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Father’s Day: Top 16 best Oscar-winning dad performances include Gregory Peck, Dustin Hoffman, Daniel Day-Lewis, Henry Fonda

  • Gold Derby
Father’s Day: Top 16 best Oscar-winning dad performances include Gregory Peck, Dustin Hoffman, Daniel Day-Lewis, Henry Fonda
How would you like to spend a special Father’s Day with your dad? Here’s a suggestion — why not sit down for a couple of hours and watch one of these movies that’s all about fathers, both terrific and horrible? Our ranked photo gallery above includes many fine suggestions, all of which feature an Oscar-winning performance by an actor who plays a father where that role was pivotal to the plot.

Though there are thousands of films in which one character happens to be a father, you won’t find them all on this list. Besides the fact that these 16 films contain a paternal performance that won an Academy Award, they show a wide array of what it means to be a father. There’s the courageous father, the inspirational dad, the loving father and even the monstrous father. Lead and supporting actors include Daniel Day-Lewis, Dustin Hoffman,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Barbra Streisand Talks Career Choices, New Directorial Effort at Netflix FYSee

Barbra Streisand Talks Career Choices, New Directorial Effort at Netflix FYSee
Barbra Streisand sat down with Jamie Foxx at Raleigh Studios for a conversation about her Netflix special, “Barbra: The Music… The Mem’ries… The Magic!” on Sunday. The multi-hyphenate also described the prejudice she faced coming from the music industry to the film business.

“When I made ‘Yentl,’ my first directorial job, people were like, ‘You’re going to direct? You mean an actress can direct and be fiscally responsible for the budget?’ It’s interesting, in the music business, there is no gender discrimination,” Streisand recalled. “It’s like if you’re woman or a man, it’s who sells [the] most records.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Big Country

Ya know, “It’s a Big Country!” Westerns and pacifism are like oil and water, but William Wyler, Jessamyn West and three other top writers found a way for Gregory Peck to surmount eight showdowns and never fire a pistol in anger. Jean Simmons and Charlton Heston win top acting honors, while Burl Ives earns his Oscar, Carroll Baker gets the thankless role and composer Jerome Moross makes western music history. MGM’s remastering job fixes the problems of an earlier Blu-ray, and even brings the title sequence up to tip top condition. Plus several hours of special extras.

The Big Country

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1958 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 166 min. / Street Date June 5, 2018 / 60th Anniversary Edition / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker, Charlton Heston, Burl Ives, Charles Bickford, Alfonso Bedoya, Chuck Connors, Chuck Hayward, Dorothy Adams, Chuck Roberson.

Cinematography: Franz F. Planer

Film Editor: Robert Swink
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Back to One, Episode Six: Lee Grant on Strasberg vs. Meisner, Being Directed by Mike Nichols and More

I finished Lee Grant’s incredible autobiography I Said Yes To Everything right before sitting down with her and that was a huge mistake, only because it was frustrating to have such a limited time with the legendary actress after reading her extraordinary story. Consider this episode a tiny drop in the ocean of this astounding life. She was nominated for an Oscar for her first screen role in William Wyler’s Detective Story and then was blacklisted by Huac for 12 long, painful years. She rebuilt her career with roles in Peyton Place, In The Heat Of The Night, and Shampoo […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Back to One, Episode Six: Lee Grant on Strasberg vs. Meisner, Being Directed by Mike Nichols and More

I finished Lee Grant’s incredible autobiography I Said Yes To Everything right before sitting down with her and that was a huge mistake, only because it was frustrating to have such a limited time with the legendary actress after reading her extraordinary story. Consider this episode a tiny drop in the ocean of this astounding life. She was nominated for an Oscar for her first screen role in William Wyler’s Detective Story and then was blacklisted by Huac for 12 long, painful years. She rebuilt her career with roles in Peyton Place, In The Heat Of The Night, and Shampoo […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Mother’s Day: Top 18 best Oscar-winning mom performances ranked, including Shirley MacLaine, Brie Larson

  • Gold Derby
Mother’s Day: Top 18 best Oscar-winning mom performances ranked, including Shirley MacLaine, Brie Larson
How would you like to spend a special Mother’s Day with your Mom? Here’s a suggestion — why not sit down for a couple of hours and watch one of these movies that’s all about mothers, both terrific and horrible? Our ranked photo gallery above includes many fine suggestions, all of which feature an Oscar-winning performance by an actress who plays a mother where that role was pivotal to the plot.

Though there are thousands of films in which one character happens to be a mother, you won’t find them all on this list. Besides the fact that these 18 films contain a maternal performance that won an Academy Award, they show a wide array of what it means to be a mother. There’s the courageous mother, the inspirational mom, the loving mother and even the monstrous mother. Lead and supporting actresses include Shirley MacLaine, Frances McDormand,
See full article at Gold Derby »

AFI Docs Unveils 2018 Lineup: ‘Personal Statement’ to Open Festival

AFI Docs Unveils 2018 Lineup: ‘Personal Statement’ to Open Festival
Washington — AFI Docs has unveiled the lineup for this year’s festival, which kicks off with the world premiere of “Personal Statement.”

The fest — held from June 13 to June 17 in Washington and Silver Spring, Md. — will include five world premieres and feature 92 films representing 22 countries.

“Personal Statement,” directed by Juliane Dressner and Edwin Martinez, is about three high school seniors in Brooklyn who take it upon themselves to become college counselors in their schools in their determination to earn a higher education.

United Skates,” about the fight to save roller skating rinks — a staple of African American culture — will close the festival.

The centerpiece screening will be Rory Kennedy’s “Above and Beyond: Nasa’s Journey to Tomorrow.” It tells the story about the workforce of Nasa in its exploration of the solar system and of Earth.

“While this
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Lean on Pete’ and ‘The Rider’: Two Bold Westerns Show What Foreign-Born Directors Can Bring to the Genre

‘Lean on Pete’ and ‘The Rider’: Two Bold Westerns Show What Foreign-Born Directors Can Bring to the Genre
The best Westerns often come from outsiders. Fred Zinnemann’s Oscar-winner “High Noon,” Fritz Lang’s “Rancho Notorious,” William Wyler’s “The Big Country,” Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas” — all from Germans and Austrians. And of course, Sergio Leone’s classics starring Clint Eastwood were filmed by an Italian in Spain.

Now we can add U.K. filmmaker Andrew Haigh and China-born Chloé Zhao to their number. Neither set out to comment on classic western genre tropes with “Lean on Pete” (A24) and “The Rider” (Sony Pictures Classics), both of which earned raves on the festival circuit before hitting theaters this month. They shot in the badlands of Colorado and South Dakota, respectively. And both filmmakers explore the relationship between young men, their horses, and the nature that surrounds them. (Their distributors are slowly rolling them out across the heartland.)

The Rider

New Yorker Zhao shot her 2013 documentary “Songs My Brothers Taught Me” in South Dakota.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Lean on Pete’ and ‘The Rider’: Two Bold Westerns Show What Foreign-Born Directors Can Bring to the Genre

‘Lean on Pete’ and ‘The Rider’: Two Bold Westerns Show What Foreign-Born Directors Can Bring to the Genre
The best Westerns often come from outsiders. Fred Zinnemann’s Oscar-winner “High Noon,” Fritz Lang’s “Rancho Notorious,” William Wyler’s “The Big Country,” Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas” — all from Germans and Austrians. And of course, Sergio Leone’s classics starring Clint Eastwood were filmed by an Italian in Spain.

Now we can add U.K. filmmaker Andrew Haigh and China-born Chloé Zhao to their number. Neither set out to comment on classic western genre tropes with “Lean on Pete” (A24) and “The Rider” (Sony Pictures Classics), both of which earned raves on the festival circuit before hitting theaters this month. They shot in the badlands of Colorado and South Dakota, respectively. And both filmmakers explore the relationship between young men, their horses, and the nature that surrounds them. (Their distributors are slowly rolling them out across the heartland.)

The Rider

New Yorker Zhao shot her 2013 documentary “Songs My Brothers Taught Me” in South Dakota.
See full article at Indiewire »

Steven Spielberg movies: Every film from ‘Ready Player One’ director ranked from worst to best

Steven Spielberg movies: Every film from ‘Ready Player One’ director ranked from worst to best
A man-eating shark. A friendly alien. An adventurous archeologist. A ragtag WWII platoon. A heroic German businessman in the Holocaust. The eclectic career of director Steven Spielberg has virtually defined what a blockbuster could be in the past four decades, but he’s also been able to craft more personal films as well. His 31st directorial achievement, the upcoming “Ready Player One,” opens this Thursday, March 29. In recognition of this new movie, we are ranking Spielberg’s entire filmography from worst to best in a new photo gallery above of his 30 prior theatrical features (therefore, not including the TV movie “Duel”).

Based on Ernest Cline‘s bestselling book, “Ready Player One” imagines a future where the creator of a virtual reality world called Oasis challenges his users to find an Easter Egg which will give the recipient a vast fortune. It’s a return to the kind of rollicking entertainments
See full article at Gold Derby »

Steven Spielberg movies: Every film ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Steven Spielberg movies: Every film ranked from worst to best
A man-eating shark. A friendly alien. An adventurous archeologist. A ragtag WWII platoon. A heroic German businessman in the Holocaust. The eclectic career of director Steven Spielberg has virtually defined what a blockbuster could be in the past four decades, but he’s also been able to craft more personal films as well. His 31st directorial achievement, the upcoming “Ready Player One,” opens this Thursday, March 29. In recognition of this new movie, we are ranking Spielberg’s entire filmography from worst to best in a new photo gallery above of his 30 prior theatrical features (therefore, not including the TV movie “Duel”).

Based on Ernest Cline‘s bestselling book, “Ready Player One” imagines a future where the creator of a virtual reality world called Oasis challenges his users to find an Easter Egg which will give the recipient a vast fortune. It’s a return to the kind of rollicking entertainments
See full article at Gold Derby »

Where do the most recent group of Academy Award winners rank all time?

As we begin to fully focus on 2018 releases and eventually what the 2019 awards season will be like, a little more about the most recent Oscars is still required. Mainly, a look at how the winners stack up with previous ones. This time around, I’m tying in all of the major categories together. Yes, all eight of the top prizes will get a rundown today, with the possibility of another piece next week on the technical categories. For now, it’s Picture, Director, the four Acting slots, and both Screenplay categories, which is more than enough to start with. This is going to be fun. Like I mentioned above, before we get to Best Picture, which is clearly the big one, quickly I’d like to run down some of the other categories and how they stack up. That way, it’s more of a broader collection. Obviously, we know
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

The Best Movies to Ever Win the Oscar for Best Picture — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the best movie to ever win the Academy Award for Best Picture?

Joshua Rothkopf (@joshrothkopf), Time Out New York

This one’s hard for me to answer, because for every “Godfather” or “Amadeus,” there’s an overlooked “Aguirre, the Wrath of God” or “Once Upon a Time in America.” So I’ll take your question to mean: What’s the most awe-inspiring Best Picture win? And for me, that’s got to be Kathryn Bigelow’s landmark win with “The Hurt Locker,” beating “Avatar,” the highest-grossing movie in Hollywood history (which was made by her ex-husband, who she also defeated for Best Director,
See full article at Indiewire »

Five Classic Best Picture Winners You Can Watch Right Now on FilmStruck

Oscar fever is in full effect, and before you watch this year’s Academy Awards, FilmStruck has a great opportunity for you to study some Oscar history with classic Best Picture titles.

Thanks to Filmstruck’s new partnership with Warner Bros. Digital Networks and TCM Select, the streaming service has added dozens of classic films to its catalog — meaning you can catch up on Oscar winners of years past any time you wish. The service’s vast back catalog now includes some of the most iconic films from the Golden Age of Hollywood — including five classic Best Picture winners that paved the way for modern winners.

They range from some of the most iconic films in Hollywood history (“Casablanca” and “On the Waterfront”) to the not-quite-as-ubiquitous (“The Best Years of Our Lives”). Check out five classic Best Picture winners from the 1940s and ’50s — smack in the middle of Hollywood
See full article at Indiewire »

Honorary Oscars: A look back at 90 years, from Charlie Chaplin to Bob Hope to Donald Sutherland

Honorary Oscars: A look back at 90 years, from Charlie Chaplin to Bob Hope to Donald Sutherland
Over the decades, special or honorary Oscars have gone to everything from a film series to animated shorts to innovators to a ventriloquist to child performers to foreign films. Tour our photo galleries for a look back featuring every performer honored (above) and every non-performer honored (below).

Two special awards were handed out at the first Academy Awards on May 16, 1929:

Charlie Chaplin, who had originally been nominated for lead actor and for comedy direction for his 1928 masterpiece “The Circus,” was withdrawn from those nominations when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences’ Board of Governors gave him a special award for his “versatility in writing, acting, directing and producing” the comedy.

Warner Brothers also picked up a special honorary for producing 1927’s “The Jazz Singer”-“the pioneer outstanding talking picture, which has revolutionized the industry”.

Now called honorary Oscars, Donald Sutherland, cinematographer Owen Roizman (“The French Connection,” “The Exorcist
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Best Director gallery: All 89 winners from Damien Chazelle to Frank Borzage & Lewis Milestone

Oscar Best Director gallery: All 89 winners from Damien Chazelle to Frank Borzage & Lewis Milestone
All five of this year’s nominees for Best Director are looking for their first Oscar win. The lucky recipient will join the illustrious list of 69 filmmakers that have won in this category since the first Oscars were handed out in May of 1929. We have compiled the definitive gallery of every Best Director winner in the 89-year history of the Academy Awards, from the first year — which had two recipients — to reigning champ Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”). Click through our detailed Best Director photo gallery above.

At the inaugural Oscar ceremony, two directors were honored– one for comedy (Lewis Milestone for “Two Arabian Nights”) and one for drama (Frank Borzage for “7th Heaven”); the practice was discontinued after the first year. On four occasions, a single director has scored multiple nominations in a single year, the most recent being Steven Soderbergh, who earned noms in 2000 for “Erin Brockovich” and “Traffic,
See full article at Gold Derby »

NYC Weekend Watch: Michelangelo Antonioni, Roman Hollywood, Studio Ghibli and More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

An all-inclusive Michelangelo Antonioni retrospective has kicked off.

Metrograph

“Goth(ic)” continues with an all-timer of a weekend.

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg screens on Friday.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

“The Non-Actor” has its final weekend.

Museum of the Moving Image

Rialto retrospective continues with the likes of Hiroshima, mon amour and Rififi.
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: Goth(ic), Maurice Pialat, William Wyler & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Lynch, Hitchcock, Bride of Frankenstein and more come together in “Goth(ic).”

Letter from an Unknown Woman and The Umbrellas of Cherbourg also screen.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

Rossellini, Murnau, Warhol, Pialat and more screen as part of “The Non-Actor.”

Film Forum

The Passion of Joan of Arc has its final days

One of Murnau’s greatest films,
See full article at The Film Stage »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel This December

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This December will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Friday, December 1

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World*: Criterion Collection Edition #692

Stanley Kramer followed his harrowing Oscar winner Judgment at Nuremberg with the most grandly harebrained movie ever made, a pileup of slapstick and borscht-belt-y one-liners about a group of strangers fighting tooth and nail over buried treasure. Performed by a nonpareil cast, including Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Ethel Merman, Mickey Rooney, Spencer Tracy, Jonathan Winters, and a boatload of other playing-to-the-rafters comedy legends, Kramer’s wildly uncharacteristic film is an exhilarating epic of tomfoolery. Supplemental Features: an audio commentary featuring It’s a Mad,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Military-Themed Projects Aim to Raise Empathy for American Vets

Military-Themed Projects Aim to Raise Empathy for American Vets
Even before “Wings” won the first Academy Award for best picture in 1929, stories about soldiers and the military were already a staple of the big screen. Nearly ninety years later, the circumstances of their service have changed, but the nobility of their sacrifice endures, inspiring film and television storytellers alike to continue to pay them tribute with complex, rousing tales of heroism on and off the battlefield.

Spurred by patriotism and the promise of a window into the daily lives of soldiers, audiences have readily embraced military-themed films and shows, from “Band of Brothers” to “American Sniper” to last year’s “Hacksaw Ridge.” But an upcoming wave of projects offers filmmakers the opportunity — and responsibility — to explore the lives of United States veterans more authentically than ever before, drawing upon firsthand accounts from real-life heroes to both do justice and lend credulity to stories both fictional and fact-based without succumbing to jingoistic clichés.

Making his directorial
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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