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Fritz Weaver Has Passed Away

  • DailyDead
Some very sad news is making the rounds today, as it has been reported that Fritz Weaver has passed away at the age of 90.

News of Fritz Weaver's passing was confirmed by Weaver's son-in-law, Bruce Ostler, according to The New York Times. In addition to winning a Tony award for his performance in 1970's Child’s Play, Weaver accumulated an impressive number of acting credits within the horror and sci-fi genres—on both the big and small screens—throughout his career.

Stephen King fans likely remember Weaver as Dexter Stanley from "The Crate" segment of Creepshow, where he starred alongside Hal Holbrook, Adrienne Barbeau, and the creepy creature unleashed from its prison.

Weaver also left his mark on a number of anthology series, including The Twilight Zone, Monsters, Tales From the Darkside, Night Gallery, and Tales of the Unexpected, in addition to appearances on Friday the 13th: The Series and The X-Files.
See full article at DailyDead »

Fritz Weaver Dies; Patrician Star Of Stage And Screen Was 90

Fritz Weaver, an actor who transmitted an air of patrician assurance in roles that took him from a regular presence in Golden Age television dramas to Broadway stardom, prominent characters in films including Fail-Safe in 1964, and an Emmy nomination for NBC’s acclaimed 1978 drama series Holocaust, died Saturday at home in Manhattan. He was 90. In that mini-series, Weaver played Dr. Josef Weiss, a Jewish doctor sent first to the Warsaw ghetto and then to the…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Fritz Weaver Dies; Patrician Star Of Stage And Screen Was 90

Fritz Weaver Dies; Patrician Star Of Stage And Screen Was 90
Fritz Weaver, an actor who transmitted an air of patrician assurance in roles that took him from a regular presence in Golden Age television dramas to Broadway stardom, prominent characters in films including Fail-Safe in 1964, and an Emmy nomination for NBC’s acclaimed 1978 drama series Holocaust, died Saturday at home in Manhattan. He was 90. In that mini-series, Weaver played Dr. Josef Weiss, a Jewish doctor sent first to the Warsaw ghetto and then to the…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Fritz Weaver, Acclaimed Actor Of Stage And Screen, Dead At Age 90

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro hosted Fritz Weaver at a screening of "Fail Safe" at the Players club in New York City. Here Editor-in-Chief Lee Pfeiffer (L) and contributor Paul Scrabo present Weaver with marketing materials for "To Trap a Spy", the feature film made from an extended version of the "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." TV show pilot, "The Vulcan Affair". Weaver discussed how surprised he was at the level of interest there was in the fact that he was the first U.N.C.L.E. villain. (Photo: GeorgeAnn Muller).

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Fritz Weaver, who won acclaim for his work in film, TV and on the Broadway stage, has passed away at age 90. Weaver was primarily a character actor but sometimes top-lined in stage productions.He played Sherlock Holmes in the 1960s Broadway musical production of "Baker Street". He won a Tony in 1970 for his performance in "Child's Play". Weaver also
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Demon Seed

Demon Seed (1977) was the latest in an ever growing subgenre of science fiction film: Technodoubt (okay, I just made that up). But as the world started to catch up with its imagination (Apple Computers was born in ’76), and technology raged forward like a silicon locomotive, Hollywood searched for ways to exploit mankind’s natural fear of progress. From the dangerously malfunctioning Hal in 2001 (1968), to the murderous androids of Westworld (’73), rich veins of cybernetic carnage were mined for maximum cinematic paranoia. Demon Seed upped the ante by downloading the menace right into the home.

Released in April by MGM, the film was not a commercial success by any means, but certainly drew attention from critics due to its unusual (and quite absurd) high concept story, a showcase performance from Julie Christie, and a piqued interest in director Donald Cammell. Regardless of the gateway, Demon Seed remains a unique genre treatise on dominance and loss.
See full article at DailyDead »

U.N.C.L.E.: Will International Moviegoers Save WB's Domestic Box Office Flop?

'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' 2015: Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer. 'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' movie is a domestic box office bomb: Will it be saved by international filmgoers? Directed by Sherlock Holmes' Guy Ritchie and toplining Man of Steel star Henry Cavill and The Lone Ranger costar Armie Hammer, the Warner Bros. release The Man from U.N.C.L.E. has been a domestic box office disaster, performing about 25 percent below – already quite modest – expectations. (See also: “'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' Movie: Bigger Box Office Flop Than Expected.”) This past weekend, the $80 million-budget The Man from U.N.C.L.E. collected a meager $13.42 million from 3,638 North American theaters, averaging $3,689 per site. After five days out, the big-screen reboot of the popular 1960s television series starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum has taken in a mere $16.77 million. For comparison's sake:
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Contest: Win The Food Of The Gods / Frogs, Empire Of The Ants / Jaws Of Satan Double Features on Blu-ray

Tomorrow, Scream Factory's unleashing respective double feature Blu-rays of The Food of the Gods and Frogs, and Empire of the Ants and Jaws of Satan. We've been provided with three Blu-ray copies of each double feature to give away to Daily Dead readers.

The Food Of The Gods

"Legendary director Bert I. Gordon (The Amazing Colossal Man, Attack of the Puppet People) – the father of the "gigantic creature" genre – delivers this spine-tingling tale of ecology gone berserk. Based on H.G. Wells' classic horror novel, The Food of the Gods predicts a terrifying future where oversized animals are suddenly at the top of the food chain and ready to take over!

On a remote island, a mysterious substance is oozing from the ground. A farmer sees that it acts as a growth hormone and thinks his fortune is made. But when rats, chickens, worms and wasps begin sampling the potent substance,
See full article at DailyDead »

May 26th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Frogs, Let Us Prey, Cannibal Ferox

With Memorial Day behind us and summer just right around the corner, the horror and sci-fi home releases are really begin to heat up as we’ve got a bunch of great cult classics and new indie genre films to look forward to this Tuesday. Scream Factory is giving fans a double dose of double features with their The Food of the Gods/Frogs and Empire of the Ants/Jaws of Satan Blu-rays and we’ve also got the latest from Dark Sky Films- Let Us Prey- arriving on both Blu-ray and DVD on May 26th.

Anchor Bay is also bringing home Spike Lee’s Da Sweet Blood of Jesus this week, Vinegar Syndrome is giving the cult film Madman a high-def upgrade and Universal is keeping busy as well with their releases of Seventh Son, The Loft and the Orson Welles classic Touch of Evil too.
See full article at DailyDead »

Blu-ray Reviews: Empire Of The Ants, Jaws Of Satan, Food Of The Gods, Frogs

Animal horror was big in the 1970s, and it’s not just the fault of Jaws. Environmental concerns carrying over from the previous decade were seeping into the American consciousness and, by extension, the American genre film.

Pesticides, pollution and ever-increasing concerns about nuclear power funneled their way into a slew of eco-horror movies in which mankind’s incessant tampering with the environment led Mother Nature to retaliate in the form killer animals, insects and fish, often mutated to gigantic size and always ready to kill. Titles like Grizzly and Night of the Lepus and Kingdom of the Spiders and The Swarm were de rigueur for ‘70s horror, and while the genre has never really gone away — every year sees a few new killer animal films (and that’s not counting the SyFy Channel nonsense like Crocosaurus) — it reached its zenith during that decade. Now as part of their Summer of Fear,
See full article at DailyDead »

Clips & Trailers from The Food Of The Gods / Frogs, Empire Of The Ants / Jaws Of Satan Double Feature Blu-rays

On May 26th, Scream Factory's unleashing nature-gone-wrong creature features, including the killer amphibians from Frogs, the giant rats from The Food of the Gods, the killer ants of Empire of the Ants, and the creepy king cobra from Jaws of Satan.

The Food Of The Gods

"Legendary director Bert I. Gordon (The Amazing Colossal Man, Attack of the Puppet People) – the father of the "gigantic creature" genre – delivers this spine-tingling tale of ecology gone berserk. Based on H.G. Wells' classic horror novel, The Food of the Gods predicts a terrifying future where oversized animals are suddenly at the top of the food chain and ready to take over!

On a remote island, a mysterious substance is oozing from the ground. A farmer sees that it acts as a growth hormone and thinks his fortune is made. But when rats, chickens, worms and wasps begin sampling the potent substance, they morph into bloodthirsty giants!
See full article at DailyDead »

The Food of the Gods / Frogs & Empire of the Ants / Jaws of Satan Double Feature Blu-ray Release Details

Long before he co-starred as James Dalton's memorable mentor and friend in Road House, Sam Elliott took on killer amphibians in 1972's Frogs, and with Scream Factory offering up two double doses of nature-gone-wrong creature features, Frogs is invading homes on Blu-ray this May along with the giant rats of The Food of the Gods, the killer ants of Empire of the Ants, and the creepy king cobra from Jaws of Satan.

Press release - "This spring, nature strikes back! On May 26, 2015 Scream Factory presents Food of the Gods and Frogs, two nature-gone-berserk shockers on Blu-ray for the first time. This release comes complete with bonus features, including new interviews with the films’ stars Belinda Balaski and Joan Van Ark.

The Food Of The Gods

Legendary director Bert I. Gordon (The Amazing Colossal Man, Attack of the Puppet People) – the father of the "gigantic creature" genre – delivers this spine-tingling tale of ecology gone berserk.
See full article at DailyDead »

Celebrating cinema's 15 less famous killer robots

Never mind The Terminator and Ed-209, what about Eve, Hector or Warbeast? Here's a pick of 15 less famous killer robots from the movies...

"They say Zapp Brannigan single-handedly saved the Octillion system from a horde of rampaging killbots!" enthused Leela in classic the Futurama episode, Love's Labour's Lost In Space.

It was, reflected the alcoholic, cigar-smoking robot Bender, "A grim day for Robotkind", before adding as an afterthought, "Eh, but we can always build more killbots."

Killer robots are a longstanding staple of science fiction cinema, and if we were to compile the list of the best and most celebrated, it would probably read pretty much like everyone else's - The Terminator, 2001: A Space Odyssey and the Sentinels from X-Men: Days Of Future Past would all get a mention.

But what about the less famous killer robots from film history - the ones that have been largely eclipsed by
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Cobbler | Review

Shoe Be Doo: McCarthy’s Magical Realism Has No Sole

Actor Thomas McCarthy has developed a solid reputation as an indie film director thanks to his first two films The Station Agent (2003) and The Visitor (2007). While his third outing, 2011’s Win Win, showcased a tendency for schmaltzy cliché, it’s a far cry from his most recent offering, The Cobbler. Headlining Adam Sandler, many expected this to be one of Sandler’s infrequent attempts at dramatic prowess, somewhere along the lines of his surprise turns in Punch Drunk Love, or even Spanglish…or even Men, Women & Children. Instead, McCarthy doggedly pursues a broad comedic tone, something that recalls old Jerry Lewis vehicles, except with a lethargic, bored star. Resolving a series of lazy dramatic conflicts, everyone involved coasts through this torporific exercise with grim determination.

A magical sewing machine that was inherited by one of his ancestors in the Lower
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Adam Sandler Walks In Your Shoes In New Trailer For The Cobbler

Image Entertainment has dropped a new trailer for Adam Sandler’s next movie, The Cobbler. Directed by Tom McCarthy (The Visitor, The Station Agent), the film revolves around a lonely shoesmith named Max Simkin, who one day finds himself endowed with a mysterious gift.

Keeping in line with his profession, the film quaintly expands on the mantra ‘walking in someone else’s shoes.’ As a shoe repair man whose business has been in the family for generations, when Simkin stumbles across a magical item, he finds himself able to slip on another person’s shoes and actually become them. What’s not explained through this fantasy plotting, is what actually happens to the real person who owns the shoes. Sandler isn’t really becoming them is he? He’s just himself – in their bodies, right?

Regardless of the details, the second trailer delves into a few elements missed in the original preview.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Review: "Meteor" (1979) Starring Sean Connery, Natalie Wood, Brian Keith And Karl Malden, Blu-ray Release From Kino Lorber Studio Classics

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Throughout motion picture history, there have always been "disaster" movies. From Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy facing the great earthquake in "San Francisco" to John Wayne trying to rescue an airliner in distress in "The High and the Mighty". However, the disaster movie didn't emerge as a genre until the 1970s. Most people credit "The Poseidon Adventure" (1972) with being the first major entry among these kinds of films during that era, but arguably the genre began two years earlier with "Airport". That blockbuster flick set the standard for all of the disaster movies to follow:

An all-star cast ranging from top boxoffice attractions to respected veteran stars and popular character actors Big production values State-of-the-art special effects Majestic musical score (and, if possible, a Top 40 hit shoe-horned into the proceedings)  A well-regarded director at the helm to preside over the mayhem

For the most part the formula worked fairly well.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Cobbler Trailer: Adam Sandler Has Magic Shoes in Thomas McCarthy’s Fantastical Drama

The first international trailer for director Thomas McCarthy’s (The Station Agent) fantasy drama The Cobbler has been released online, and it’s certainly something. The film stars Adam Sandler as a disillusioned shoe repairman who happens upon a magical heirloom that allows him to step into the lives of his customers and see things from their perspective. The project had a lot of promise given McCarthy’s resume (Win Win, The Visitor) and Sandler's return to more dramatic material, but it premiered to almost astoundingly bad reviews at Tiff and this trailer makes it look like one of those joke movies from Funny People. Obviously the premise is tricky to pull off in a convincing manner, but boy does this look like a misfire. That probably explains why it still hasn’t acquired domestic distribution. Watch the first The Cobbler trailer for yourself after the jump, and check out
See full article at Collider.com »

First Trailer For Adam Sandler Dramedy The Cobbler Packs A Nostalgic Punch

Former funnyman Adam Sandler’s career spikes every few years or so. Making a name for himself through a string of genuinely funny flicks in the ’90s, he has recently settled into a malaise of terrible comedies (Grown Ups, Jack And Jill) that ensure he’ll never have to worry about bills ever again. Then, out of the blue he’ll deliver a corking performance (Punch Drunk Love) that hints at a sterling actor lurking beneath his shouty curmudgeon persona. The question is, which Sandler should we expect from The Cobbler?

For Thomas McCarthy’s latest, Sandler plays New York cobbler Max. A happy-go-lucky sort, he longs for more adventure in his life. Lo and behold, at that precise moment of realisation, he stumbles across a magical totem that enables him to slot into the lives of his customers. Yes, a clever play on stepping into someone else’s shoes.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Scream Factory Announces Tentacles / Reptilicus & Empire of the Ants / Jaws of Satan Double Feature Blu-rays

  • DailyDead
Earlier this week, Scream Factory revealed they are releasing The Food of the Gods and Frogs next summer, and now the distributor has horror hounds looking forward to a creature feature season when school lets out, as four more titles have been brought onto the Blu-ray docket, pitting humans against a prehistoric reptile, a mutated octopus, killer ants, and a devilish king cobra.

From Scream Factory: “Since our announcement earlier this week of our double-bill of Food Of The Gods & Frogs went over so well with the majority, we thought it would be exciting/surprising if we followed it up and revealed Four more “Animal-Creature attack” films coming sometime next Summer for the first time on the blu-ray format! So without further ado…

– Bert I Gordon’s Empire Of The Ants (with “Dynasty’s” Joan Collins battling radioactive insects) will be paired with 1982’s devil-possessed cobra film Jaws Of Satan
See full article at DailyDead »

Wamg’s Guide To 100+ Films For Fall / Holiday 2014

As we look in the rearview mirror of the summer blockbusters, September heralds the start of the fall movie season. Filled with Hollywood heavyweights and A-listers, here’s our Big list of the most anticipated movies coming to cinemas this autumn and during the holidays.

Our exhaustive list includes films that are playing at the upcoming Toronto Film Festival as well the ones that already have a theatrical release date. With the awards season on the horizon, we also added a few bonus films at the end to keep your eye out for in the months ahead.

Pull up a chair, grab a pen and paper and get ready for Wamg’s Guide to the 100+ Films This Fall And Holiday Season.

We kick it off with what’s showing in Toronto at the film festival that runs September 4 – 14.

Maps To The Stars – September 2014 – Toronto International Film Festival; UK & Ireland September
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Adam Sandler’s Shoes Take Center Stage in First The Cobbler Poster

Ahead of the film’s world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival next weekend, we’ve managed to get our hands on the first The Cobbler poster for director Thomas McCarthy’s (Win Win) upcoming fantasy drama. The film stars Adam Sandler as a disillusioned shoe repairman who happens upon a magical heirloom that allows him to step into the lives of his customers and see things from their perspective. As a fan of McCarthy’s previous work—especially The Station Agent—I’m very much looking forward to seeing how he handles a more fantastical concept. He’s not entirely unfamiliar with the genre, as McCarthy previously worked on the script for Pixar’s Up, but this also marks a curious turn for Sandler given McCarthy’s dramatic background. Hopefully the two make a strong pairing. Hit the jump to take a look at the first The Cobbler poster.
See full article at Collider.com »
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