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Why can't women time travel?

From The Terminator to Back to the Future to Richard Curtis's new film About Time, movies love time travel – but it's strictly for men. Anna Smith wishes she could turn back the clock

Poor Rachel McAdams. Three time-travel movies and not a whiff of the action. First was 2009's The Time Traveller's Wife, in which Eric Bana played a Chicago librarian darting through time while his on-screen wife McAdams plodded on faithfully in the present. Then, two years later, came Midnight in Paris. Owen Wilson got to party in the roaring 1920s every day of his holiday, while oblivious fiancee McAdams went sightseeing. And now Richard Curtis's new film, About Time, sees McAdams stay home as her partner Domhnall Gleeson goes time-travelling in secret, in a bid to change his past and have a better future. This time it's a gift – passed down the male line of the family.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

R.I.P Satoshi Kon (1963-2010)

This is a sad bit of news, I've just learned about the passing of Satoshi Kon - an important Japanese anime filmmaker who gave us Millennium Actress, Tokyo Godfathers, and Paprika (from which was the last time we met with the filmmmaker). In honor of the filmmaker and his fans, we are republishing this sit down with Kon originally published May 24th in 2007. ---- Paprika is the latest feature length work from Japanese anime auteur Satoshi Kon (Tokyo Godfathers, Paranoia Agent, Millennium Actress), and adapted from a novel by Japan’s most renowned science fiction author Yasutaka Tsutsui. The plot centers around an experimental invention called the DC Mini, that allows its users to enter another person’s dreams. 29 year old Dr. Atsuko Chiba is a brilliant but conservative research psychotherapist working on the DC Mini project, and also uses the device to moonlight as super heroine Paprika, entering into
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

'Paprika' Meets 'Inception' in This Mash-Up Trailer

From the moment we learned that Christopher Nolan's Inception would deal with a machine that allowed people to enter the dreams of others, anime fans have been comparing it to Satoshi Kon's highly regarded film Paprika. Based on a novel by Yasutaka Tsutsui, Paprika is a story about a research psychologist who can use a machine to enter other people's dreams. Nolan bashers have halfheartedly latched on to the similarities when arguing that the filmmaker is overrated and not particularly original (which is largely a matter of personal opinion ... ), and there are definite similarities between the two tales.

Those common elements are even more noticeable -- and funny -- in this fan-made YouTube trailer for Paprika's Inception. In this clever mash-up, Paprika's images are matched with the Inception soundtrack and voice-over narration. The level of synchronicity between the two is pretty amazing. I've never heard Nolan talk about Paprika,
See full article at Cinematical »

Wolfgang Petersen Talks Live-Action Paprika

In an interview with MTV Splash Page, director Wolfgang Petersen talked about his plans for the announced live-action adaptation of Yasutaka Tsutsui’s novel Paprika that Japanese director Satoshi Kon and Studio Madhouse turned into an amazing anime in 2006.

Petersen praises Kon’s adaptation and states that an yet unnamed author is currently working on the adaptation but a screenplay hasn’t been written yet. Unfortunately, he also mentions something that always leaves a bad taste in my mouth when it comes to Hollywood adaptations:

We open it up a little bit more so it’s more accessible for a wide audience, but it comes a little bit sort of “Matrix” feel. [...] Not like Matrix but sort of the size of it all, the scope of it all. So that it becomes more of a film for a mainstream audience.

[via Quiet Earth]
See full article at Affenheimtheater »

Wolfgang Peterson Talks About His Live-Action Adaptation of Paprika

Yasutaka Tsutsui's novel Paprika has already been adapted into animation by Satoshi Kon, but back in August of last year it was announced that a live-action feature version would be directed by Wolfgang Peterson. Now Peterson has issued a brief update on the adaptation, and he sounds like he's planning for it to be big, if nothing else. MTV talked to Peterson, who loved the anime telling of the story, and says that he's got a very detailed treatment in hand that, if given the signal to move forward, should generate a script quickly. Peterson says, We open it up a little bit more so it’s more accessible for a wide audience, but it comes a little bit sort of "Matrix" feel. Not like Matrix but sort of the size of it all, the scope of it all. So that it becomes more of a film for a mainstream audience.
See full article at Slash Film »

Wolfgang Petersen's Live-Action 'Paprika' Adaptation Is On 'The Fast Track'

Wolfgang Petersen proved he had an eye for the fantastic with 1984's "The Neverending Story," but the imagery in the source material for his live-action "Paprika" adaptation may take him into scenes that look more like "Akira" or David Cronenberg's "Scanners." The "Troy" and "Poseidon" director loved "Paprika" as an anime, and the treatment he recently received could become a wide release that he compares to "The Matrix."

"We have a young writer on it, and he just delivered a very specific and detailed treatment that we’re working on," Petersen told MTV News. "And then if that’s a go then he will write the screenplay and that will go very fast because the treatment is already very detailed. So I’m very excited about that. I would say it’s on the fast track."

The "Paprika" story, which originally began as a 1993 novel by Yasutaka Tsutsui, but
See full article at MTV Splash Page »

Wolfgang Petersen to do a live-action Paprika?

According to Moviehole, Wolfgang Petersen (yes, “our man in Hollywood”) is developing a live-action film based on Yasutaka Tsutsui’s novel Paprika that director Satoshi Kon already adapted into an anime in 2006. Not a bad idea in my eyes, since the basic theme of the novel (dreams meet reality thanks to technology) could work really well in live-action even though I could imagine that combining reality with the dream world would be much harder (and probably less “real”) using CGI.

But why Wolfgang Petersen? I know that he already did Sci-Fi but the man didn’t produce anything spectacular for at least 20 years…

Here’s the title song The Girl in Byakkoya by Susumu Hirasawa (available for download here) from the 2006 anime:
See full article at Affenheimtheater »

Wolfgang Peterson To Direct Live-Action Film of Paprika?

Previously adapted into a truly splendid feature by anime master Satoshi Kon, Yasutaka Tsutsui's serialized novel Paprika seems set for the big screen again. This time round, we can expect a live action adaptation by Wolfgang Peterson, the perpetrator of Air Force One and Outbreak. The novel's story is a chase mystery revolving around a new technology that allows people to enter one another's dreams, so there's little wonder that Moviehole (via Firstshowing) invoke the director's NeverEnding Story in their rumor-starting piece. What I don't quite get is their assertion that this project would be Petersen "ostensibly out to court the youngsters again." I guess they don't really know the project at all. Is psychotherapy and psychosexual nightmare manipulation typically the stuff of kiddie fare? Kon's film is definitely an adult picture. Let's not get tangled up in knots over Petersen but instead focus on the source material. There
See full article at Slash Film »

Neverending Story Director Enters Paprika.s Dreams

Wolfgang Petersen has made quite a name for himself by having such a cool name. I mean, come on, the dude.s name is Wolfgang. A Wolfgang sounds like something Twilight needs more of (think: characters from Stand and Deliver, but werewolves). Ever since making one of the greatest children.s. stories of all time (The Neverending Story), it's been all downhill for Peterson. Maybe that means he should get back into kids movies, but instead he's adapting anime. Moviehole reports that Petersen will be adapting Yasutaka Tsutsui.s Paprika, a novel about a female therapist who must find a stolen machine that allows one enter someone.s dreams. The book has already been adapted as an anime once, back in 2006. This has the potential to be a pretty cool thriller, and all Wolfgang needs to do is get a decent special effects department to handle some sweet dream sequences.
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Wolfgang Petersen Directing a Live-Action Paprika Remake?

Where has he been hiding? Wolfgang Petersen, the other German action movie director (not Roland Emmerich), hasn't directed anything since Poseidon back in 2006. He's attached to an alien movie called Uprising at Sony, but there hasn't been any movement on that for a while (as far as I know). Moviehole is reporting (without many details at all) that Petersen is attached to direct a live-action version of Yasutaka Tsutsui's Japanese novel Paprika. Anime enthusiasts may remember that an anime version of the book was produced in 2006. But a big anime remake just doesn't seem like something Wolfgang would do? Paprika is about a machine that allows therapists to enter their patient's dreams. When the machine is stolen, all hell breaks loose, and only a young female therapist can stop it: Paprika. Apparently it is a very trippy anime (watch the trailer) because it spends so much time in dreams.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Does Peterson Have a Taste for 'Paprika'?

Wolfgang Peterson, who directed The NeverEnding Story in 1984, is revisiting the fantasy genre. However, the results might be a little spicier this time.

Moviehole reports the German filmmaker, who has also helmed action-dramas like Das Boot and Air Force One, is developing a live-action adaptation of Paprika, based on a 1993 novel by Yasutaka Tsutsui. Originally serialized in Marie Claire, Paprika concerns an experimental machine that allows therapists to enter the dreams of their patients. When several prototypes are stolen, it’s up to a young therapist, Paprika, to stop a series of murders by entering the dream world herself.

If the title sounds familiar, you might have picked up one of several manga adaptations, or seen the animated film of the same name, which was released by Sony in 2006. The movie, directed by Satoshi Kon, has been praised for its visual style and integration of 2-D and 3-D animation.

No
See full article at CinemaSpy »

‘Paprika’ novel gets an English translation this April!

We’re big fans of Satoshi Kon’s animated film Paprika and today we have found reason to rejoice! The 1993 novel that this animated wonder was based on by author Yasutaka Tsutsui has been translated into English and will be available through Alma Books in the UK this April.

When prototype models of a device for entering into patients dreams go missing at the Institute for Psychiatric Research, it transpires that someone is using them to manipulate people s dreams and send them insane. Threatened both personally and professionally, brilliant psychotherapist Atsuko Chiba has to journey into the world of fantasy to fight her mysterious opponents. As she delves ever deeper into the imagination, the borderline between dream and reality becomes increasingly blurred, and nightmares begin to leak into the everyday realm. The scene is set for a final showdown between the dream detective and her enemies, with the subconscious as their battleground,
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Minoru Kawasaki Collection: Review of The World Sinks Except Japan

Year: 2006

Release date: DVD (R1) Nov. 18th, 2008

Director: Minoru Kawasaki

Writers: Minoru Kawasaki & Masakazu Migita & Yasutaka Tsutsui (novel)

IMDb: link

Trailer: link

Amazon link: link

Review by: Kevin Ouellette

Rating: 6 out of 10

Japan has sort of faded into the background of the world consciousness in the past few years. Aside from the typical “crazy Japan” pop culture stories that seem to never get old for some, the western world seems to ignore the existence of this once larger-than-life nation. Gone is the fear of superior Japanese products killing the Us manufacturing sector—we’ve since come to terms with that as an unfortunate inevitability—and gone are the icy relations that existed when old men that still remembered World War II were running our respective countries. All we really have left is a shared military and a mutual fascination with each other’s entertainment industries. So what would happen if
See full article at QuietEarth »

Opening This Week

  • IFC
By Neil Pedley

On offer this week is a veritable gallery of the eclectic and the eccentric as M. Night Shyamalan goes R-rated, Edward Norton goes green, Werner Herzog goes to the Antarctic, and two of Herzog's fellow countrymen go to California to climb a big rock very, very quickly.

"Beauty in Trouble"

Czech director Jan Hrebejk and writer Petr Jarchovský continue their longtime collaborative partnership with this dense ensemble drama loosely inspired by Robert Graves's poem of the same name. This time, the duo who balanced humor with drama in the Oscar-nominated Holocaust-set "Divided We Fall," turn to the devastating series of floods that swept Prague in 2002, and tell the story of Marcela (Anna Geislerová), an overworked mother of two living in squalor. When her ne'er do well husband is taken in by the police, she's courted by a well-to-do businessman (Josef Abrhám) and Marcela is forced to
See full article at IFC »

Interview: Satoshi Kon

[/link] is the latest feature length work from Japanese anime auteur Satoshi Kon (Tokyo Godfathers, Paranoia Agent, Millennium Actress), and adapted from a novel by Japan’s most renowned science fiction author Yasutaka Tsutsui. The plot centers around an experimental invention called the DC Mini, that allows its users to enter another person’s dreams. 29 year old Dr. Atsuko Chiba is a brilliant but conservative research psychotherapist working on the DC Mini project, and also uses the device to moonlight as super heroine Paprika, entering into her patient’s dreams and helping them resolve anxiety and neurosis.When one of the DC Mini prototypes is stolen, Atsuko is forced into the role of a real-world heroine as her colleagues begin to go mad, haunted by terrifying waking-dreams of a doll torn from the mind of a schizophrenic patient. Someone is wielding the device as a weapon, and setting the
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Paprika: One Sheet & Trailers

[/link] know who Satoshi Kon is and have been waiting a couple of full moons for his latest release. Selected as part of the 63rd Venice International Film Festival the anime opens in New York on May 25, 2007 and Los Angeles on June 1, 2007, before expanding nationwide throughout the summer. Today, Sony Pictures Classics has passed on the one sheet and trailers below.Paprika is from an original story written by Yasutaka Tsutsui and based on the screenplay by Seishi Minakami & Satoshi Kon, Dr. Atsuko Chiba is a genius scientist by day, and a kick-ass dream warrior named Paprika by night. In this psychedelic sci-fi adventure, it will take the skills of both women to save the world...The near future: a revolutionary new psychotherapy treatment called Pt has been invented. A device called the "DC Mini" is able to act as a "dream detective
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

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