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Nyff Adds Special Events, Including Steven Spielberg Documentary, Master Class With Ed Lachman and Vittorio Storaro, and More

Nyff Adds Special Events, Including Steven Spielberg Documentary, Master Class With Ed Lachman and Vittorio Storaro, and More
This year’s New York Film Festival has just unveiled a slew of Special Events to round out its already full-to-bursting lineup, and it includes some late-breaking entries to previously announced sections and a selection of brand new events that are very special indeed. Highlights include a trio of documentary premieres, including Susan Lacy’s “Spielberg” (focused on the eponymous director, with both Lacy and her subject set to appear at the festival), along with Jennifer Lebeau’s Bob Dylan concert film “Trouble No More,” and Susan Froemke’s “The Opera House,” a history of the Metropolitan Opera and a love letter to the art form that will (appropriately enough) screen at the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center.

Other standouts include four brand-new films from Claude Lanzmann, a sparkling new restoration of G.W. Pabst’s “Pandora’s Box.” Elsewhere, Kate Winslet will be on hand for a career-spanning chat
See full article at Indiewire »

Broadway salutes Sam Shepard by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-08-03 12:37:13

Broadway salutes Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Sam Shepard on August 2, 2017 Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In 2010, I attended a dress rehearsal for Sam Shepard's A Lie Of The Mind, directed by Ethan Hawke. Alessandro Nivola, who took on the role Harvey Keitel played in the Eighties, told me that Sam "started offering up new dialogue."

Sam Shepard shared bird rescue and Gregory Corso stories. Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Shepard in 1969 provided a text for Kenneth Tynan's Broadway musical/revue Oh! Calcutta!, which also had contributions from Samuel Beckett, John Lennon and Jules Feiffer. True West came to Broadway with Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C. Reilly in 2000. Gary Sinise and John Malkovich played the brothers in the 1982 Steppenwolf Theatre Company production which was filmed for television.

Buried Child won a Pulitzer in 1979 and the play with Lois Smith was directed by Sinise in 1996.

Fool For Love starred Sam Rockwell and Nina Arianda
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Roman Polanski's Macbeth: a clip from the gory 1971 Shakespeare adaptation – video

Roman Polanski’s adaptation of Macbeth, co-scripted by Kenneth Tynan and starring Jon Finch and Francesca Annis, is arguably the most bloodsoaked one ever – made in the aftermath of his wife Sharon Tate’s murder by the Manson ‘family’. In this clip, we see Finch’s Macbeth fight Macduff (Terence Bayler) in the celebrated ‘untimely ripp’d’ climactic scene. The Tragedy of Macbeth (Criterion Collection) is available now on Blu-Ray

Read Judge John Deeds star Martin Shaw’s account of working on the film

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Roman Polanski's Macbeth: a clip from the gory 1971 Shakespeare adaptation – video

Roman Polanski’s adaptation of Macbeth, co-scripted by Kenneth Tynan and starring Jon Finch and Francesca Annis, is arguably the most bloodsoaked one ever – made in the aftermath of his wife Sharon Tate’s murder by the Manson ‘family’. In this clip, we see Finch’s Macbeth fight Macduff (Terence Bayler) in the celebrated ‘untimely ripp’d’ climactic scene. The Tragedy of Macbeth (Criterion Collection) is available now on Blu-Ray

Read Judge John Deeds star Martin Shaw’s account of working on the film

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Duncan obituary

On Saturday nights in 1962 and 1963 Britain was unexpectedly quiet; people stayed at home to watch the BBC TV satire That Was the Week That Was, called TW3 for short; restaurants installed television sets to retain their clientele. My friend John Duncan, TW3’s assistant producer, who has died aged 78, said that the team played darts in their office till Thursday, wrote the sketches on Friday, rehearsed and performed them live on Saturday, and watched people re-enact them in the pub on Sunday.

John was born in Newcastle; his father, Norman, was an insurance assessor and his mother, Marjorie, taught art. From Newcastle Royal grammar school he went to study English at University College, Oxford, where he produced several plays, notably Tamburlaine the Great – Kenneth Tynan wrote a rave review in the Observer – and worked part time for the National Youth Theatre. On graduating he ran Tomorrow’s Audience, a touring theatre company for schools,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sean Connery, back in Bondage - interview: archive, 28 December 1971

28 December 1971: Tom Hutchinson talks to Sean Connery about his love/hate affair with James Bond

Sean Connery ordered a Perrier water because he had been drinking heavily the night before and, mortal, had not been able to make a James Bond-like with one leap he was free escape from the clutches of the resulting hangover. He watched the elegant back of Kenneth Tynan disappearing into the further recesses of the restaurant. “K-k-kenneth (sic) f-f-fucking T-t-tynan,” he mimicked. “Spends his life criticising plays from a position of lofty principle and then dives into a show like “Oh, Calcutta!” which isn’t half so well presented as Raymond’s Revuebar where I was the other night. Even though the Revuebar champagne is so bloody pricey…

‘Of course the films will go on, but who’ll play me?’

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

75 years ago today: ‘Fantasia’ opened in theaters

  • Hitfix
75 years ago today: ‘Fantasia’ opened in theaters
75 years ago today, Disney took a risk with the opening of its experimental animated film, “Fantasia.” The third feature film made by the House of Mouse, “Fantasia” was released as a limited-run roadshow attraction, starting on November 13, 1940. The New York Times review published the following day declared it to be a film that “really dumps conventional formulas overboard and boldly reveals the scope of films for imaginative excursion.” Images of Mickey Mouse set to music by Paul Dukas, hippos dancing to the tune of Ponchielli, and centaurs and cupids backed by Beethoven have all become iconic in the decades since its release. The film has further secured its pop culture status with “Fantasia” video games, a follow-up feature called “Fantasia 2000,” and with a spot on AFI’s list of the greatest 100 American films. One “Fantasia” segment will soon get the live action treatment: the nightmarish “Night on Bald Mountain
See full article at Hitfix »

Brief Encounter review – 70th anniversary rerelease of David Lean classic

This masterpiece of romantic cinema was conceived in another time and place when sexual repression and self-sacrifice made moral sense, but it’s still a wonderful film

Related: Brief Encounter: is it still relevant at 70?

Brief Encounter is back in cinemas again, this time for the 70th anniversary, and to paraphrase what Ken Tynan said about Look Back in Anger: I doubt if I could love anyone who did not wish to see it, again and again. This is the masterpiece of writer-producer Noël Coward (based on his one-act stage-play Still Life) and a jewel in the filmography of director David Lean – an atypically intimate chamber piece for Lean, yes, but the soaring music of Rachmaninov is where the epic sweep comes in.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Aubrey Morris obituary

Stalwart character actor who appeared as Mr Deltoid in A Clockwork Orange and as one of the gruesome locals in The Wicker Man

In 1957, the character actor Aubrey Morris, who has died aged 89, was praised by Kenneth Tynan for his “mimetic cunning … wreathed in cringing smiles”. Adept at the vaguely camp and suggestively sinister, Morris always left an unconventional stamp on even the smallest, and seemingly conventional, roles. Small and rotund, with gleaming eyes, and occasionally wearing round spectacles, he could convey obsessions and monstrosity at odds with his corporeality. His visual characteristics included a wide smile, which displayed a prominent upper row of teeth, and a sly, sideways glance. With his distinctive, precise speech pattern, he could draw out vowel sounds amusingly, or unnervingly.

A career that lasted for more than 60 years took him from the Old Vic through much British television to Broadway and then Hollywood. One of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New on Video: ‘Ninotchka’ one of the best films from Hollywood’s golden age

Ninotchka

Written by Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder, Walter Reisch

Directed by Ernst Lubitsch

USA, 1939

It’s easy to see why Ninotchka works as well as it does, and why it’s one of the best films from Hollywood’s golden age and of arguably Hollywood’s greatest year. Just look at the talent involved. Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder, and Walter Reisch were all seasoned writers, though with their best work admittedly still to come. Ernst Lubitsch had directed a number of excellent silent films in Germany, had hit the ground running once in Hollywood, making his first American film with no less a star than Mary Pickford (Rosita [1923]), and after a series of charming musical comedies, many with Maurice Chevalier, directed the more sublime and sophisticated comedies for which he now best known, films like Trouble in Paradise (1932) and Design for Living (1933). While this was happening, Greta Garbo was working
See full article at SoundOnSight »

"The Shop On Main Street" 50th Anniversary Screening, June 9, Encino, CA

  • CinemaRetro
Ján Kadár and Elmar Klos’s 1965 film The Shop on Main Street, which was the first film from Eastern Europe to win an Academy Award, celebrates it’s 50th anniversary this year. The Laemmle Town Center 5 in Encino, CA will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 128-minute drama on Tuesday, June 9, 2015 at 7:30 pm. Scheduled to appear in person are film director Ivan Passer and Michal Sedlacek, Consul General of Czech Republic in Los Angeles.

From the press release:

The Shop On Main Street (1965) was the first film from Eastern Europe ever to win an Academy Award. Fifty years ago this powerful Czech drama won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language film. Directed by Ján Kadár and Elmar Klos, it was one of the key films in the Czech New Wave that flourished in the 1960s, before the Soviet invasion of 1968 stamped out this vital movement. Josef Kroner
See full article at CinemaRetro »

John Osborne on Film: The Entertainer

Part I. Anger, Suez and Archie Rice

“There they are,” George Devine told John Osborne, surveying The Entertainer‘s opening night audience. “All waiting for you…Same old pack of c***s, fashionable assholes. Just more of them than usual.” The Royal Court had arrived: no longer outcasts, they were London’s main attraction.

Look Back in Anger vindicated Devine’s model of a writer’s-based theater. Osborne’s success attracted a host of dramatists to Sloane Square. There’s Shelagh Delaney, whose A Taste of Honey featured a working-class girl pregnant from an interracial dalliance; Harold Pinter’s The Room, a bizarre “comedy of menace”; and John Arden’s Serjeant Musgrave’s Dance, which aimed a Gatling gun at its audience. Devine encouraged them, however bold or experimental. “You always knew he was on the writer’s side,” Osborne said.

Peter O’Toole called the Royal Court actors “an
See full article at SoundOnSight »

John Osborne on Film: Look Back in Anger

I. The Landmine

In August 1955, George Devine, director of London’s Royal Court Theatre, ventured to meet a promising writer, living on a Thames houseboat. “I had to borrow a dinghy… wade out to it and row myself to my new playwright,” he recalled. Thus began a partnership between Devine, who sought to rescue the English stage from stale commercialism, and the 26 year old tyro, John Osborne. Together, they’d revolutionize modern theater.

Born in London but raised in Stoneleigh, Surrey, Osborne lost his father at age 12, resented his low-born mother and was expelled from school for striking a headmaster. While acting for Anthony Creighton’s repertory company, his mercurial temper and violent language appeared. In 1951 he wed actress Pamela Lane, only to divorce six years later. Osborne soon immortalized their marriage: their cramped apartment, with invasive friends and intruding in-laws, John and Pamela’s pet names and verbal abuse,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Pendas Fen: a lasting vision of heresy and pastoral horror

Following in the footsteps of The Wicker Man, David Rudkins 1974 TV play offers a powerful portrait of adolescence and religious anguish in rural England

I am afflicted by images, by things that are seen, pictures of things, dramatist and screenwriter David Rudkin told an interviewer in 1964. They are extraordinary, momentary, but they stay with me. He was talking about his play Afore Night Come (1962), which led Kenneth Tynan to proclaim: Not since Look Back in Anger has a playwright made a debut more striking than this. But its also true of Pendas Fen, an unforgettable hybrid of horror story, rites-ofpassage spiritual quest and vision of an alternative England that has been hailed as one of the most original and vauntingly ambitious British films of the last half century.

Originally broadcast in 1974 as part of the BBCs Play for Today strand, and directed by Alan Clarke, who would later become celebrated
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

London Stage Star and Olivier Henry V Leading Lady Asherson Dead at Age 99

'Henry V' Movie Actress Renée Asherson dead at 99: Laurence Olivier leading lady in acclaimed 1944 film (image: Renée Asherson and Laurence Olivier in 'Henry V') Renée Asherson, a British stage actress featured in London productions of A Streetcar Named Desire and Three Sisters, but best known internationally as Laurence Olivier's leading lady in the 1944 film version of Henry V, died on October 30, 2014. Asherson was 99 years old. The exact cause of death hasn't been specified. She was born Dorothy Renée Ascherson (she would drop the "c" some time after becoming an actress) on May 19, 1915, in Kensington, London, to Jewish parents: businessman Charles Ascherson and his second wife, Dorothy Wiseman -- both of whom narrowly escaped spending their honeymoon aboard the Titanic. (Ascherson cancelled the voyage after suffering an attack of appendicitis.) According to Michael Coveney's The Guardian obit for the actress, Renée Asherson was "scantly
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Macbeth' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

Macbeth was the first film Roman Polanski made following the murder of his wife, Sharon Tate, and friends at the hands of the Manson family. At the time he'd been working on the sci-fi thriller The Day of the Dolphin, which would later be made by Mike Nichols. It was during a skiing trip arranged by Victor Lownes, a subsequent producer of the film, Polanski made the decision Macbeth would be his next film. It was a decision he made feeling his next film "should be something serious, not a comedy... something with some depth." Polanski would team with Kenneth Tynan to write the screenplay and, thanks to urging from Lownes, Hugh Hefner and Playboy would eventually serve as the film's producer after no one else would touch it. As Polanski notes in an included 60-minute documentary on this new Criterion Blu-ray release, to that point there had only been
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

New on Video: ‘Macbeth’

Macbeth

Written by Roman Polanski and Kenneth Tynan

Directed by Roman Polanski

UK, 1971

Following the success of Rosemary’s Baby in 1968, and prior to what is arguably still his greatest film, Chinatown (1974), Roman Polanski made three curious filmmaking choices. One was the international coproduction and rarely discussed What? (1972), one was the racing documentary Weekend of a Champion (1972), and the third, which actually came before these two, was Macbeth (1971). It is obviously not that a Shakespearean adaptation in itself is unusual, but rather that it so seemingly diverted from the films that were garnering the young Polanski his worldwide acclaim: taut thrillers like The Knife in the Water (1962), Repulsion (1965), Cul-De-Sac (1966), and Rosemary’s Baby. Yet in Macbeth, there are a number of characteristic Polanski touches — in story and style — harkening back to these previous works and in many ways pointing toward those to come.

Don’t be fooled by the Playboy
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Jon Voight on His First Acting Experience in Sketch Comedy

Jon Voight on His First Acting Experience in Sketch Comedy
It’s hard to imagine a better match of actor and role than Jon Voight as Ray Donovan’s manipulative ex-con father in Showtime’s family drama. But the Emmy nominee (and Oscar winner) admits that his first acting experience was a bit of a tougher fit: doing sketch comedy (“O, Oysters”) in a Village jazz club in the ’60s — though it did earn him his first Variety mention.

Do you remember that review in Variety?

Yes, I do! They didn’t completely destroy us. They said Jon Voight is pleasant. At least they didn’t say I was completely out of place. I looked like I was 14 years old working with those very talented performers.

Tell me about the show.

It was really a jazz club. Art D’Lugoff wanted to have a show for his girlfriend. At that time I was cleaning out my father (financially) and just
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Jon Voight on His First Acting Experience in Sketch Comedy

Jon Voight on His First Acting Experience in Sketch Comedy
It’s hard to imagine a better match of actor and role than Jon Voight as Ray Donovan’s manipulative ex-con father in Showtime’s family drama. But the Emmy nominee (and Oscar winner) admits that his first acting experience was a bit of a tougher fit: doing sketch comedy (“O, Oysters”) in a Village jazz club in the ’60s — though it did earn him his first Variety mention.

Do you remember that review in Variety?

Yes, I do! They didn’t completely destroy us. They said Jon Voight is pleasant. At least they didn’t say I was completely out of place. I looked like I was 14 years old working with those very talented performers.

Tell me about the show.

It was really a jazz club. Art D’Lugoff wanted to have a show for his girlfriend. At that time I was cleaning out my father (financially) and just
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Macbeth (1971)

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Sept. 23, 2014

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Jon Finch is Macbeth

In Macbeth, Roman Polanski (Rosemary’s Baby) imbues his unflinchingly violent adaptation of William Shakespeare’s tragedy of ruthless ambition and murder in medieval Scotland with grit and dramatic intensity.

Jon Finch (Frenzy) and Francesca Annis (Dune) are charged with fury and sex appeal as a decorated warrior rising in the ranks and his driven wife, scheming together to take the throne by any means.

Co-adapted by Polanski and the great theater critic and dramaturge Kenneth Tynan, and shot against a series of stunning, stark British Isle landscapes, this version of Macbeth is among the most atmospheric and authentic of all Shakespeare films.

Criterion’s DVD and Blu-ray editions of Macbeth contain the following features:

• New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed stereo soundtrack on the Blu-ray

• New documentary about the making of the film, featuring interviews with director Roman Polanski,
See full article at Disc Dish »
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