News

Second Opinion – My Life as a Courgette (2016)

My Life as a Courgette, 2016.

Directed by Claude Barras.

Featuring the voice talents of Gaspard Schlatter, Sixtine Murat, Paulin Jaccoud and Michel Vuillermoz.

Synopsis:

Courgette is the nick-name given to a nine year old boy by his alcoholic mother. When she dies in an accident, he’s sent to an orphanage, but struggles to find his place among the other children. But new arrival, Camille, offers a first glimpse of hope, as does a kind hearted cop.

Swiss stop motion animation My Life as a Courgette comes with one of the strangest titles of the year, although that’s probably the result of translation. It doesn’t need that additional “A”, because the Courgette of the title is a little boy. His real name is Icare – appropriate, given his love of kite flying – but his abusive, alcoholic mother prefers to call him Courgette. And this tender little story is about
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

U.S. Trailer for ‘My Life as a Zucchini’ Brings Death, Depression, and Healing

Following its Cannes premiere, My Life as a Zucchini emerged as one of the most acclaimed animated films of the year, selected as Sweden’s Best Foreign Language Film entry at the Oscars, as well as making the Academy Awards shortlist of nine films for Best Animated Film, not to mention a Golden Globe nomination for Best Animated Film.

Even if you don’t care about the awards hoopla, I can confirm it’s definitely one to see out. Directed by Claude Barras and scripted by Céline Sciamma (Girlhood), it tells the story of a boy who becomes orphaned after accidentally killing his alcoholic mother. Fear not though as it’s not as depressing as that logline suggests, with Barras crafting a deeply felt tale of healing, even if it feels a tad too short at just over an hour.

We said in our review, “Orphanages conjure up images of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Making a killing by Anne-Katrin Titze

SK1 (L’Affaire SK1) director Frédéric Tellier with David Cronenberg's Videodrome at the IFC Center Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Frédéric Tellier’s intense thriller SK1 (L’Affaire SK1) stars Raphaël Personnaz, Nathalie Baye, Olivier Gourmet, Michel Vuillermoz and Adama Niane. SK1, named for the first serial killer identified through DNA analysis in France, is based on journalist Patricia Tourancheau’s book about the case, Guy Georges: La Traque.

Frédéric spoke with me about his upcoming project with SK1 producer Julien Madon, how Bertrand Tavernier's L.627 and Henri Verneuil's Mélodie En Sous-Sol (Any Number Can Win), starring Jean Gabin and Alain Delon, play a detective role, finding his Guy Georges, the nature of evil and the response of the inspectors involved in the case when they saw the film.

Raphaël Personnaz as Charlie Olivier Gourmet as Bougon: "They need this kind of relief, these bubbles of oxygen sometimes."

Baye is Maître Frédérique Pons,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Movie Review – Life of Riley (2014)

Life of Riley, 2014.

Directed by Alain Resnais.

Starring Sabine Azéma, Hippolyte Girardot, Caroline Silhol, Michel Vuillermoz, Sandrine Kiberlain and André Dussollier.

Synopsis:

George Riley is due to die, forcing his close friends, and ex-lovers, to reflect on their own lives as he comes to the end of his.

This is Alain Resnais’ final film. This is his third adaptation of an Alan Aykbourn play, a different era to his previous exploits within his six-decade canon. Director of art-house classics Hiroshima mon amour and Last Year at Marienbad, Resnais was often ambiguous with his intentions, merging dreams and reality, truth and fiction, throughout his stories. Life of Riley won a Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival (only one month before his death) “for a feature that opens new perspectives”, as it does again create conflict between stage and screen.

Of course, it’s slightly jarring when, fading into England (more specifically,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Life Of Riley Review

Director: Alain Resnais

Cast: Sabine Azema, Hippolyte Girardot, Caroline Sihol, Michel Vuillermoz, Sandrine Kiberlain, Andre Dussollier

Certificate: 12A

Running Time: 108 minutes

Synopsis: A group of friends fast approaching their elder years find out one of them is dying. It soon becomes apparent that the ladies of the group have a particular affinity with the ill George, while them and their husbands try to keep an amateur dramatics play alive.

A French film set in England, adapted from a stage play into a film but shot as a stage play, Life Of Riley could be described as having somewhat of an identity crisis. At 91 years of age, classic French film director Alain Resnais can’t be blamed, and should be celebrated, for still trying to add a bit of uniqueness and experimentation to his films, even if it does feel a bit jumbled.

It’s always a gamble when presenting a film as a play.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Life of Riley | Review

Time to Leave: Alain Resnais’ Elegant Swan Song

Alain Resnais, that reluctant member of the French New Wave, passed away in March of 2014, not quite two months after the premiere of his last film, Life of Riley, at the Berlin Film Festival. Reaching its theatrical release, the film marks a graceful cap to an extraordinary filmography from a director that specialized in fragmented narratives that play with memory, time, perception, and the complicated nature of human interactions. His final film, while certainly more linear than many of his most famous works, is no exception to his exploration of time and the limited amount of it. Returning with several of his favorite key players, it’s the third Resnais adaptation of an Alan Ayckbourn play (originally titled Aimer, boire et chanter, which translates to Love, Drink and Sing), as charming as ever, presented with its stylized stage artifice.

Three couples
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Daily | Nyff 2014 | Alain Resnais’s Life Of Riley

Life of Riley, which premiered in Berlin just weeks before Alain Resnais died at the age of 91 in March, "often behaves like an unofficial stripped-down sequel to the director's You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet," suggests Chuck Bowen at Slant. This "overpoweringly beautiful final film, looks ever onward, daring to push through the ghosts that inhabit the present, standing between the pessimism of an ill-spent past and the optimism of an undefined future." The cast features Resnais's widow, Sabine Azéma, as well as André Dussollier, Sandrine Kiberlain, Hippolyte Girardot, Caroline Sihol and Michel Vuillermoz. We've got the trailer and we're gathering reviews. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Nyff 2014 | Alain Resnais’s Life Of Riley

Life of Riley, which premiered in Berlin just weeks before Alain Resnais died at the age of 91 in March, "often behaves like an unofficial stripped-down sequel to the director's You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet," suggests Chuck Bowen at Slant. This "overpoweringly beautiful final film, looks ever onward, daring to push through the ghosts that inhabit the present, standing between the pessimism of an ill-spent past and the optimism of an undefined future." The cast features Resnais's widow, Sabine Azéma, as well as André Dussollier, Sandrine Kiberlain, Hippolyte Girardot, Caroline Sihol and Michel Vuillermoz. We've got the trailer and we're gathering reviews. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Nyff 2014: With swansong ‘Life of Riley’, Alain Resnais depicts life on the wicked stage

Life of Riley

Written for the screen by Laurent Herbiet and Alain Resnais

Directed by Alain Resnais

France, 2014

Alain Resnais is inarguably one of the most prolific directors to come out of the French New Wave, with nearly 50 films under his belt, including his masterworks Hiroshima, Mon Amour, Last Year at Marienbad, and Night and Fog. Undeterred by age, he seemed to have been working up until the day he died, with his swan song Life of Riley being presented posthumously at this year’s New York Film Festival. Those only familiar with his Nouvelle Vague work will be in for a pleasant surprise: Life of Riley is perhaps more fun that it deserves to be.

Based on the play by Alan Ayckbourn, the film follows two (or three, depending on how you count) couples in the midst of rehearsals for a play, as the news of their friend’s
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Nyff 2014. Main Slate

  • MUBI
Opening Night – World Premiere

Gone Girl

David Fincher, USA, 2014, Dcp, 150m

David Fincher’s film version of Gillian Flynn’s phenomenally successful best seller (adapted by the author) is one wild cinematic ride, a perfectly cast and intensely compressed portrait of a recession-era marriage contained within a devastating depiction of celebrity/media culture, shifting gears as smoothly as a Maserati 250F. Ben Affleck is Nick Dunne, whose wife Amy (Rosamund Pike) goes missing on the day of their fifth anniversary. Neil Patrick Harris is Amy’s old boyfriend Desi, Carrie Coon (who played Honey in Tracy Letts’s acclaimed production of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) is Nick’s sister Margo, Kim Dickens (Treme, Friday Night Lights) is Detective Rhonda Boney, and Tyler Perry is Nick’s superstar lawyer Tanner Bolt. At once a grand panoramic vision of middle America, a uniquely disturbing exploration of the fault lines in a marriage,
See full article at MUBI »

Alain Resnais' "Life of Riley": The Mole's Gaze

  • MUBI
It all begins with a freeze frame of a dirt road somewhere in Yorkshire county, lined with trees whose lush foliage converges above in an arch. What could it be if not a portal? The movie itself, meanwhile, has not even started as we watch the opening credits, encased in large old-fashioned frames, slowly fade away—a device consistently favored by Alain Resnais who opened each of his 19 features likewise, holding off the films themselves until the screen no longer contained any visual surplus. The freeze frame comes to life as the camera pans farther down the road; then we find ourselves in a theatrical set.

We have been here before, of course. Resnais' Smoking/No Smoking, also based on a play by British playwright Sir Alan Ayckbourn, is set in Yorkshire as well. Life of Riley (Aimer, boire et chanter) borrows from the five-hour diptych its theatrical setting, one
See full article at MUBI »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Life of Riley’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Life of Riley’
Only the vivacious die young, notes one character in Alain Resnais’ “Life of Riley,” while “the tiresome, humdrum ones live forever.” But if that’s true, then surely Resnais himself is the exception that proves the rule. Turning for the third time to the work of British playwright Alan Ayckbourn (“Private Fears in Public Places”), whose highly theatrical comedies of manners have made good matches for Resnais’ consuming interest in form as a vessel for character and emotion, “Life” doesn’t find the 91-year-old helmer doing anything he hasn’t done before, but it does find him doing it in ebullient, beautifully stylized fashion, aided by an able-bodied ensemble drawn from his regular corps of traveling players. The result won’t do much to win Resnais new fans, but should easily seduce fests and distribs who have long supported the maverick director’s work.

If Resnais had gone into the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlin completes competition line-up

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin completes competition line-up
Richard Linklater’s Boyhood to compete for the Golden Bear; Beauty and the Beast, starring Vincent Cassel and Léa Seydoux, to play out of competition.

The 64th Berlin International Film Festival (Feb 6-16) has added 15 titles to its Competition programme, completing the line-up of 23 films - of which 20 will vye for the Golden Bear and Silver Bears.

The programme includes 18 world premieres and three feature debuts.

The line-up includes the international premiere of Boyhood, from Before Midnight director Richard Linklater. The film, which will premiere at Sundance, was shot over short periods from 2002 to 2013 and covers 12 years in the life of a family, featuring Mason and his sister Samantha. Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Ellar Coltrane, Lorelei Linklater star.

World premieres include In Order of Disappearance, directed by Hans Petter Moland, which stars Stellan Skarsgård as a snow plough driver whose son’s sudden death puts him in the middle of a drug war between theNorwegian mafia and the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin reveals competition titles

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin reveals competition titles
‘71, Life of Riley and Aloft selected. A Long Way Down, The Turning among Berlinale Special titles.

The first seven films selected for the Berlinale Competition programme include Yann Demange’s ‘71, Alan Resnais’ Life of Riley (Aimer, Boire et Chanter) and Claudia Llosa’s Aloft.

Also joining Wes Anderson’s opening film The Grand Budapest Hotel, and George Clooney’s Monuments Men, both announced in November, are Dominik Graf’s Die Geliebten Schwestern and Yannis Economides’ Stratos.

In the Berlinale Special strand are Pascal Chaumeil’s A Long Way Down, Australian anthology film The Turning, Hubert Sauper’s documentary We Come As Friends (Entente Cordiale) and Dayna Goldfine and Dan Geller’s doc The Galapagos Affair: Satan Came to Eden.

Six of the seven announced main competition titles are world premieres – Monuments Men, which screens out of competition, gets its international premiere.

Chaumeil’s A Long Way Down, starring Pierce Brosnan, Toni Collette, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin Competition to include '71,  Riley, Aloft

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin Competition to include '71,  Riley, Aloft
A Long Way Down, The Turning among Berlinale Special titles.

The first seven films selected for the Berlinale Competition programme include Yann Demange’s ‘71, Alan Resnais’ Life of Riley (Aimer, Boire et Chanter) and Claudia Llosa’s Aloft.

Also joining Wes Anderson’s opening film The Grand Budapest Hotel, and George Clooney’s Monuments Men, both announced in November, are Dominik Graf’s Die geliebten Schwestern and Yannis Economides’ Stratos.

In the Berlinale Special strand are Pascal Chaumeil’s A Long Way Down [pictured], Australian anthology film The Turning, Hubert Sauper’s documentary We Come As Friends (Entente Cordiale) and Dayna Goldfine and Dan Geller’s doc The Galapagos Affair: Satan Came to Eden.

Six of the seven announced main competition titles are world premieres – Monuments Men, which screens out of competition, gets its international premiere.

Chaumeil’s A Long Way Down, starring Pierce Brosnan, Toni Collette, Aaron Paul and Imogen Poots, makes its world
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin Film Festival Reveals Further Competition Pix

Berlin Film Festival Reveals Further Competition Pix
London — The Berlin Film Festival has revealed further titles for its Competition section, as well as pics in its Berlinale Special lineup.

As well as two previously announced titles, George Clooney’s “The Monuments Men,” which plays out of competition, and the fest opener, Wes Anderson’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” the Berlinale has revealed five other Competition section titles.

These are Yann Demange’s “’71″ (pictured), Alain Resnais’ “Aimer, boire et chanter” (Life of Riley), Claudia Llosa’s “Aloft,” Dominik Graf’s “Die geliebten Schwestern” (Beloved Sisters) and Yannis Economides’ “Stratos.”

Thriller “’71″ stars Jack O’Connell — who impressed many with his perf as a troubled youth in “Starred Up” — as a British soldier stranded in a hostile ‘hood in Belfast in 1971.

It is the feature debut from French-born British director Demange, who previously helmed TV drama “Top Boy,” a miniseries about London youth involved in the drugs biz. “Top Boy” was nommed for a BAFTA,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Locarno Film Review: ‘Longwave’

The humor is more than a touch too local in the first half of “Longwave,” though things improve during the second part of Lionel Baier’s comedy about a Swiss Radio crew caught up in Portugal’s 1974 Carnation Revolution. The chameleon-like helmer once again demonstrates his thoroughgoing knowledge of and delight in film history, yet his striving for a 1970s screwball vibe feels too forced and artificial, torn between homage and a wink-wink sensibility. Films Boutique has reported brisk sales for Latin America, and while “Longwave” has scattered moments of genuine amusement, its hyper-localized funny bone isn’t an ideal transplant candidate.

Baier has a healthy sense of humor about his countrymen, given free rein in this farce when an unlikely duo of radio personalities are paired on assignment to report on Swiss investment in Portugal, a country described as “less developed than we are, but still nice.” Julie (Valerie
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Locarno Film Festival 2013: 'Longwave'

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆ Set in 1974, Lionel Baier's Longwave (2013) centres on global broadcasters the Swiss Radio Service. Its French office feels the need for a hit, and that's when its general manager decides to send a troupe to Portugal for a special reportage to investigate Switzerland's aid to poor and developing Southern European countries. The travelling entourage couldn't be more mismatched: Joseph-Marie Cauvin (Michel Vuillermoz), an ageing reporter known for his chauvinistic views and womanising ways, is paired with proto-feminist Julie Dujonc-Renens (Valérie Donzelli), an up-and-coming presenter of all-women programmes.

Stuck between the two primadonnas is quiet soundman Bob (Patrick Lapp), who devoutly sleeps inside his Volkswagen van, surrounded by tape recorders and microphones. The Swiss trio heads to the Portuguese countryside to find out that Swiss money ended up buying the local school clock, faucets that mix hot and cold water, or in putting up a sign for a new housing project that will never be built.
See full article at CineVue »

Locarno 2013. The Question of Vintage, Part 2: Lionel Baier’s “Les grandes ondes (à l’ouest)”

  • MUBI
Lionel Baier is a Swiss filmmaker born in 1975, a teacher and an active cinéphile, the director of many documentaries and features, among them Garçon stupide, a refined fiction with a documentary posture (and something in common with the first films by Alain Guiraudie) and Un autre homme, a film about a film critic (a cousin to Louis Skorecki’s trilogy Les Cinéphiles).

Baier belongs to a generation of filmmakers who had to deal with the fact that they were coming “after.” After their own “masters” or mentors, after their own film culture. After the revolutionary movements of the 60s and 70s. After. A source of political and artistic angst that led to choices spanning from whining nostalgia to merciless caricature, from fake indifference to abstract reconstruction, from respectful tributes to philological or critical questioning.

Baier’s new film is a comedy set in 1974, a straightforward filmic charge against Switzerland's “help
See full article at MUBI »

Film Review: ‘Stand by Love’

It’s going to be a bumpy flight for two ex-lovers who are accidentally seated next to each other on a plane in “Stand by Love,” Alexandre Castagnetti’s glossy, cliched French romantic comedy adapted from a screenplay by Yank thesp-scribe Vincent Angell (2009 TV series “The Beast”). On her way back from New York, an about-to-be-married sculptress, played by a vivacious Ludivine Sagnier, has to spend hours talking with a debonair cad she once dated, prompting a severe case of recurring flashback-itis. Though uneven, the pic should coast to respectable numbers locally and see some offshore action.

A Gotham-set prologue somewhat crudely telegraphs what auds need to know about the characters: Antoine (Nicolas Bedos, in his first starring role) is a handsome but heartless Casanova — he wakes up handcuffed in a sea of empty bottles and nameless babes — and Julie (Sagnier) is a cutesy yet earthy Zooey Deschanel type (except French,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites