Kenneth Williams (I) - News Poster

News

End of empire: why Bollywood needs to grasp India's story

Seven decades after independence, Indian cinema is still struggling to depict the Raj, leaving its screen depictions – from Gandhi to colonial racism – to be viewed almost solely through British eyes

In 1968, 20 years after Indian independence and partition, producer-director duo Peter Rogers and Gerald Thomas released Carry On Up the Khyber in British cinemas. It was a raunchy, imperialistic romp, set against the backdrop of the Raj – the British colonial rule in India that lasted till 1947.

Looking back, the Carry On humour hasn’t dated well. Not only is the sexist slap-and-tickle at odds with modern sensibilities but the film is awash with casual racism. Bernard Bresslaw and Kenneth Williams “brown-up” to play the not-so-hilariously named Bungdit Din and the Khasi of Khalabar, while Sidney James yak-yak-yaks away with his lustful eyes fixed on buxom Brits dressed in saris.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Carry On’ Comedy Movie Franchise to Be Revived (Exclusive)

‘Carry On’ Comedy Movie Franchise to Be Revived (Exclusive)
Hereford FilmsJonathan Sothcott, alongside Carry On Films, is to produce a slate of brand new “Carry On” films, started with “Carry On Doctors,” which will be written by Tim Dawson and Susan Nickson, the writers of hit BBC sitcom “Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps.”

Carry On Doctors” is the first of a slate of “Carry On” films planned by Hereford Films, with the second instalment titled “Carry On Campus.” The films will be executive produced by Brian Baker of Carry On Films, owner of the rights to the new “Carry On” pics.

The original “Carry On” franchise is the most successful British comedy film series of all time. It ran from 1958-92, encompassing 31 movies, all on low-budgets. The films, produced by Peter Rogers, were known for their double entendre and outlandish plots, and became an institution in the U.K., where they are still regularly shown on TV.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Castle Recap: Live. Die. Repeat.

Castle Recap: Live. Die. Repeat.
In a bid to be, like, 50 percent more objective than I was last week, and as fresh as The News still feels… this Monday’s Castle was quite entertaining, helped by some perfect guest casting.

RelatedCastle’s Nathan Fillion Breaks Silence on Stana Katic’s Exit

As Alan Masters, sitcom vet Jonathan Silverman was the perfect hapless Everyman, a mild-mannered safety inspector whose mundane job exposed him to some highly illegal goings-on.

At first, Alan was poisoned, but that didn’t take. Then he was electrocuted and presumed dead a second time.. only to wake up shortly after that attack.
See full article at TVLine.com »

50 years of Jackanory: what the TV show gave to me and other authors

On the 50th anniversary of Jackanory, Frank Cottrell Boyce on the massive impact of listening to Rik Mayall, Kenneth Williams and others read out loud on TV

• Discover more great stories on the children’s books website

Long, long ago, when the world wasn’t digital and there were only three channels on TV, there was a show called Jackanory. It seemed a simple little show - a grown-up sat in a peacock chair and read a story straight off the autocue, into the camera.

But when I mentioned to Twitter that it was the 50th anniversary of that show, my timeline glowed with nostalgia. “School often made me anxious,” said @L_BuckleyArcher, “snuggling up with marmite on toast and Jackanory made me feel safe and happy.” @Nicolakidsbooks said just hearing the theme tune made was enough to make her purr.

Related: Frank Cottrell Boyce: there’s nothing unusual
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Interviews: Gold to air comedian biography show with a difference

Gold has ordered a new biography series about comedians - with a difference.

The Interviews - a six part series - will focus on a different star in each episode by using their appearances on British chat shows.

Kenneth Williams, The Two Ronnies, Les Dawson, Oliver Reed, Spike Milligan, Peter Cook and Dudley Moore will each feature in an instalment of The Interviews, with Dawn French providing a voiceover for the series.

As well as using footage with interviewers such as Michael Parkinson, Terry Wogan, Melvyn Bragg, Jonathan Ross, Graham Norton, Michael Aspel, Des O'Connor and Mavis Nicholson, the series will use clips from personal documentary interviews and radio specials.

Gold's commissioning editor Iain Coyle described the series as a "compelling show that perfectly captures the personalities of our comedy legends".

"The Interviews is a unique way of doing biography through chat show appearances, as the guests' stories are told straight from the horse's mouth,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Bill Kerr obituary

Australian actor and comedian who played Tony Hancock's good-natured lodger on radio and appeared in films such as The Dam Busters and Gallipoli

The actor and comedian Bill Kerr, who has died aged 92, was a master of laconic understatement. Having begun his British variety career in the late 1940s as "the boy from Wagga Wagga", he became a household name as a perfect foil for Tony Hancock in six series of the wildly popular BBC radio show Hancock's Half Hour (1954-59).

Playing Hancock's breezy and good-hearted Australian lodger, Kerr was often given the best lines by writers Ray Galton and Alan Simpson because of his deadpan delivery. His main function was to relentlessly encourage Hancock's grandiose schemes, subsequently exploited by Sid James, only to be thwarted by the voice of officialdom (usually Kenneth Williams), or to suggest ludicrous ventures of his own, immediately pounced upon by the gullible Hancock: "You know,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bernard Cribbins: 'I made Noël Coward's favourite record'

No one tells a story like Bernard Cribbins. Simon Hattenstone settles down to listen to the former paratrooper, pop star and Womble talk about his epic career and never having children of his own

Bernard Cribbins is completing the Telegraph crossword when I arrive. He looks up. "What bloody time d'you call this?" I apologise. He grins. He knows the trains have been delayed at Waterloo. "Six down, enzyme, must be. Bobobobobom, bobobobobom," he sings, to no recognisable tune. It's a brute of a summer's day, and Cribbins' pink shirt is sweat-patched, and there's a rivulet dripping from his forehead. He has a full head of white hair, a beard like brambles and a crippling handshake.

He is 85 now and industrious as ever. This week, appropriately enough, he stars in the first CBeebies Prom as Old Jack, eponymous hero of the BBC show Old Jack's Boat. Appropriate because no
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Easter TV Movie Guide: Saturday, April 19 - Speed, Taken, Iron Man

Carry On Cruising - 11.35am, ITV3

This Easter Saturday, be treated to a marathon of Carry On... films from 9.40am to 5.05pm. This charming offering sees the same cast of Sid James, Kenneth Williams and the rest, aboard the SS Happy Wanderer, staffed by a bunch of willing but inept newcomers.

Shrek Forever After - 5.15pm, BBC One

Surely the final instalment in the Shrek franchise, which began with such promise and is now gradually eked out to an adequate conclusion. Shrek (Mike Myers) makes an ill-fated deal with Rumpelstiltskin and is transported to an alternate universe where ogres are enslaved.

Iron Man - 6.40pm, Film 4

Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr) makes witty jokes and uses his billions to create the superhero Iron Man, then faces off against a hostile colleague in a smash-bang Transformers-esque finale.

Taken - 9pm, Channel 4

Bryan Mills (Liam Neeson), an ex-cia operative, has exactly
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Easter TV Movie Guide: Saturday, April 19 - Speed, Taken, Iron Man

Easter TV Movie Guide: Saturday, April 19 - Speed, Taken, Iron Man
Carry On Cruising - 11.35am, ITV3

This Easter Saturday, be treated to a marathon of Carry On... films from 9.40am to 5.05pm. This charming offering sees the same cast of Sid James, Kenneth Williams and the rest, aboard the SS Happy Wanderer, staffed by a bunch of willing but inept newcomers.

Shrek Forever After - 5.15pm, BBC One

Surely the final instalment in the Shrek franchise, which began with such promise and is now gradually eked out to an adequate conclusion. Shrek (Mike Myers) makes an ill-fated deal with Rumpelstiltskin and is transported to an alternate universe where ogres are enslaved.

Iron Man - 6.40pm, Film 4

Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr) makes witty jokes and uses his billions to create the superhero Iron Man, then faces off against a hostile colleague in a smash-bang Transformers-esque finale.

Taken - 9pm, Channel 4

Bryan Mills (Liam Neeson), an ex-cia operative, has exactly
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Doctor Who: the film careers of William Hartnell & Jon Pertwee

Feature Alex Westthorp 28 Mar 2014 - 07:00

In a new series, Alex talks us through the film roles of the actors who've played the Doctor. First up, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee...

We know them best as the twelve very different incarnations of the Doctor. But all the actors who've been the star of Doctor Who, being such good all-rounders in the first place, have also had film careers. Admittedly, some CVs are more impressive than others, but this retrospective attempts to pick out some of the many worthwhile films which have starred, featured or seen a fleeting cameo by the actors who would become (or had been) the Doctor.

William Hartnell was, above all else, a film star. He is by far the most prolific film actor of the main twelve to play the Time Lord. With over 70 films to his name, summarising Hartnell's film career is difficult at best.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Take a deep breath: the stethoscope is dying

That cultural symbol of medics – from Kenneth Williams in Carry On Doctor to Edie Falcon's Nurse Jackie – is being replaced by cheaper and more accurate ultrasound devices

If you Google "Hugh Laurie" and "stethoscope", you will come up with a clutch of stories from February 2012 about how everybody's favourite pill-popping misanthropic physician is "hanging up his stethoscope" after eight seasons on the hit show House.

This underlines a more general truth: doctors don't retire, they hang up their stethoscopes. Is there any profession so proverbially connected to one tool of their trade? Will people believe you are a doctor if you don't wear one?

These questions become topical because the stethoscope is reportedly becoming obsolete, nearly 200 years after it was invented. Is it anything to do with the finding that a third of Us stethoscopes used in emergencies were contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (Mrsa) bacteria? No, but it probably didn't help.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Legendary, Troubled Animated Film Nearly Three Decades in the Making Gets Academy Premiere

‘The Thief and the Cobbler’: Original version of Richard Williams’ animated film has first public screening at the Academy The first public screening of the original version of Richard Williams’ The Thief and the Cobbler will be held at the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences’ Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 10, 2013. Williams will be in attendance to introduce the recently reconstructed original workprint from 1992. The Thief and the Cobbler will be accompanied by Richard Williams’s 1972 Oscar-winning animated short A Christmas Carol, adapted from Charles Dickens’ 1843 novella. Featuring animation by Ken Harris and Abe Levitow, among others, A Christmas Carol has, according to the Academy’s website, "a distinctive and dark tone" inspired by John Leech’s engraved illustrations of the Dickens’ tale. In conjunction with the screenings, the Academy’s public exhibition “Richard Williams: Master of Animation,” featuring film clips,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Bill Pertwee obituary

Actor best known for playing the officious Arp warden William Hodges in Dad's Army

In his early days as a cabaret artist, the actor Bill Pertwee, who has died aged 86, did a manic cricket revue sketch at a fashionable club in central London. A haughty and inebriated diner kicked over his stumps and shouted: "How's that?" Pertwee punched him in the stomach and was escorted out by the head waiter, who informed him that the customer was always right. "As far as I'm concerned, he isn't!" retorted Pertwee.

This bubbling belligerence was successfully incorporated into the bossy character that made Pertwee famous: Arp Warden William Hodges in the celebrated BBC television series Dad's Army (1968-77), written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft. As Hodges, he perpetually clashed with Captain George Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) of the Home Guard.

The inspiration for the way Pertwee played the warden came from his boyhood during the second world war,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bill Pertwee obituary

Actor best known for playing the officious Arp warden William Hodges in Dad's Army

In his early days as a cabaret artist, the actor Bill Pertwee, who has died aged 86, did a manic cricket revue sketch at a fashionable club in central London. A haughty and inebriated diner kicked over his stumps and shouted: "How's that?" Pertwee punched him in the stomach and was escorted out by the head waiter, who informed him that the customer was always right. "As far as I'm concerned, he isn't!" retorted Pertwee.

This bubbling belligerence was successfully incorporated into the bossy character that made Pertwee famous: Arp Warden William Hodges in the celebrated BBC television series Dad's Army (1968-77), written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft. As Hodges, he perpetually clashed with Captain George Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) of the Home Guard.

The inspiration for the way Pertwee played the warden came from his boyhood during the second world war,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Brighton's Palace Pier withdrawn from sale by owners

Pier, which appears in films including Brighton Rock and Quadrophenia, is taken off market by Noble Organisation

One of the most famous landmarks on the south coast, Brighton's Palace Pier, known to millions across the world from its many guest appearances in films, has been taken off the market by its owners.

The Noble Organisation, which has owned the pier since 1984, put it up for sale last year for an undisclosed guide price, but now says it forms part of the group's long-term plans.

A statement from the company denied that lack of offers in the throes of the recession and diabolical summer weather were to blame. "Last year's marketing exercise generated a great deal of interest in the pier and a number of substantial offers. However, a change in strategy led us to conclude that the pier will now form part of our longer-term group plans."

The Grade II
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Vanished Years by Rupert Everett – review

Rupert Everett returns to dish the dirt in his second fearless and witty account of life with the A-list crowd

As sexist old Samuel Johnson said of a woman preaching, when an actor writes a book "it is not well done, but you are surprised to find it done at all". These are adults who spend their whole lives raiding dressing up boxes and speaking the words of others for a living, after all. Rupert Everett, like Richard E Grant and Kathy Burke, is the exception that proves the rule; he really can write, as his 2006 bestseller Red Carpets and Other Banana Skins – which took a bejewelled hatpin to the blow-up egos of co-stars Madonna and Sharon Stone, among others – proved. But despite reviews that, above the sound of easily impressed critics noisily wetting themselves, could be heard comparing him to Evelyn Waugh, Noël Coward and Lord Byron, the question
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review: 'Twice Round the Daffodils' (re-release)

★★★★☆ Gerald Thomas' Twice Round the Daffodils (1962) is a classic example of what British cinema became known for during the 1960s (outside of kitchen sink dramas and Gothic horror) - old-fashioned, feel-good humour. Widely considered an unofficial entry to the Carry On canon, this comedy set within a TB sanatorium featured several of the iconic film series' production staff including director Gerald Thomas, producer Peter Rogers, writer Norman Hudis and cult actors Kenneth Williams and Joan Sims.

Read more »
See full article at CineVue »

DVD Review - Twice Round the Daffodils (1962)

Twice Round the Daffodils, 1962.

Directed by Gerald Thomas.

Starring Juliet Mills, Donald Sinden, Donald Houston, Kenneth Williams, Ronald Lewis, Andrew Ray, Joan Sims and Jill Ireland.

Synopsis:

A group of four male patients arrive at a sanatorium to be treated for tuberculosis. As they adjust to their new home, each one of them starts to take a shine to the nurse and try their best to gain her attention.

A classic piece of nostalgic British comedy comes to DVD in the shape of Twice Dound the Daffodils and you cannot help but love it if for no other reason than the ‘they don’t make them like this anymore’ factor. Produced and directed by the legendary ‘Carry On’ team of Peter Rogers and Gerald Thomas, you might expect this to me 85 minutes of innuendo and seaside postcard humour, but it is a much sweeter and poignant film than that.

Set in a hospital,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Saturday interview: Professor Mary Beard

With her new TV series about the lives of ordinary Romans, Professor Mary Beard wants to tackle history differently. The nation's new favourite classicist talks to Stuart Jeffries

"I'm trending on Twitter," says the professor of classics at Cambridge as we walk to the departure lounge at Heathrow's terminal five. But it's not all good news. One reason Mary Beard's trending is that some viewers have been unpleasant about what she looks like on Meet the Romans, her three-part BBC2 TV series that started on Tuesday.

"I've been getting tweets like 'Can't she brush her hair?', 'Shouldn't she be sexing herself up a bit?', 'Did she try to look so haggard?' Lucky I've got a thick skin. Sometimes you think they're writing this after half a bottle of wine, and I feel like writing back after more than half a bottle: 'Actually, that's what a 57-year-old woman looks like.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Win Twice Round the Daffodils on DVD

To mark the release of Twice Round the Daffidils on DVD, we’ve been given three copies to give away. It’s directed by Gerald Thomas and stars Kenneth Williams, Joan Sims, Sheila Hancock, Juliet Mills, Sir Donald Sinden, Nanette Newman and Jill Ireland.

A classic British comedy starring ‘Carry On’ legends Joan Sims and Kenneth Williams, Twice Round The Daffodils sees a group of four male patients arrive at a sanatorium to be treated for TB. As they adjust to their new home, each one of them starts to take a shine to the nurses that are there to care for them.

From the Carry On series team (producer Peter Rogers, director Gerald Thomas and writer Norman Hudis) and starring many of our well-loved British comedic stars, Twice Round The Daffodils is often considered an unofficial Carry On film.

To be in with a chance of winning this great prize,
See full article at HeyUGuys »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites