia, where it all began. And for the filmmakers, there was no doubt that principal photography would be accomplished there as well. In order to bridge the two films artistically, Coogler brought together the talented creative team of costume designers Emma Potter (“Song One”) and Antoinette Messam (“Orphan”) and his “Fruitvale Station” team: editors Michael P. Shawver and Claudia Castello; production designer Hannah Beachler; and composer Ludwig Goransson.

To
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

"Creed" Single Take Fight Scene Details

There's a ton of great moments in Ryan Coogler's "Rocky" spin-off film "Creed," but the most jaw-dropping takes place right in the middle of the film - the first professional boxing match of Adonis (Michael B. Jordan).

The entire boxing match, with multiple rounds, is seemingly presented in one single take. The camera is right in the fight throughout, ducking and weaving right up close between the two opponents and will then drift to the trainers yelling instructions or Adonis' girlfriend in the crowd yelling support.

You can see just a sample of the sequence below, the entire scene runs for several minutes in the final film.

New details about the scene have been revealed in a new interview that Coogler and Jordan have given to Buzzfeed. The pair reveal that the scene was done in one shot and deliberately so with Coogler purposefully not shooting cutaways. Thirteen takes
See full article at Dark Horizons »

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed