News

Out of the past by Anne-Katrin Titze

Susanna Nicchiarelli‬ on Trine Dyrholm, the star of Thomas Vinterberg's Festen and The Commune: "I wanted to work with her because she's one of my favourite actresses." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In the second half of my conversation with Nico, 1988 director/screenwriter Susanna Nicchiarelli at The Roxy Hotel, we discuss how Trine Dyrholm worked on the character, going into the studio to record Nico's songs, the look from costume designers Francesca Vecchi and Roberta Vecchi, and Nico's sense of irony.

Trine Dyrholm will be on this year's Venice International Film Festival jury, headed by Guillermo del Toro along with Nicole Garcia, Taika Waititi, Naomi Watts, Sylvia Chang, Christoph Waltz, Paolo Genovese, and Malgorzata Szumowska.

Susanna Nicchiarelli on Trine Dyrholm the singer: "We took Nico's songs and went in the studio, she sang them and the character came out of there with the body language." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Dyrholm as
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The Absent Gaze: Navigating Feminist Cinematography

  • MUBI
The Milk of SorrowIs there such a thing as a female gaze? It’s an almost perversely complicated question. On one hand, no doubt women’s desire has its own unique manifestations. On the other, the gaze implies the mind, and the idea of a “female brain” inevitably leads to some unpleasant associations. Should we then let the question be?Don’t expect the current retrospective on view at New York’s Film Society of Lincoln Center and dedicated to the female gaze—highlighting the work of women cinematographers—to be able to answer it in any definitive way. Yet some of its most fascinating films suggest that women cinematographers—and filmmakers—are able to transmit the idea, and the disconcerting sensation of always questioning gender and the expectations it entails into thrilling cinematic experiences. Among these, the pairings where both filmmaker and cinematographer are female prove particularly striking.Take
See full article at MUBI »

Emilia Jones, George MacKay starring in thriller 'Nuclear' for Ffilm Cymru Wales, BFI (exclusive)

Emilia Jones, George MacKay starring in thriller 'Nuclear' for Ffilm Cymru Wales, BFI (exclusive)
The film is the directorial debut of ‘Dreaming Of Joseph Lees’ screenwriter Catherine Linstrum.

Emilia Jones and George MacKay are starring in supernatural thriller Nuclear, which is currently shooting in Wales.

The Ffilm Cymru Wales and BFI-backed project is from debut director Catherine Linstrum, whose previous work as a screenwriter includes California Dreamin’ and Dreaming Of Joseph Lees. Her short films include Nadger, which was a Bafta Cymru Award-winner.

The film was developed and is being produced through the second edition of Ffilm Cymru Wales’s low-budget Cinematic scheme, which is financed by the BFI, using National Lottery funding,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Reconstructed heroine by Anne-Katrin Titze

Susanna Nicchiarelli‬ on Nico's relationship with Alain Delon: "I don't mention him because I don't mention any of the men she was with except Jim Morrison. I think people's lives are much more complex than what movies usually tell us, especially biopics." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Nico, 1988, a highlight of the Tribeca Film Festival and the Best Film Horizons Award winner at the Venice Film Festival, stars Trine Dyrholm as Christa Päffgen. "This is Berlin, my darling, it's burning," says a mother to her daughter. The child is to become Andy Warhol and Velvet Underground icon Nico.

Susanna Nicchiarelli's extraordinary film, shot by Crystel Fournier is not about those most famous years (which flash onto the screen in snippets of archival footage), nor, with the exception of a few flashbacks, about her war time and postwar German childhood. In Nico, 1988 the focus is on 1986 and the following years when she
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Nico, 1988’ Review: Trine Dyrholm Brings the Chelsea Girl Back to Life in a Singular Biopic — Tribeca

‘Nico, 1988’ Review: Trine Dyrholm Brings the Chelsea Girl Back to Life in a Singular Biopic — Tribeca
A little girl stands on the outskirts of Berlin and watches from a distance as orange fire melts the city into a shapeless candied glow. Twenty years later, she reappears as a blonde chanteuse in Andy Warhol’s New York City, her stage name attached to one of the most influential records in the history of popular music. Twenty years after that, she sits in a Manchester radio station, patchy and strung out and shutting down any questions about her stint with The Velvet Underground — she’ll be dead in two years, but it looks as if she’s already decomposing.

The first 90 seconds of Susanna Nicchiarelli’s gloomy and grounded biopic visit all three of these periods (though the rest of it is almost exclusively set in the last one), “Nico, 1988” introducing its subject as someone who can’t extricate her present from her past. Several decades into a tortured and compelling solo career,
See full article at Indiewire »

6 Challenges Facing New Academy President John Bailey

6 Challenges Facing New Academy President John Bailey
As new Academy president John Bailey opens up about what he plans to do in his new job, we read the tea leaves. He faces an unusually tumultuous time, as the Academy confronts multiple challenges, from the industry’s transition to digital, and pressures from ABC to increase viewership of the Oscar show, to the need to raise more funding to build the troubled $400 million Academy Museum at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Here are Bailey’s main concerns. So far, he seems more than up to meeting this new assignment.

1. Will the Academy change its diversity outreach?

No. As someone who has long hired men and women of different ethnic, socio- economic, and racial backgrounds, Bailey supports Academy CEO Hudson’s outreach imperative via the A2020 program which is designed to double the Academy’s diverse membership by 2020. He’s proud of such Academy efforts as the Academy Gold internship program,
See full article at Indiewire »

6 Challenges Facing New Academy President John Bailey

6 Challenges Facing New Academy President John Bailey
As new Academy president John Bailey opens up about what he plans to do in his new job, we read the tea leaves. He faces an unusually tumultuous time, as the Academy confronts multiple challenges, from the industry’s transition to digital, and pressures from ABC to increase viewership of the Oscar show, to the need to raise more funding to build the troubled $400 million Academy Museum at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Here are Bailey’s main concerns. So far, he seems more than up to meeting this new assignment.

1. Will the Academy change its diversity outreach?

No. As someone who has long hired men and women of different ethnic, socio- economic, and racial backgrounds, Bailey supports Academy CEO Hudson’s outreach imperative via the A2020 program which is designed to double the Academy’s diverse membership by 2020. He’s proud of such Academy efforts as the Academy Gold internship program,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Paris Can Wait – Review

Can’t afford to pack your bags and embark on a vacation adventure in an exotic foreign land? No problem, just travel vicariously at the multiplex. Many different genre films have more than a bit of “travelogue” in them (one of the staples of “golden age” moviegoing was the double feature with several short subjects: cartoons, newsreels, comedy “two-reelers”, and the travelogue, sandwiched between the main films). One type of story often set in “faraway places’ is the “rom-com”. Oh, and a frequent star of such flicks is this film’s leading lady, Diane Lane (Under The Tuscan Sun, Nights In Rodanthe). Yes, we’re talking about Superman’s Earth mum (we’ll see her again in the role soon in Justice League). These stories and many other recent Lane films concern her character re-discovering love and desire, usually after a long-standing relationship has gone “phhfft”. Now she’s on
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A Place on Earth | Review

While You Were Peeping: Godet’s Elegy Brimming with Belabored Emotion

With his sophomore directorial effort, Fabienne Godet’s A Place on Earth (Une place sur la Terre) once again places Belgian actor Benoît Poelvoorde in the midst of a doomed romantic entanglement. Surprisingly, the generally comedic thespian excels at these melancholy, brooding types, as evidenced by recent stints in Jean-Pierre Ameris’ Romantics Anonymous (2010) and Benoit Jacquot’s Three Hearts (2014). As an uninspired photographer, Poelvoorde’s equally forlorn here, though he’s on the less dramatic end of the comparable occupationally challenged protagonist featured in Godet’s first feature, Burnt Out (2005). However, the film’s dramatic conflict inevitably ends up feeling a bit forced, the emotionally unstable natures of its romantic leads vaguely administered, which casts an extemporaneous pallor over the script that should leave us feeling as devastated as the roiling soundtrack and sweeping visuals urge.

A struggling photographer,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Wild Bunch unveils French slate

Sales company unveils new films by Donzelli, Sfar, Odoul and Garrel at Paris Rendez-vous.

Wild Bunch will kick off sales on nine new French titles at this year’s Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris (Jan 15-19), many of which will be completed in time for a potential Cannes slot, including an incestuous love story by Valérie Donzelli and First World War drama by Damien Odoul.

The company will also show first images of several previously announced productions including Jacques Audiard’s untitled drama revolving around Sri Lankan immigrants in Paris, which it is co-selling with Celluloid Dreams, and Julie Delpy’s France-set romance Lolo, in which she stars as a chic Parisian sophisticate who falls for a geeky It expert played by Dany Boon.

There will also be a promo-reel for Arnaud Desplechin’s My Golden Years (aka Three Memories of Childhood), revisiting the childhood of Paul Dédalus, the protagonist in his 1997 film My Sex Lifewho
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Girlhood Review [Tiff 2014]

The most talked-about film of 2014 so far has been Richard Linklater’s opus of adolescence, Boyhood. Unfortunately, the buzz surrounding it could have a negative effect on Girlhood, which despite its titular commonality, is a very different beast of a film. Bold and beautiful, filled with pain and pleasure, and featuring a throbbing soundtrack and propulsive energy, Celine Sciamma’s drama has also been a festival darling.

Unlike Boyhood, which focuses on the coming-of-age of a blonde white boy who is aimless and filled with angst, Girlhood is about a black teenage girl in France, fighting with her own identity and yearning to break free. It is an invigorating slice of life that feels much more specific, urgent and relatable, and it may even be finer than Boyhood.

Sciamma’s drama focuses on Marieme (Karidja Touré), a shy schoolgirl who initially has more boyish interests. (In the film’s rather radical opening scene,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Visually Striking Canadian-French Production 'Dreams of Dust' Is An Understated Tale of Grief & Hope

The minimalist, beautifully photographed, Canadian-French production Dreams of Dust (Reves De Poussiere) was a Grand Jury nominee at 2007’s Sundance film festival. The film, directed by French filmmaker Laurent Salgues – his impressive feature debut - won prizes at Spain’s 2007’s Tarifa, France’s 2006’s Amiens and Belgium’s Namur film festivals. It’s not a film for everyone. It’s one of those laconic narratives that permeate into your psyche and gain your appreciation for days after watching it. The splendid cinematography by Crystel Fournier showcasing the film’s wind-swept motifs is so striking that it’s almost like viewing a piece of art. Dreams of Dust takes place in the West...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Netflix Picks: Visually Striking 'Dreams of Dust' Is An Understated Tale of Grief & Hope

The minimalist, beautifully photographed, Canadian-French production Dreams of Dust (Reves De Poussiere) was a Grand Jury nominee at 2007’s Sundance film festival. The film, directed by French filmmaker Laurent Salgues – his impressive feature debut - won prizes at Spain’s 2007’s Tarifa, France’s 2006’s Amiens and Belgium’s Namur film festivals. It’s not a film for everyone. It’s one of those laconic narratives that permeate into your psyche and gain your appreciation for days after watching it. The splendid cinematography by Crystel Fournier showcasing the film’s wind-swept motifs is so striking that it’s almost like...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Céline Sciamma's "Tomboy"

  • MUBI
"A sensitive portrait of childhood just before pubescence — when bodies and identities are still fluid — Tomboy astutely explores the freedom, however brief, of being untethered to the highly rule-bound world of gender codes." Melissa Anderson in the Voice: "The second movie by writer-director Céline Sciamma, Tomboy is expansive and relaxed, a marked contrast to her debut, the promising but overdetermined and airless Water Lilies (2007), which centered on the erupting desires of a trio of 15-year-old girls. Sciamma shows a real gift for capturing kids at play, an arena that is simultaneously anarchic and regimented. She and her cinematographer, Crystel Fournier, film the August afternoons devoted to truth or dare, capture the flag, soccer, and water fights as their own otherworldly time zone — idyllic, adult-free hours when hierarchies are formed, toppled, and reconfigured."

"Laure [Zoé Heran] is ten years old, thin as a twig — possibly thinner — and tentative about moving to a new place with her family,
See full article at MUBI »

‘Tomboy’ – Building a compelling drama around what is described as “the story of a lie”

Tomboy

Written and directed by Céline Sciamma

2011, France

Gwyneth Paltrow sported a fake moustache in Shakespeare in Love and Hilary Swank stuffed a sock down her jeans for Boys Don’t Cry. For Laure, the young heroine of Tomboy, it’s a tub of Play-Doh that helps prolong her dream of being one of the boys – at least for the summer.

Laure (Zoé Héran) has recently moved to a new neighbourhood, with her pregnant mum (Sophie Cattani), dad (Mathieu Demy) and younger sister Jeanne (Malonn Lévana). With her short hair, baggy T-shirts and lack of interest in dolls, Laure could pass for a boy. So when one of the local kids Lisa (Jeanne Disson) makes that assumption, Laure is quick to assume the identity of Michael.

Building a compelling drama around what she calls “the story of a lie”, writer/director Céline Sciamma once again shows that she’s well
See full article at SoundOnSight »

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed