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Daily Dead’s 2016 Holiday Gift Guide & Giveaways: Day 11 – Waxwork Records, FiveFingerTees, Star Wars Books, Hero Complex Gallery & More!

  • DailyDead
Welcome back for Day 11 of Daily Dead’s fourth annual Holiday Gift Guide, readers! Once again, our goal is to help you navigate through the horrors of the 2016 shopping season with our tips on unique gift ideas, and we’ll hopefully help you save a few bucks over the next few weeks, too. For our second-to-last day of this year’s Gift Guide, we’re going to be featuring several great cult films that arrived on Blu-ray in 2016, as well as Star Wars books, a ton of horror-themed enamel pins, the amazing artwork of Hero Complex Gallery, FiverFingerTees, and much more!

This year’s Holiday Gift Guide is sponsored by several amazing companies, including Mondo, Anchor Bay Entertainment, DC Entertainment, and Magnolia Home Entertainment, who have all donated an assortment of goodies to help get you into the spirit of the season. Daily Dead also recently teamed up with
See full article at DailyDead »

September 20th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Beware! The Blob, Labyrinth 30th Anniversary Edition

  • DailyDead
The third week of September has a lot of fantastic horror and sci-fi home entertainment offerings coming our way, including an incredible pair of Criterion Blu-ray releases—Cat People (1942) and Blood Simple—as well as the 30th Anniversary Edition of Labyrinth and the Special Edition of Brian Trenchard-Smith’s Dead End Drive-In. Other notable titles being released on September 20th include the horror doc The Blackout Experiments (which premiered earlier this year at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival), Sacrifice, The Rift (1990), Beware! The Blob, and a Blu-ray set featuring all kinds of Twin Peaks goodness.

Beware! The Blob (Kino Lorber, Blu-ray & DVD)

Newly Re-mastered in HD! The Blob returns... more outrageous than ever in this 1972 sequel to the popular sci-fi classic! Plenty of familiar faces, including Robert Walker Jr. (Ensign Pulver), Larry Hagman (Dallas), Sid Haig (Busting), Burgess Meredith (Rocky), Dick Van Patten (Eight is Enough), Godfrey Cambridge
See full article at DailyDead »

Hugh O’Brian, Star of TV’s ‘The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp,’ Dies at 91

Hugh O’Brian, Star of TV’s ‘The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp,’ Dies at 91
Hugh O’Brian, who starred in the long-running series “The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp,” died Monday. He was 91.

The actor died peacefully in his Beverly Hills home, according to a statement from Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership.

ABC Western “The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp,” in which the exceedingly handsome, muscular O’Brian starred as the title character, ran for 221 episodes from 1955-61. At the time he was one of television’s great male sex symbols.

In 1957 he was nominated for an Emmy for best continuing performance by an actor in a dramatic series for his work on “The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp.”

So popular and so much a part of popular culture was O’Brian that he showed up as Earp, uncredited, in the 1959 Bob Hope Western comedy “Alias Jesse James,” as well as in the 1960 TV movie “The Secret World of Eddie Hodges”; when the actor guested on “Make Room for Daddy” in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Beware! The Blob Blu-ray / DVD Release Details & Cover Art

Years after Steve McQueen’s character helped stop the Blob from absorbing an entire small town, the gelatinous terror returned to ooze eerily in Beware! The Blob (aka Son of Blob) Earlier this year, Kino Lorber announced that they were releasing the 1972 sequel on Blu-ray and DVD, and now they have revealed the debut date, cover art, and special features for the home media release.

From Kino Lorber: “Coming September 20th on Blu-ray and DVD!

Brand New 2016 HD Master!

Beware! The Blob (1972) aka Son of Blob!

Special Features:

Audio Commentary by Film Historian Richard Harland Smith Alternate Title Sequence Trailers”

Beware! The Blob stars Robert Walker Jr., Gwynne Gilford, Godfrey Cambridge, Carol Lynley, Larry Hagman, Dick Van Patten, Shelley Berman, Gerrit Graham, Richard Stahl, Richard Webb, Sig Haig, and Burgess Meredith. The sequel was directed by Larry Hagman from a screenplay by Anthony Harris and Jack Woods. For those unfamiliar with the film,
See full article at DailyDead »

16mm Screening of Easy Rider March 7th at Schlafly Bottleworks

“You know, this used to be a helluva good country. I can’t understand what’s gone wrong with it.”

Easy Rider screens in 16mm at 7:30pm Monday March 7th at Schlafly Bottleworks in Maplewood

The perfect film to watch in old-school 16mm!

Easy Rider (1969) is much more than a 60s relic – it’s still a great movie even today. I find it fascinating that Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda took Roger Corman material and gave it an European- influenced arthouse approach. Combined with breathtaking visuals, a well-chosen rock soundtrack and some classic, stoned, improvised dialogue Easy Rider is still an impressive movie all these years later. Fonda had recently made The Wild Angels, Hopper the less remembered The Glory Stompers, and Jack Nicholson Hells Angels On Wheels, but Easy Rider reinvented the biker movie (or technically created a new subgenre: the “hippy” Biker Film), and things were never
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Superficial 'News,' Mineo-Dean Bromance-Romance and Davis' fading 'Star': 31 Days of Oscar

'Broadcast News' with Albert Brooks and Holly Hunter: Glib TV news watch. '31 Days of Oscar': 'Broadcast News' slick but superficial critics pleaser (See previous post: “Phony 'A Beautiful Mind,' Unfairly Neglected 'Swing Shift': '31 Days of Oscar'.”) Heralded for its wit and incisiveness, James L. Brooks' multiple Oscar-nominated Broadcast News is everything the largely forgotten Swing Shift isn't: belabored, artificial, superficial. That's very disappointing considering Brooks' highly addictive Mary Tyler Moore television series (and its enjoyable spin-offs, Phyllis and Rhoda), but totally expected considering that three of screenwriter-director Brooks' five other feature films were Terms of Endearment, As Good as It Gets, and Spanglish. (I've yet to check out I'll Do Anything and the box office cataclysm How Do You Know starring Reese Witherspoon, Paul Rudd, and Jack Nicholson.) Having said that, Albert Brooks (no relation to James L.; or to Mel Brooks
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Kino Lorber to Release Beware! The Blob on Blu-ray / DVD

  • DailyDead
Following the debut of Irvin Yeaworth Jr.'s The Blob in 1958, filmgoers were safe from its absorbent wrath until Beware! The Blob (aka Son of Blob) invaded the big screen in 1972. Now Kino Lorber is looking to bring the oozing menace into living rooms with their newly announced Blu-ray and DVD release of The Blob sequel.

Kino Lorber revealed today that they will release Beware! The Blob on Blu-ray and DVD sometime in 2016. The enhanced release will benefit from a new HD master. No special features are known at this time, but we'll keep Daily Dead readers updated on further announcements.

Beware! The Blob stars Robert Walker Jr., Gwynne Gilford, Godfrey Cambridge, Carol Lynley, Larry Hagman, Dick Van Patten, Shelley Berman, Gerrit Graham, Richard Stahl, Richard Webb, Sig Haig, and Burgess Meredith. The sequel was directed by Larry Hagman from a screenplay by Anthony Harris and Jack Woods. For those unfamiliar with the film,
See full article at DailyDead »

Nyfcc Awards Have Boosted Academy Award Chances for 'Carol,' Stewart and 'Saul'

New York Film Critics Awards: Best Film winner 'Carol' with Cate Blanchett. 2015 New York Film Critics Awards have enlivened Oscar race Catching up with previously announced awards season winners that will likely influence the 2016 Oscar nominations. Early this month, the New York Film Critics Circle announced their Best of 2015 picks, somewhat unexpectedly boosting the chances of Todd Haynes' lesbian romantic drama Carol, Clouds of Sils Maria actress Kristen Stewart, and László Nemes' Holocaust drama Son of Saul. Below is a brief commentary about each of these Nyfcc choices. 'Carol' Directed by Todd Haynes, starring two-time Oscar winner Cate Blanchett (The Aviator, Blue Jasmine) and Oscar nominee Rooney Mara (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo), and adapted by Phyllis Nagy from Patricia Highsmith's 1952 novel The Price of Salt,[1] Carol won a total of four New York Film Critics awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

16mm Screening of Easy Rider October 5th at Schlafly Bottleworks

“You know, this used to be a helluva good country. I can’t understand what’s gone wrong with it.”

Easy Rider screens in 16mm at 7:30pm Monday October 5th at Schlafly Bottleworks in Maplewood

The perfect film to watch in old-school 16mm!

Easy Rider (1969) is much more than a 60s relic – it’s still a great movie even today. I find it fascinating that Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda took Roger Corman material and gave it an European- influenced arthouse approach. Combined with breathtaking visuals, a well-chosen rock soundtrack and some classic, stoned, improvised dialogue Easy Rider is still an impressive movie all these years later. Fonda had recently made The Wild Angels, Hopper the less remembered The Glory Stompers, and Jack Nicholson Hells Angels On Wheels, but Easy Rider reinvented the biker movie (or technically created a new subgenre: the “hippy” Biker Film), and things were never
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Easy Rider Screens on 16mm August 3rd at Schlafly Bottleworks

“You know, this used to be a helluva good country. I can’t understand what’s gone wrong with it.”

Easy Rider screens in 16mm at 7:30pm Monday August 3rd at Schlafly Bottleworks in Maplewood

Easy Rider (1969) is much more than a 60s relic – it’s still a great movie even today. I find it fascinating that Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda took Roger Corman material and gave it an European- influenced arthouse approach. Combined with breathtaking visuals, a well-chosen rock soundtrack and some classic, stoned, improvised dialogue Easy Rider is still an impressive movie all these years later. Fonda had recently made The Wild Angels, Hopper the less remembered The Glory Stompers, and Jack Nicholson Hells Angels On Wheels, but Easy Rider reinvented the biker movie (or technically created a new subgenre: the “hippy” Biker Film), and things were never quite the same in Hollywood for the rest of the Seventies.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Marcia Strassman: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About Her Career

Marcia Strassman made her mark as the 1970s version of Alice Kramden, playing the (mostly) understanding wife of Gabe Kaplan on ABC’s “Welcome Back, Kotter.”

But Strassman, who died Friday at 66, was in showbiz for more than 10 years before she wound up on the sitcom that became a pop culture touchstone, in part because it made a star of John Travolta.

Lithe and raspy-voiced, Strassman began her showbiz career on stage and also tried to become a pop star in the mid-1960s before her thesping work took off. After she got her break on “Kotter,” she became active in the Screen Actors Guild.

Here are 12 things you didn’t know about Strassman’s early career:

She got off to a good start in the pages of Variety. Her first reference came in the Sept. 11, 1963 edition, in an item noting that she would replace Liza Minnelli in Off Broadway’s “Best Foot Forward,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Top 15 Movies of This Past Year: Do Audiences Really Want Original, Quality Stories?

Top box office movies of 2013: If you make original, quality films… (photo: Sandra Bullock has two movies among the top 15 box office hits of 2013; Bullock is seen here in ‘The Heat,’ with Melissa McCarthy) (See previous post: “2013 Box Office Record? History is Remade If a Few ‘Minor Details’ Ignored.”) As further evidence that moviegoers want original, quality entertainment, below you’ll find a list of the top 15 movies at the domestic box office in 2013 — nine of which are sequels or reboots (ten if you include Oz the Great and Powerful), and more than half of which are 3D releases. Disney and Warner Bros. were the two top studios in 2013. Disney has five movies among the top 15; Warners has three. With the exception of the sleeper blockbuster Gravity, which, however dumbed down, targeted a more mature audience, every single one of the titles below were aimed either at teenagers/very,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tough Dame Totter Dead at 95: One of the Last Surviving Stars of Hollywood Noirs

Femme fatale Audrey Totter: Film noir actress and MGM leading lady dead at 95 (photo: Audrey Totter ca. 1947) Audrey Totter, film noir femme fatale and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract player best remembered for the mystery crime drama Lady in the Lake and, at Rko, the hard-hitting boxing drama The Set-Up, died after suffering a stroke and congestive heart failure on Thursday, December 12, 2013, at West Hills Hospital in Los Angeles County. Reportedly a resident at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, Audrey Totter would have turned 96 on Dec. 20. Born in Joliet, Illinois, Audrey Totter began her show business career on radio. She landed an MGM contract in the mid-’40s, playing bit roles in several of the studio’s productions, e.g., the Clark Gable-Greer Garson pairing Adventure (1945), the Hedy Lamarr-Robert Walker-June Allyson threesome Her Highness and the Bellboy (1945), and, as an adventurous hitchhiker riding with John Garfield,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Georges Lautner obituary

Director of witty French comedy-thrillers

Since the dawn of cinema, France has simultaneously and uninterruptedly produced good mainstream movies and arthouse films. Georges Lautner, who has died aged 87, unabashedly claimed that the almost 50 films he directed from 1958 to 1992 belong to the former category. Lautner's mainly cops-and-robbers movies were among the most popular films ever made in France.

"I didn't want glory or to make masterpieces but popular films that would please the greatest number," he once explained. "International recognition didn't interest me. I was passionate at what I did with my faithful team. We made the films we wanted as quickly as possible. But with time, my commercial films appear almost intellectual."

Lautner's underestimated films were never invited to Cannes until, in 2012, the festival put together a belated "Homage to Georges Lautner". His death prompted President François Hollande to declare that his films had "become part of the cinematic heritage
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

On TCM: Larger Than Life Douglas Turns 97 Next December

Kirk Douglas movies: The Theater of Larger Than Life Performances Kirk Douglas, a three-time Best Actor Academy Award nominee and one of the top Hollywood stars of the ’50s, is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" featured star today, August 30, 2013. Although an undeniably strong screen presence, no one could ever accuse Douglas of having been a subtle, believable actor. In fact, even if you were to place side by side all of the widescreen formats ever created, they couldn’t possibly be wide enough to contain his larger-than-life theatrical emoting. (Photo: Kirk Douglas ca. 1950.) Right now, TCM is showing Andrew V. McLaglen’s 1967 Western The Way West, a routine tale about settlers in the Old American Northwest that remains of interest solely due to its name cast. Besides Douglas, The Way West features Robert Mitchum, Richard Widmark, Lola Albright, and 21-year-old Sally Field in her The Flying Nun days.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tonight: Casablanca Hero Goes from Schumann to Ziegfeld to Vegas

Paul Henreid: Actor was ‘dependable’ leading man to Hollywood actresses Paul Henreid, best known as the man who wins Ingrid Bergman’s body but not her heart in Casablanca, is Turner Classic Movies’ Star of the Month of July 2013. TCM will be showing a couple of dozen movies featuring Henreid, who, though never a top star, was a "dependable" — i.e., unexciting but available — leading man to a number of top Hollywood actresses of the ’40s, among them Bette Davis, Ida Lupino, Olivia de Havilland, Eleanor Parker, Joan Bennett, and Katharine Hepburn. Unfortunately, the overwhelming majority of Paul Henreid movies to be shown on Turner Classic Movies in July consists of Warner Bros. productions that are frequently broadcast all year long, no matter who is TCM’s Star of the Month. Just as unfortunately, TCM will not present any of Henreid’s little-seen supporting performances of the ’30s, e.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Eight Counts of Grand Theft Cinema

We love crime movies. We may go on and on about Scorsese’s ability to incorporate Italian neo-realism techniques into Mean Streets (1973), the place of John Huston’s The Asphalt Jungle (1950) in the canon of postwar noir, The Godfather (1972) as a socio-cultural commentary on the distortion of the ideals of the American dream blah blah blah, yadda yadda yadda…but that ain’t it.

We love crime movies because we love watching a guy who doesn’t have to behave, who doesn’t have to – nor care to – put a choker on his id and can let his darkest, most visceral impulses run wild. Some smart-mouth gopher tells hood Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci), “Go fuck yourself,” in Scorsese’s Goodfellas (1990), and does Tommy roll with it? Does he spit back, “Fuck me? Nah, fuck you!” Does he go home and tell his mother?

Nope.

He pulls a .45 cannon out from
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Jack Nicholson Movies: Rating The Actor's Best And Worst Films

What's Jack Nicholson's secret? Maybe it's the eyebrows, hovering like ironic quotation marks over every line reading. Maybe it's the hooded eyes, which hold the threat of danger or the promise of joviality -- you're never sure which. Same with that sharklike grin. Or maybe it's the voice, which has evolved over the years from a thin sneer to a deep rumble, but is always precisely calibrated to provoke a reaction. Put them all together, and they say: "I am a man to be reckoned with. Ignore me at your peril." Nicholson, who turns 75 on April 22, is often criticized for relying on his bag of tricks, for just showing up and doing Jack Nicholson (though indeed, he often seems to have been hired precisely for that purpose). But he's also capable of burrowing deep into a character, finding his wounded heart, and revealing the ugly truth without fear or vanity.
See full article at Moviefone »

The history of MGM: the golden era

Zoe’s continues her journey through the turbulent history of one of Hollywood’s most influential studios, as we arrive at MGM's post-war golden era. Plus, a bit of 3D, too...

As the end of World War II approached, a new world dawned for MGM – a world which had changed dramatically. Attitudes and lifestyles had changed, but most importantly audiences had changed. Here was an opportunity: MGM’s chance to start afresh. And so in 1944, MGM embarked on what would become the most successful period in its history. After the war, the slate was wiped clean.

Gone were the tired, tried-and-tested formulas, and gone were the aging names and stars, as a new unit was established at MGM. It was up to this unit, anchored by an experienced producer and made up of bright young talent, to transform MGM’s signature high-production style into something new and modern in order
See full article at Den of Geek »

Disney reviving King Of The Elves and prepping The Hill

Originally announced all the way back in 2008, one of Disney’s most talked about projects is their still-gestating project entitled King Of The Elves. With the director’s chair in flux, Bolt helmer Chris Williams had taken over for Aaron Blaise and Robert Walker, the film’s future was put into question almost as fast as it was announced.

Read more on Disney reviving King Of The Elves and prepping The Hill...
See full article at GordonandtheWhale »
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