Woodrow Wilson (I) - News Poster

News

Virginia Resident Wants to Remove Confederate Statue and Replace It — with a Statue of Missy Elliott!

Virginia Resident Wants to Remove Confederate Statue and Replace It — with a Statue of Missy Elliott!
What’s the opposite of a Confederate monument? A statue of Missy “Misdemeanor” Elliott.

A man from Virginia has started a petition calling for the removal of a monument in the Olde Town area of Portsmouth and in its place, he has suggested putting one up of the rap legend — who just so happens to be from the area.

Nathan Coflin writes in his Change.org petition, “Who better to encapsulate the culture and spirit of the city enshrined in a new monument than Grammy Award winning rapper, dancer, and record producer Missy ‘Misdemeanor’ Elliott?”

Elliott, 46, was born in Portsmouth
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Remembering the Woman Behind Mother’s Day: Anna Jarvis

Remembering the Woman Behind Mother’s Day: Anna Jarvis
Few people had as complicated a relationship with Mother’s Day as Anna Jarvis did with the holiday.

Despite her tireless campaign to get the holiday recognized by the United States government, Jarvis ended up denouncing the institution she created, bankrupting herself as she fought against its perceived commercialization. How did that happen?

The roots of Mother’s Day — at least Jarvis’s involvement — date back to the 1850s. Her mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, organized work clubs of mothers in their home state of West Virginia for a variety of causes. When the Civil War broke out, Jarvis senior shifted
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Edgar Allen Poe: Buried Alive Screens Thursday Night at Webster University

Edgar Allen Poe: Buried Alive screens Thursday March 9th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). The movie starts at 7:30. Director Eric Stange, a visiting fellow with the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, will answer questions following the screening. This is a Free event!

Far more than a biography, Edgar Allen Poe: Buried Alive employs a variety of tools to create a narrative that is both visually stunning and deeply engaging. Drawn on the rich palette of Poe’s evocative imagery and sharply drawn plots to help bring new understanding to his life, his place in American art and history, and the iconic position he holds in popular culture around the world. This film has received a production grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and will be broadcast on the acclaimed PBS arts and culture series American Masters.

Tony-award-winning actor Denis O’Hare portrays
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Steve Bannon Rips ‘Opposition Party’ Media at Cpac: ‘It’s Always Wrong’ (Video)

  • The Wrap
Steve Bannon Rips ‘Opposition Party’ Media at Cpac: ‘It’s Always Wrong’ (Video)
White House chief strategist Steve Bannon mocked the media for how it “portrayed the campaign, how they portrayed the transition and now they’re portraying the administration,” saying, “it’s “always wrong,” during a speaking engagement at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Thursday. Bannon, who rarely speaks publicly, joined White House chief of staff Reince Priebus at Cpac for a panel discussion and called President Trump “the greatest public speaker” since William Jennings Bryan, who was Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson from 1913-1915. Bannon pointed to the press assembled in the room and referred to them as the “opposition party,
See full article at The Wrap »

Robert Vaughn, Suave 'Man From U.N.C.L.E.,' Is Dead at 83

Robert Vaughn, Suave 'Man From U.N.C.L.E.,' Is Dead at 83
New York -- Robert Vaughn, the debonair, Oscar-nominated actor whose many film roles were eclipsed by his hugely popular turn in television’s The Man From U.N.C.L.E., has died. He was 83.

Vaughn died Friday morning after a brief battle with acute leukemia, according to his manager, Matthew Sullivan.

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. was an immediate hit, particularly with young people, when it debuted on NBC 1964. It was part of an avalanche of secret agent shows (I Spy, Mission: Impossible, Secret Agent), spoofs (Get Smart), books (The Spy Who Came in From the Cold) and even songs (Secret Agent Man) inspired by the James Bond films.

Vaughn’s urbane superspy Napoleon Solo teamed with Scottish actor David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin, a soft-spoken, Russian-born agent.

Photos: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

The pair, who had put aside Cold War differences for a greater good, worked together each week for the mysterious U.N.C.L.E. (United
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83.

Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast.

The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons.

It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83.

Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast.

The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons.

It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum. Vaughn
See full article at Variety - TV News »

How Armistice Day Became Veterans Day, and Who Helped Make That Happen

November 11 is Veterans Day, but it hasn’t always been. Our current conception of the day was the work of a few dedicated individuals, many of whom are not known by the general public. So let’s dive into how the holiday came about.

Though the Treaty of Versailles, which officially ended World War I, was signed on June 28, 1919, the Allied nations and Germany actually reached an armistice — or a temporary stop to fighting — on Nov. 11, 1918. (The eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, by the way.)

It was President Woodrow Wilson who proclaimed the date Armistice
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Contenders: Documentaries Offer Timely Takes on Current Events

Contenders: Documentaries Offer Timely Takes on Current Events
As one of the wildest, most unpredictable, and most distressing election seasons in American history finally draws to a close this week, journalists and commentators can be forgiven for barely dragging themselves past the finish line. The endless contretemps between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump developed so quickly, with so many bizarre sudden scandals and shifts of momentum, that it was all but impossible to keep up: When it came to the election, late-night sketches, magazine covers, podcasts, and even TV news segments frequently risked becoming woefully out of date before they could even reach an audience.

Film, for obvious reasons, tends to have a far longer lag time when it comes to dealing with political issues. Yet this year’s crop of documentary contenders, for reasons both intentional and seemingly accidental, have provided more than adequate supplementary viewing for this historic election.

Ava DuVernay’s “13th,” released last month
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Adam Ruins Everything’ Makes the Case That America’s Going to Be Ok

‘Adam Ruins Everything’ Makes the Case That America’s Going to Be Ok
At the “Adam Ruins Everything Election Special” taping earlier this month in Los Angeles, even the warmup jokes had their eyes on politics. As standup comedian Jared Logan primed both the audience and the sound technicians for the ensuing show, he invited the audience to test laugh: “Imagine if Tim Kaine just told a joke.”

After 19 episodes of the truTV show already under their belts, Tuesday night’s special represents the most ambitious “Adam Ruins Everything” project yet: an hour-long examination (and in most cases, refutation) of some of the most commonly held refrains of this election cycle.

Read More: ‘Adam Ruins Everything’ With Research, and Adam Conover Likes It That Way

It’s the culmination of weeks of nationwide touring and refining, all done during the midst of production on this year’s batch of “Adam Ruins Everything” episodes, which have been airing since late August. Conover, along with
See full article at Indiewire »

Adam Conover Ruins the Idea This Presidential Race Is Different in New Election Special

Adam Conover Ruins the Idea This Presidential Race Is Different in New Election Special
There’s no shortage of comedian commentary on this election cycle — all the average American has to do to get their fill is turn on their TV. Samantha Bee on TBS has the righteous anger angle. John Oliver on HBO has the “I’m not mad, I’m disappointed — actually, I’m kind of mad, too” vibe. Seth Meyers does the thorough, daily takedowns of whatever absurd details have come out that day on NBC’s “Late Night.” But don’t sleep on Adam Conover’s “The Adam Ruins Everything Election Special,” which premieres Oct. 25 at 10 p.m. on truTV.

In the special, Conover takes a close look at the idea that this election is somehow different than others: nastier, more despair-inducing, more more. It is different, but not quite for all the reasons we think — we have seen most of this circus before. Conover called Variety up to discuss how.

Where
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Gets Colorized: D.W. Griffith’s Controversial Classic Gets Significant Update

  • Indiewire
‘The Birth of a Nation’ Gets Colorized: D.W. Griffith’s Controversial Classic Gets Significant Update
D.W. Griffith’s 1915 black-and-white classic “The Birth of a Nation” has been colorized. Named one of the hundred best films of all time, this new updated edition, “The Birth Of A Nation: The Colorized Version,” is available in DVD format from Createspace.com, a subsidiary of the Amazon group of companies and features new colorized intertitle cards.

The film follows the lives of the northern Stoneman and southern Cameron families before, during and after the Civil War. When Confederate colonel Ben Cameron (Henry B. Walthall) is captured in battle, nurse Elsie Stoneman (Lillian Gish) petitions for his pardon. Cameron then founds the Ku Klux Klan, which makes him battle Elsie’s congressman father (Ralph Lewis) and his African-American protégé, Silas Lynch (George Siegmann).

Read More: ‘The Birth of a Nation’ Premieres in Toronto, and Audiences Give Nate Parker a Second Chance

“The Birth Of A Nation” was a commercial success upon release,
See full article at Indiewire »

When Barack met Michelle: the presidential biopic as love story

Southside With You is the latest in a long line of presidential biopics. But since it is simply an account of the Obamas’ first date, with little reference to their illustrious future, how will it rate alongside the likes of Young Mr Lincoln and Pt 109?

If Hollywood is to be believed, the most fascinating parts of a life are the rise and the fall — the ascent up the mountain and the inevitable tumble back to sea level. The middle bit — all the stuff about how one copes with the mundane reality of one’s fate — is less travelled territory. Look no further than the superhero origin story. Despite how often moviegoers have seen Batman’s parents gunned down in an alley, no shortage of films and TV shows choose to dramatise it yet again. But long before capes and masks were dominating cinemas, the film industry was giving audiences
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Nate Parker Interview: What’s Next for ‘The Birth of a Nation’

Two weeks ago, Nate Parker was a different man — on the verge of making it on Hollywood’s A-list with his American period drama “The Birth of a Nation.” He strolled into a restaurant in Sherman Oaks, Calif., with his 6-year-old daughter in tow. “My wife just had a baby, so I’m taking the burden off her,” he told a Variety reporter about his fatherly duties. He talked about how his oldest of five daughters is gearing up for her freshman year in college, and how he recently surprised her with a visit to New York to see “Hamilton.” And he seemed most proud of the legacy he was leaving for his children as the director, star, producer, and writer of “The Birth of a Nation,” the Sundance Film Festival darling about the slave revolt of 1831 led by Nat Turner, which sold for a record-shattering $17.5 million to Fox Searchlight.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Childhood of a Leader review – stunning origins story for a future fascist

First-time director Brady Corbet’s story of a privileged, petulant 10-year-old fated to become a fascist dictator exerts a lethal grip

This steely, sinister and utterly gripping movie is the feature debut of 28-year-old actor-turned-director Brady Corbet. It’s an inspired provocation, jabbing its audience with a fictional variant on history, and loosely based on Jean-Paul Sartre’s 1939 short story of the same name. Corbet has co-written the screenplay with his partner, film-maker Mona Fastvold.

The film imagines the wealthy, dysfunctional and unhappy childhood of someone fated to become a fascist leader: the action, disturbing enough in any case, is retroactively charged with this poisonous destiny. Newcomer Tom Sweet plays Prescott, the unhappy 10-year-old son of an American career diplomat (Liam Cunningham), who is in France in 1919 as part of Us president Woodrow Wilson’s retinue, there to establish postwar settlement terms to be imposed at Versailles on the defeated Germans.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Childhood of a Leader: From Jean-Paul Sartre to Robert Pattinson

If actor-turned-director Brady Corbet’s post-World-War-i saga, The Childhood of a Leader, did little more than send American readers to Jean-Paul Sartre’s lesser known short story of the same name, one would be thanking the cinematic gods for its appearance.

The final story in his Sartre’s 1939 collection, The Wall, “The Childhood of a Leader” chronicles the life of Lucien from his rebellious potty training days as a lovely, long-haired tot, son of a rich industrialist, to his transformation into anti-Semitic murderer. There goes Holden Caulfield but for the grace of God.

When we first meet Lucien, with his lustrous blond curls and attired in a blue angel’s costume, he is mistaken by his mother’s consorts as a girl.

“What’s your name? Jacqueline, Lucienne, Margot?”

The embarrassed boy blushes and sets the record right, but “[h]e was no longer quite sure about not being a little
See full article at CultureCatch »

Review: The Childhood Of A Leader, Making of a Monster in Brady Corbet's Accomplished Directorial Debut

An allegorical tale set in the shadow of Wwi Europe, The Childhood of a Leader is a very accomplished first feature from 27 year-old American actor Brady Corbet. Considering his face has been showing up in the films of who's who in European arthouse cinema over the years -- Haneke, von Trier, Bonello, Assayas, Hansen-Løve, just to name a few -- this exclusively European production (UK/Hungary/France) seems far less surprising. The film sees an American diplomat (played by Liam Cunningham) working for President Woodrow Wilson to end the most horrific war that the world has ever experienced. His newly transplanted family consists of an educated, worldly wife (Berenice Bejo, The Artist, The Past) and an effeminate young son (the amazing Tom Sweet), complete with bobcut...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Hillary’s America’ Review: Dinesh D’Souza’s Latest Documentary Is Republican Propaganda At Its Dumbest

‘Hillary’s America’ Review: Dinesh D’Souza’s Latest Documentary Is Republican Propaganda At Its Dumbest
Hillary’s America,” the third documentary from author, filmmaker and convicted felon Dinesh D’Souza, begins with an undeniably fascinating premise: What if a Twitter egg made a movie? While D’Souza’s previous feature-length attacks on the Democratic Party were similarly falsified and foaming at the mouth (remember the part in 2014’s “America” when he argued that Hillary Clinton wants to use Nasa to turn the United States into her own personal panopticon of terror?), “Hillary’s America” is different — this time, it’s personal.

In January of 2014, D’Souza was indicted for violating campaign finance laws after it was discovered that he made illegal contributions to Wendy Long’s Senate bid (she wound up losing by more than 40 percentage points). He was found guilty, and accused the court of selective persecution on the basis that the Obama administration was supposedly trying to silence its dissidents.

“It all began
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: First Trailer for Brady Corbet's Film 'The Childhood of a Leader'

"Witness the birth of a terrifying ego." The first trailer has debuted for a film called The Childhood of a Leader, which is the feature directing debut of the talented actor Brady Corbet, who has appeared in a number of excellent indie films over the last decade. Loosely inspired by the writings of Jean-Paul Sartre and Margaret MacMillan, the film tells a coming-of-age story of a young French choirboy whose father is a diplomat assisting President Woodrow Wilson in the signing of the Treaty of Versailles. Tom Sweet plays the boy, and the cast includes Bérénice Bejo, Liam Cunningham, Stacy Martin, Yolande Moreau and Robert Pattinson. This certainly does look like something we've never seen before. Take a look below. Here's the first official trailer for Brady Corbet's The Childhood of a Leader, direct from YouTube: Independent film mainstay Brady Corbet (Mysterious Skin, Martha Marcy May Marlene) delivers one
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

First Trailer For Brady Corbet’s ‘The Childhood of a Leader’ With Robert Pattinson, Bérénice Bejo & More

He can be seen in films from Michael Haneke, Lars von Trier, Olivier Assayas, Mia Hansen-Løve, Noah Baumbach, Bertrand Bonello, Ruben Östlund, and more, but Brady Corbet finally got on the other side of the camera for his feature debut, The Childhood of a Leader. With a top-notch cast featuring Bérénice Bejo, Liam Cunningham, Stacy Martin, Yolande Moreau, Robert Pattinson, and Tom Sweet, it’s been mostly quiet regarding the post-wwi drama since its Venice premiere last fall, but now a new trailer has landed along with news it’ll play at BAMcinemaFest next month.

We said in our review, “The feature debut from young actor turned screenwriter-director Brady Corbet, The Childhood of a Leader is an ambitious choice for a first project — a period piece tying together the post-wwi political climate and the upbringing of a child in a chateau outside Paris. The film, premiering in the Orizzonti section of the Venice Film Festival,
See full article at The Film Stage »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites