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Tuesday Blus: Spoils to the Victor in Vidor’s Ruby Gentry (1952)

Had Ruby Gentry been penned several years earlier, it would have most likely been swooped up as a star vehicle for Joan Crawford, especially as this screenplay was penned by Silvia Richards, whose script for 1947’s Possessed gave the larger-than-life star one of her three Academy Award nominations. Instead, this luridly tinged tale of backwoods swamp lust serves as a proto-type for the hysterical class issues later sharpened in the theatrical melodrama of Tennessee Williams’ adaptations, and while too tawdry for 1950s sensibilities, this late period King Vidor doesn’t have the same camp value as the ill-fated Beyond the Forest
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Film Review: ‘Krystal’

Film Review: ‘Krystal’
Easily one of his generation’s most gifted character actors, with a hangdog face unforgettable from such films as “Fargo” and “Boogie Nights,” William H. Macy made his feature directing debut some 30 years ago with a savvy TV-news parody called “Lip Service” for HBO. For some reason, it wasn’t until starring in (and eventually directing an episode of) Showtime’s “Shameless” that he picked up the habit again in earnest. The question, now that Macy appears to be stepping behind the camera with some regularity, is what it is about these curious projects that compels him.

Take “Krystal,” a uniquely bizarre, uncomfortably sexist “Pretty Woman”-meets-“Pretty in Pink” hybrid that comes across as if Tennessee Williams had been commissioned to write a John Hughes-style wish-fulfillment fantasy. Though Macy is an odd fit to direct (coming at the talky script like it was a madcap piece of theater), the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Beauty vs Beast: Monkeys to Monoliths

Jason Adams from Mnpp here on the surface of the Moon (aka lower Manhattan covered with farcical April snowflakes) and primed to toss a bone your way with this week's edition of "Beauty vs Beast" which is wishing Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey a happy 50, which it turns today. The film premiered in Washington D.C. on April 2nd 1968 and in New York the following day, and it has probably been running on some stoner's projector every day since. The film was nominated for four Oscars and rightly won for Best Visual Effects - basically every movie that's gone to outer space ever since has been mercilessly ripping it off, just like every movie set in the future post-Blade Runner throws up a neon billboard or twenty. But for all its trippiness it's still at its heart just a "boy and his dog" movie. So what of
See full article at FilmExperience »

Beauty vs Beast: Somebody's Kindness of Strangers

Howdy y'all Jason from Mnpp popping in to clear my throat and let out a rollicking "Stella!!!" in honor of the master Tennessee Williams birth - he was born in the town of Columbus, Mississippi (three hours south of Memphis) on this day in the year 1911, and went on to basically shape the entire Southern United States with his writings; I'd argue he's had more of an effect on our modern view of the sub-Mason-Dixon than maybe anybody but Margaret Mitchell did. And to think a gay man did that!

Anyway for this week's "Beauty vs Beast" let's zoom in on his most famous story, the one about the Streetcar Named Desire that you take to the one called Cemetery that you take to Elysian Fields. And yes that means we're facing down arguably two of the greatest movie performances ever put on screen - Vivien Leigh as Blanche DuBois
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘The Room’ Stars Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero Would Like You to Watch Their Two-Part Movie Inspired By ‘Breaking Bad’

‘The Room’ Stars Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero Would Like You to Watch Their Two-Part Movie Inspired By ‘Breaking Bad’
“Let me stop you right there,” said Tommy Wiseau, the mastermind behind “The Room.” He doesn’t want to think about how his long-awaited moment of Hollywood glory may have been cut short when James Franco faced accusations of sexual misconduct shortly after he accepted a Golden Globe for his performance in “The Disaster Artist.” Nor is he interested in the lawsuit filed by Franco’s former UCLA student, Ryan Moody, over an associate producing credit on the film. “This has nothing to do with us, let’s talk about the topic of positive thinking.”

What followed was an extended lecture on how “respect equals success,” and “negative always creates negative. This is my new thing for 2018.”

And ultimately, “The Disaster Artist” was nothing but positive for Wiseau and his best friend, “The Room” costar Greg Sestero, who said it provided “a great learning experience of what it’s like to make a good film.
See full article at Indiewire »

Sienna Miller Returns to Wme (Exclusive)

Sienna Miller Returns to Wme (Exclusive)
Sienna Miller has returned to Wme after a year at CAA, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned. Wme declined to comment.

The actress starred as the iconic Maggie the Cat in Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof on the West End last year, and a recording of that performance can now be seen in cinemas via National Theatre Live.

Miller will next be seen in the indie thriller The Burning Woman, opposite Christina Hendricks and Aaron Paul. Her recent credits include The Lost City of Z, Live by Night, American Sniper and Foxcatcher.

Miller continues to be repped...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

#ICastIt Casting a Multicultural World for 'A Streetcar Named Desire'

Boasting a truly multicultural cast, Michael Michetti’s “A Streetcar Named Desire” for Boston Court Performing Arts Center brings Tennessee Williams’ classic into the modern world. Casting director Victoria Hoffman came on board after having worked with Michetti previously on “Captain of the Bible Quiz Team” at the Rogue Machine Theatre. Rogue Machine is a membership company so Hoffman typically casts from the membership first, but the multicultural needs for “A Streetcar Named Desire,” gave her the opportunity to meet many actors she was unaware of. “I don’t think it’s possible for any one casting person to know every actor in this town because there’s so many, and so many really gifted ones.” Other than the leading role of Blanche (played byJaimi Paige) the entire cast is made up of actors of color. According to Hoffman, the idea was to have Blanche as the only Caucasian onstage
See full article at Backstage »

Frances McDormand: two defining roles, two decades apart

Her reaction to an Oscar for Fargo suggested a complex attitude towards fame. With Three Billboards, it will be tested again

Winners of the Oscar for best actress can pretty much choose what to do next. But, when Frances McDormand won in 1996 – for her performance as an eccentric but unfoolable Minnesota cop in Fargo – she made choices that surprised Hollywood.

The best thing about the award, she told interviewers, was that she was now famous enough to be cast in a Sesame Street video giving tips to children who got lost. Then, at a point where she could have picked any film, she chose to go to the Gate theatre in Dublin for a revival of Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire. She specifically asked the Gate not to mention her Oscar in the programme.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

National Theatre Live Adds Two Shakespearean Classics, Julius Caesar And MacBeth To Slate Of U.S. Cinema Offerings This Spring

Fathom Events, By Experience and National Theatre Live have a full line-up of top London stage productions set for U.S. cinema audiences in early 2018. Newly added titles include director Nicholas Hytner's Bridge Theatre production of 'Julius Caesar' March 22 and Rory Kinnear's return to the National Theatre stage as the title role in 'Macbeth' May 17. These two titles are in addition to Tennessee Williams' 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof' February 22, captured live from London's West End, and the fastest-selling show in London theatre history -- and most-watched Nt Live broadcast -- 'Hamlet' March 8.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Frances McDormand movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Three Billboards,’ ‘Fargo,’ ‘Almost Famous’

  • Gold Derby
Frances McDormand movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Three Billboards,’ ‘Fargo,’ ‘Almost Famous’
The 2017 film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri” has now placed its star Frances McDormand back on the in-demand list for actresses over a certain age. Long before this comeback, McDormand won the 1996 Best Actress award for her role in “Fargo” and also had supporting nominations for “Mississippi Burning” (1988), “Almost Famous” (2000), and “North Country” (2005). A second Academy Award could be hers on March 4, especially since she has already won at the Golden Globes, SAG Awards, Critics’ Choice and more.

McDormand is also part of an elite group of actors who have won the “Triple Crown of Acting.” That distinction is given to actors who have won all three of the major acting awards given: the Oscar, Emmy and Tony. McDormand won her Emmy for the HBO miniseries “Olive Kitteridge” in 2015. She was also nominated for another Emmy for her supporting role in the TV movie “Hidden in America” in 1997.

SEE2018 Oscars:
See full article at Gold Derby »

Frances McDormand movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Frances McDormand movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
The 2017 film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” placed its star Frances McDormand back on the in-demand list for actresses over a certain age. Long before this comeback, McDormand won the 1996 Best Actress award for her role in “Fargo” and also had supporting nominations for “Mississippi Burning” (1988), “Almost Famous” (2000), and “North Country” (2005).

McDormand is also part of an elite group of actors who have won the “Triple Crown of Acting.” That distinction is given to actors who have won all three of the major acting awards given: the Oscar, Emmy and Tony. McDormand won her Emmy for the HBO miniseries “Olive Kitteridge” in 2015. She was also nominated for another Emmy for her supporting role in the TV movie “Hidden in America” in 1997.

Her Tony award came for her work on Broadway in the play “Good People” in 2011 for Best Actress in a Play. She had previous been nominated in that same
See full article at Gold Derby »

Making of 'Three Billboards': How a Haunting Greyhound Bus Trip Inspired the Dark Revenge Comedy

Making of 'Three Billboards': How a Haunting Greyhound Bus Trip Inspired the Dark Revenge Comedy
Martin McDonagh was on a Greyhound bus somewhere in the South — it was 20 years ago, he can't remember exactly where — when he spotted something on the side of the road that has haunted him ever since.

He was a 27-year-old playwright at the time, making his first marks on the London stage, and had decided to go on an exploratory journey into the American heartland so that he could soak up some of the culture he'd read about in the works of William Faulkner and Tennessee Williams. But as his bus rolled along a stretch of rural...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Movie Review – Blame (2017)

Blame, 2017.

Written and Directed by Quinn Shephard.

Starring Quinn Shephard, Chris Messina, Nadia Alexander, and Tate Donovan.

Synopsis:

Tensions rise when a substitute teacher changes the class play to The Crucible.

Early in Blame we meet Abigail (Quinn Shephard), combing her hair in a mirror, the back of her head blocking us from seeing her reflection. Later her drama teacher, Mr. Woods’, girlfriend (Trieste Kelly Dunn), is introduced in a similar way, a head of hair from behind, like their faces could be exchanged, and no one would be the wiser. When Mr. Woods (Chris Messina) and Abigail rehearse the scene they’re working on, it’s the line, “Can you see my face?” that’s given special attention.

Does Blame blur the lines of a student-teacher relationship? Mr. Woods change the class play from Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie to Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. If you know your drama,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Voice's Final Four Look Ahead to the Season 13 Finale – How They're Gearing Up for the Big Night

The Voice's Final Four Look Ahead to the Season 13 Finale – How They're Gearing Up for the Big Night
The Voice’s final four — Chloe Kohanski, Addison Agen, Brooke Simpson and Red Marlow — are one step closer to finding out who will be crowned the winner of season 13.

But before the results are announced on Tuesday, the finalists will take the stage during the star-studded finale to perform with their idols.

After the live show on Monday, the contestants looked back on their journey throughout the competition and revealed how they’re gearing up for the big night.

Chloe Kohanski — Team Blake

It’s no surprise that the Voice’s resident queen of ’80s and ’90s rock songs stayed
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Room’s Tommy Wiseau would like to make a Star Wars movie

Notoriously bad actor-director Tommy Wiseau, who rose to fame in cult ‘so bad, it’s good’ movie The Room, has said he would like to make a Star Wars film.

The mysterious filmmaker told his Twitter followers he would “absolutely” like to direct a Star Wars movie, but added he would “prefer to act” in one if given the opportunity.

He then issued a direct offer to Lucasfilm and producer Kathleen Kennedy to contact him, in the sort of astounding display of self-confidence that is typical of Tommy Wiseau.

Yes! Absolutely! but I am very busy, so I would prefer to act.#StarWars can contact me -> https://t.co/tQUEyFfJOW https://t.co/96aoGEIyo9

Tommy Wiseau (@TommyWiseau) December 5, 2017

Wiseau released The Room in 2003, having spent six million dollars of his own money to make the movie, which was conceived as a weighty drama at the level of Tennessee Williams.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Johnny Hallyday, the Elvis of France, Dead at Age 74

  • PEOPLE.com
Johnny Hallyday, the Elvis of France, Dead at Age 74
French rock idol Johnny Hallyday, remembered as the nation’s answer to Elvis Presley in the 1960s, has died at age 74.

The legendary singer died from lung cancer, his family confirmed.

Johnny Hallyday has left us,” Hallyday’s wife, Laeticia, said in a statement to The Guardian. “I write these words without believing them. But yet, it’s true. My man is no longer with us. He left us tonight as he lived his whole life, with courage and dignity.”

Beginning in 1960, Hallyday was the heartbeat of Gallic rock n’ roll, becoming its best known and best-selling artist for nearly six decades.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ Was a First Stop for Many Top Stars

‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ Was a First Stop for Many Top Stars
Variety declared “A Streetcar Named Desire,” which opened Dec. 3, 1947, “a smash success.” That was an understatement. The Tennessee Williams play became a hit on Broadway, on the road, and in its 1951 film adaptation; it won the Pulitzer and became a staple of American theater, making the characters Stanley Kowalski and Blanche DuBois synonymous with sexy brutes and high-strung, fragile women, respectively. The then-shocking production confirmed the talents of Williams, after his 1944 “The Glass Menagerie,” and of director Elia Kazan, whose film “Gentleman’s Agreement” won best picture and director. “Streetcar” made a star of Marlon Brando, cast after John Garfield turned down the part. Jessica Tandy won a Tony as Blanche, and there was high praise for Karl Malden and Kim Hunter. A few weeks after the opening, Variety columnist Radie Harris said Irene Selznick had become “the most talked about producer on Broadway, male or female.”

Director Kazan was given a record 20% of the profits, in addition
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Wonder Wheel’ Film Review: Woody Allen Takes ‘Streetcar’ Again, to Diminished Effect

  • The Wrap
‘Wonder Wheel’ Film Review: Woody Allen Takes ‘Streetcar’ Again, to Diminished Effect
Woody Allen seems increasingly haunted by the Tennessee Williams play “A Streetcar Named Desire.” The basic situation of that Williams classic was reused for Allen’s “Blue Jasmine,” which won Cate Blanchett an Oscar, and it is repurposed again (but somewhat transposed) for “Wonder Wheel,” a film about a frustrated woman in 1950s Coney Island named Ginny (Kate Winslet). Allen was often at his best in earlier films when he dealt with the character of a failed creative person, like Dianne Wiest’s Holly in “Hannah and Her Sisters,” but his sympathy for people like that has dried up over time.
See full article at The Wrap »

The Insane True Story Behind The Room, the Best Bad Movie Ever

  • BuzzSugar
The Room's Tommy Wiseau, left, and Greg Sestero with Hollywood producer Katherine Kramer in 2004. In 2003, a true contender for the greatest bad movie of all time premiered in Los Angeles. That movie was The Room, directed by Tommy Wiseau, a man with a thick Eastern European accent who insists he's from New Orleans on the rare occasions he's willing to talk about his life. He's also the man who wrote, produced, and starred in the masterpiece of awfulness. The making of The Room is a story that's almost as bizarre as the movie itself, but it's one that inspired James Franco to immortalize the film in his new movie The Disaster Artist, based on the book of the same name by Wiseau's friend and The Room costar Greg Sestero. There's no better place to begin than with the film's plot, even though explaining it is almost impossible. It all
See full article at BuzzSugar »

6 Things You Need to Know About The Room Director Tommy Wiseau

  • BuzzSugar
Cult classic The Room is considered by its fans to be the best bad movie of all time, but while the film leaves no bizarre stone unturned, the film's director is cloaked in mystery. And that's exactly the way he wants it. Who is Tommy Wiseau? The Room's director is an enigma wrapped in colorful vests and statement sunglasses. In interviews, Wiseau purposefully dodges personal questions or offers only the vaguest of answers. He wants the focus to be on his work, The Room - the making of which is the basis for James Franco's new film The Disaster Artist. Despite Wiseau's attempts to keep everything a secret, from his country of origin to how he ponied up $6 million to fund his pet project, a few details about the director's life have been revealed. The answers available are thanks in large part to documentarian Rick Harper. Harper went
See full article at BuzzSugar »
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