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Bill Hader: How the ‘Barry’ Creator Found His Cinematic Voice in ‘Ronny/Lily’

Bill Hader: How the ‘Barry’ Creator Found His Cinematic Voice in ‘Ronny/Lily’
Bill Hader hasn’t been shy about his dream of becoming a film director. One of his motivations in creating HBO’s “Barry” with Alec Berg was to leverage his value as performer in order to get an opportunity to direct a couple of episodes while guiding the visual language of the show. Yet in looking back at Season 1, Hader feels like he was far too timid in the first two episodes he directed.

“I felt like on Season 1 I didn’t do a good job of some things,” said Hader when he was a guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit. “When I’d look back I went, ‘Oh man, I wish I’d stuck to my guns. I saw that in a specific way and I kind of chickened out.’ Or if someone said, “Oh, don’t you want to do it this way?’ And I went, ‘Ok,’ and
See full article at Indiewire »

New Festival Tastemakers: Lili Hinstin, Kim Yutani & Diana Sanchez Discuss Diversity & The Changing State Of Film Festivals — Deadline Disruptors

  • Deadline
New Festival Tastemakers: Lili Hinstin, Kim Yutani & Diana Sanchez Discuss Diversity & The Changing State Of Film Festivals — Deadline Disruptors
The Cannes Competition line-up of 50 years ago was an extraordinary one; a who’s who of iconic filmmakers. Among the 26 competing for the Palme d’Or were Sidney Lumet, Louis Malle, Andrzej Wajda, Pierre Étaix, Lindsay Anderson, Volker Schlöndorff, Costa-Gavras, Éric Rohmer, Glauber Rocha, Ronald Neame and Dennis Hopper.

While it wouldn’t have seemed unusual at the time, today the maleness of that line-up really stands out. Festival selections hold a mirror up to those who select them as well as the society and culture within which they exist.

50 years on, a zero count of women filmmakers in Competition has haltingly increased to four—a joint-record for the festival, which has still only once awarded its main prize to a woman. Just 86 women directors have played in Competition compared to more than 1,600 men. And it’s not only in Competition that Cannes struggles. Of 24 films in Directors’ Fortnight this year,
See full article at Deadline »

Cannes Classics: Alfonso Cuarón To Present ‘The Shining’, Peter Fonda To Present ‘Easy Rider’

  • Deadline
Cannes Classics: Alfonso Cuarón To Present ‘The Shining’, Peter Fonda To Present ‘Easy Rider’
Alfonso Cuarón will present a restored version of Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining and Peter Fonda will present a restored Easy Rider as part of this year’s Cannes Classics lineup.

Kubrick’s horror classic was has been remastered by Warner Bros in 4K using a new 4K scan of the original 35mm camera negative. After being presented 50 years ago on the Croisette, Dennis Hopper’s 1969 classic Easy Rider has been restored in 4K by Sony Pictures Entertainment in collaboration with Cineteca di Bologna. It was restored from the 35mm original picture negative.

The sidebar (see the full lineup below) will screen three Luis Buñuel films and Vittorio De Sica’s Miracle In Milan. There will also be a tribute to Lina Wertmüller, the first female filmmaker ever nominated as a director at the Academy Awards in 1977 for Pasqualino Settebellezze. Wertmüller will introduce the film with lead actor Giancarlo Giannini in attendance.
See full article at Deadline »

Movie Poster of the Week: Movie Trilogies

  • MUBI
For auteurists in New York there can hardly be a better series playing right now than "Trilogies" at Film Forum: a four-week extravaganza of 78 films comprising 26 mini director retrospectives from Angelopoulos to Wenders and 24 other auteurs in between. Many of the groupings in the series are actual sequential trilogies, like Kobayashi’s The Human Condition or Satyajit Ray’s Apu Trilogy, while others more loosely stretch the term, such as Lucrecia Martel’s "Salta Trilogy" or Hou Hsiao-hsien’s "Coming of Age Trilogy," very welcome though those are.Very few of the trilogies in the series, however, have posters that were conceived as trios themselves, the French posters for Kieslowski’s Three Colors, above, and Albert Dubout’s cartoony designs for Marcel Pagnol’s Marseilles Trilogy being the major exceptions. There are two terrific matching posters by Jan Lenica for the first two films in Mark Donskoy's Maxim Gorky Trilogy,
See full article at MUBI »

‘Quartet’ Trailer: Merchant Ivory’s Surprisingly Dark Love Triangle Drama Gets a Restoration

‘Quartet’ Trailer: Merchant Ivory’s Surprisingly Dark Love Triangle Drama Gets a Restoration
Most cinephiles associate the Merchant Ivory catalogue with English dramas like “A Room With a View” and “Howards End” — even the film company’s own Wikipedia page makes amusing note of how many of their best-known features follow “genteel characters who suffer from disillusionment and tragic entanglements” and often involve some kind of house — but with 44 films in its library, Merchant Ivory contains its own vastly different multitudes.

One such unexpected entry: the Jean Rhys adaptation “Quartet,” inspired by the “Wide Sargasso Sea” author’s own experiences as an up-and-comer in swinging Paris. While the film’s pedigree is classic Merchant Ivory — written by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, directed by James Ivory, produced by Ismail Merchant — its subject matter and tone are a fair bit different than some of the more staid dramas in the company’s oeuvre. For one thing, it’s a surprisingly dramatic story of a love triangle gone darkly awry.
See full article at Indiewire »

Hanging on the Word: A Conversation with Krzysztof Zanussi

  • MUBI
EtherAs he approaches his 80th birthday, distinguished Polish filmmaker Krzysztof Zanussi shows little sign of letting up. Although his reputation in wider cinephile culture has diminished somewhat since a remarkably febrile period in the 1970s and 80s (several films from which were seen in last year’s retrospective on Mubi), Zanussi remains an ambassador for his nation’s cinema internationally, in an esteemed triumvirate alongside dearly departed colleagues Krzysztof Kieslowśki and Andrzej Wajda.Zanussi’s latest film, pre-First World War drama Ether, premiered at the Rome Film Festival in October and continues the director’s recent interest in examining the structures of power and our relationship to religion. In something of a warping of the stereotypical “Zanussoid” protagonists for which he originally became famous—young, scientifically-inclined men searching for meaning, often in a hostile world—Ether follows a doctor using morally questionable means to pursue his studies into the oppressive potential of the eponymous chemical.
See full article at MUBI »

The Criterion Channel Unveils Launch Lineup for April

In just two weeks, a cinematic haven will launch. After the demise of FilmStruck left cinephiles in a dark depression, The Criterion Channel has stepped up to the plate to launch their own separate service coming to the U.S. and Canada on Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku, iOS, and Android and Android TV devices. Now, after giving us a taste of what is to come with their Movies of the Week, they’ve unveiled the staggeringly great lineup for their first month.

Along with the Criterion Collection and Janus Films’ library of 1,000 feature films, 350 shorts, and 3,500 supplementary features–including trailers, introductions, behind-the-scenes documentaries, interviews, video essays, commentary tracks, and rare archival footage–the service will also house films from Sony Pictures, Warner Bros., Paramount Pictures, Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM), Lionsgate, IFC Films, Kino Lorber, Cohen Media, Milestone Film and Video, Oscilloscope, Cinema Guild, Strand Releasing, Shout Factory, Film Movement,
See full article at The Film Stage »

More Than Half of Films at Hot Docs Film Festival Are Directed by Women

  • Variety
More than half of the films playing at Hot Docs, North America’s largest documentary festival, are directed by women, the Canadian event said Tuesday. The festival’s 26th edition, which runs April 25-May 5, will screen 234 films, with 54% of the directors being women.

In the competitive International Spectrum program, notable films receiving their world premieres include Nicole Schafer’s “Buddha in Africa,” about a Malawian boy raised in a Chinese Buddhist orphanage, who’s torn between his heritage and upbringing; Pailin Wedel’s “Hope Frozen,” which profiles a grief-stricken Bangkok family and their unorthodox decision to cryopreserve their deceased daughter; Marcela Arteaga’s “The Guardian of Memory,” a film that reveals the desperate stories of Mexicans fleeing the violence of their country toward an unfriendly U.S. border; and Jolanta Dylewska and Andrzej Wajda’s “Marek Edelman… and There Was Love in the Ghetto,” an artful recreation of the Holocaust
See full article at Variety »

First Footage From Berlin Competition Film ‘Mr. Jones’ (Exclusive)

  • Variety
First Footage From Berlin Competition Film ‘Mr. Jones’ (Exclusive)
Variety has been given exclusive access to first-look footage from Academy Award nominee Agnieszka Holland’s “Mr. Jones,” which world premieres in Official Competition at the Berlin Film Festival. The film stars James Norton, Vanessa Kirby and Peter Sarsgaard.

Mr. Jones” tells the little-known story of Gareth Jones, an ambitious young Welsh journalist who travelled to the Soviet Union in 1933, and discovered the appalling reality behind the myth of a communist “utopia.” What started out as a regular news investigation, soon turned into a life-or-death quest to uncover the truth about a government-induced famine in Ukraine. His efforts are frustrated not just by Soviet censors but other Western journalists who enjoy the patronage of Stalin’s regime, most notably Walter Duranty, the Moscow bureau chief of the New York Times. Jones’ story helped inspire George Orwell’s allegorical dystopian novel “Animal Farm.”

In a statement, Holland said: “We wanted to
See full article at Variety »

Agnieszka Holland slams "lukewarm" Hollywood cinema during Rotterdam lecture

Polish director delivers lecture to Iffr attendees.

Speaking at her masterclass at International Film Festival Rotterdam this weekend, Agnieszka Holland has expressed her dismay at what she calls the lack of “cultural identity” in contemporary mainstream cinema.

“Cinema became as boring as life,” Holland said of films being made in what she referred to as an era of “consumption and new technologies”, when the majority of filmmakers don’t have “a significant human or historical experience to discuss.”

The prolific Holland (whose latest feature Mr Jones premieres in competition at the Berlinale next month and who is also preparing an
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Arthouse Distributor Film Movement Grows TV Footprint With ‘Sara Stein’ Dramas From Beta & Doc Series ‘Nazi Junkies’

  • Deadline
U.S. distributor Film Movement is growing its TV footprint with the acquisitions of four TV movies from Beta Film and documentary series Hidden History (which will be renamed Nazi Junkies) from Paris-based outfit #Edith Paris.

“Although we’ve long built our catalog with award-winning feature films from around the world, we’re excited to be turning our attentions to acquisitions of broadcast content,” explained Film Movement President Michael Rosenberg. “Now more than ever, there are countless hours of intriguing programming perfect for North American audiences, and we’re looking forward to expanding Film Movement’s library with compelling television-based content.”

The four Sara Stein TV movies (4×90), which Film Movement will distribute across North America, follow the cases of Berlin criminal investigator Sara Stein (Katharina Lorenz), who cultivates a low-key style, abhors violence and spends much of her work between Tel Aviv and the German capital. The four movies comprise Sara Stein: Shalom Berlin,
See full article at Deadline »

‘Cold War’ director Pawel Pawlikowski could make history with 2nd Oscar win for Best Foreign Language Film

  • Gold Derby
‘Cold War’ director Pawel Pawlikowski could make history with 2nd Oscar win for Best Foreign Language Film
In the Oscar race for Best Foreign Language Film, don’t underestimate the Polish romantic drama “Cold War,” whose director Pawel Pawlikowski helmed a previous winner, “Ida” (2014), and would be only the seventh person to direct multiple Oscar winners for Best Foreign Film, and just the second in the last 43 years.

The filmmakers who previously achieved this distinction include some of the international legends you might expect, including Vittorio De Sica, Federico Fellini, Ingmar Bergman and Akira Kurosawa. French filmmaker Rene Clement also prevailed twice, both times between the years of 1947 and 1955 when the category was presented as a special honorary award. Japanese master Kurosawa’s second prize came for “Dersu Uzala” (1975), but he was the last multiple winner until the 21st century, when Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi doubled up with “A Separation” (2011) and “The Salesman” (2016).

Other internationally renowned filmmakers you might expect to have won repeatedly only won once,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Witold Sobocinski Dies: Cinematographer On Films By Polanski, Wajda & Others Was 89

  • Deadline
Witold Sobocinski Dies: Cinematographer On Films By Polanski, Wajda & Others Was 89
Witold Sobocinski, a Polish cinematographer who worked with countrymen including Roman Polanski, Andrzej Wajda and Krzysztof Zanussi and also was a celebrated jazz musician and a teacher at Lodz Film School, has died. He was 89. Lodz announced the news but did not give details.

Sobocinski was one of the first graduates of Lodz’s cinematography department and had taught there since the 1980s. His son, Piotr Sobocinski, also was a celebrated Dp, having scored an Oscar nod for Three Colors: Red and worked on such films as Hearts in Atlantis, Marvin’s Room and Ransom. He died in 2001.

Among the directors he worked with and their films are Polański, Wajda, Zanussi (Życie rodzinne), Jerzy Skolimowski (Ręce do góry), Wojciech Jerzy Has (The Hourglass Sanatorium), Piotr Szulkin and Andrzej Żuławski (The Third Part of the Night).

Among his many career honors,
See full article at Deadline »

Witold Sobocinski, Polish Cinematographer, Dies at 89

Witold Sobocinski, Polish Cinematographer, Dies at 89
Witold Sobocinski, the respected Polish cinematographer who collaborated with directors Andrzej Wajda and Roman Polanski, among others, has died. He was 89.

His death was announced Monday by the National Film School in Lodz, Poland, where he was a professor as well as a graduate.

On Nov. 10, Sobocinski was in Bydgoszcz, Poland, at the 26th Camerimage International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography to receive the Camerimage Lifetime Achievement Award. Polanski presented the award to him, and director Ron Howard and cinematographer Janusz Kaminski congratulated him via prerecorded videos.

The festival described him as "one of the ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Roman Polanski Joins EnergaCamerimage’s Emotional Tribute to Lenser Witold Sobocinski

  • Variety
Roman Polanski Joins EnergaCamerimage’s Emotional Tribute to Lenser Witold Sobocinski
Europe’s mainstay fest for cinematography, newly rechristened EnergaCamerimage, launched its 26th edition and a week of 241 film screenings in the Polish town of Bydgoszcz on Saturday with a guest appearance by Roman Polanski.

The controversial but seminal director of classics such as “Rosemary’s Baby” and “Chinatown” took the stage to honor a longtime colleague, cinematographer Witold Sobocinski, with a lifetime achievement award for his luminous lensing. The pair, who shared stories from film school in Poland under the former communist regime, worked together in 1988 on “Frantic,” the Paris-set thriller starring Emmanuelle Seigner, now Polanski’s wife.

The master lenser also filmed “The Wedding” and the Oscar-nommed “The Promised Land,” both directed by Andrzej Wajda.

Fest director Marek Zydowicz credited Sobocinski with influencing a generation of cinematographers, noting he continues to teach at the Lodz film school that has set dozens of future directors and camera people on their professional paths.
See full article at Variety »

Cold War review – love in a communist climate

Paweł Pawlikowski’s love letter to his parents is a sweeping tale of passion and politics set in the shadow of the iron curtain

Paweł Pawlikowski won the best director award at Cannes in May for this sweepingly intimate love story about a star-crossed couple falling together and apart, through the iron curtain of postwar Europe. It is inspired by (and dedicated to) his parents, whom Pawlikowski has described as “the most interesting dramatic characters I’ve ever come across … both strong, wonderful people, but as a couple a never-ending disaster”.

Yet while screen lovers Wiktor and Zula share names and character traits with the film-maker’s mother and father, their individual narratives are fictional and allusive, taking us from the countryside of Poland to the streets of East Berlin, from Paris to Yugoslavia, over 15 turbulent years – crossing boundaries that are musical, geographical, political and ultimately existential. The result is a swooning,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cinematographer Witold Sobociński to Receive Camerimage Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Variety
Cinematographer Witold Sobociński to Receive Camerimage Lifetime Achievement Award
Legendary Polish cinematographer Witold Sobociński will be the recipient of the Camerimage Lifetime Achievement Award during the upcoming 26th edition of the International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography, which will be held in Bydgoszcz, Poland, from Nov. 10 to 17.

Sobociński has worked with multiple directors over his long career, including Roman Polanski (1988’s “Frantic”), Andrzej Wajda (1975’s foreign language Oscar-nominated “The Promised Land”) and Piotr Szulkin

“Witold Sobociński is one of the most distinguished Polish cinematographers, and his world-famous camerawork has contributed to over 90 feature films, documentaries, and series,” according to the Camerimage announcement. “The cinematography for one of the first etudes – a film in the style of Italian neorealism, “The Boats Depart At Dawn,” where he illustrated the unity of humans and the elements – brought him international acclaim.”

During his time at the film school, Sobociński was a musician in the legendary jazz band Melomani. It has been
See full article at Variety »

Watching Wajda

The former head of the Polish Film Institute gave me a stunning boxed set of the works of Andrzej Wajda two years ago at the Locarno Film Festival, and I am finally watching them. Most know Wajda is a one of Poland’s preeminent film directors, an Acadmey Award winner, recipeint of an Honorary Oscar, the Palme d’Or, as well as Honorary Golden Lion and Golden Bear Awards, he was a prominent member of the “Polish Film School”. He is best known today for The Promised Land (1975), Man of Iron (1981), and Katyn (2007).

What I learned was that he was born March 6, 1926, Suwałki, Poland the ancestral town of my own ancestors on my paternal grandfather’s side.

Wadja’s first film, A Generation, originally entitled Candidate Term, was by the first post-war generation to leave Lodz Film School who worked with Wajda on his first film. One of those graduates,
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Sally Potter to receive Fipresci 93 award at Poland’s Transatlantyk Festival

Sally Potter to receive Fipresci 93 award at Poland’s Transatlantyk Festival
Previous awardees include Nanni Moretti, Béla Tarr and Andrzej Wajda.

UK writer-director Sally Potter will receive the Fipresci 93 Platinum award at the 8th edition of Transatlantyk Festival to be held in Lodz, Poland from July 13-20.

The festival will also present five of Potter’s films in its Close Up section: Orlando, The Tango Lesson, Yes, Ginger & Rosa and The Party.

Potter directed her first feature film, experimental drama The Gold Diggers, in 1983. She has subsequently directed seven further features, including twice Oscar-nominated Orlando (1992) and last year’s satirical dinner party drama The Party.

The Fipresci 90+ prize celebrates the history
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk (exclusive)

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk (exclusive)
Revered in the 1970s he later became better known as a maker of erotic movies.

Warsaw-based sales outlet New Europe Film Sales has boarded world sales for the documentary Love Express: The Disappearance Of Walerian Borowczyk, which explores the career of controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk, the cult Polish director whose credits include Blanche and Immoral Tales.

The company is launching the film, which was co-produced by HBO Europe, at the Cannes market.

Revered in the 1970s, Borowczyk was hailed as a director of unparalleled sensitivity, before later becoming better known as a maker of erotic movies including Emmanuelle 5. The
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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