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Universal unleashes the Classic Monsters with The Legacy Collection

As Universal Pictures prepares to launch its shared Monster universe with the upcoming release of The Mummy, the studio has opened the vault and unleashed the Classic Monsters with the release of the Legacy Collections, four Blu-ray box-sets for The Mummy, Frankenstein, Dracula and The Wolf Man, which features 27 classic movies, 22 of which have never been released on Blu-ray before.

Here’s the full product details for these rather fantastic collections…

The Mummy Legacy Collection

The Mummy (1932)

Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy* (1955)

The Mummy’s Hand* (1940)

The Mummy’s Tomb* (1942)

The Mummy’s Ghost* (1944)

The Mummy’s Curse* ((1944)

Special Features

The Mummy Feature Commentary with Film Historian Paul Jensen

– Mummy Dearest Featurette

– He Who Made Monsters: The Life and Art of Jack Pierce

Universal Horror (narrated by Kenneth Branagh)

– Unraveling the Legacy of the Mummy

The Frankenstein Legacy Collection

Frankenstein (1931)

Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Son of Frankenstein* (1939)

– Ghost of Frankenstein
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

This Week’s Wamg Podcast – Fantastic Beasts, Loving, and More!

This week’s episode of our podcast We Are Movie Geeks The Show is up! Hear Wamg’s Jim Batts and Tom Stockman talk movies. Our guest in the studio this week is Lynn Venhaus, film critic for The Belleville News Democrat and the Kirkwood/Webster Times. We’ll discuss the weekend box office and review Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them, Billy Lynn’S Long Halftime Walk and Loving. We’ll also recap the St. Louis International Film Festival and pay tribute to the late Robert Vaughn and Lupita Tovar.

Here’s this week’s show. Have a listen:

http://www.wearemoviegeeks.com/wp-content/uploads/wamg-11-21-54.mp3

The post This Week’s Wamg Podcast – Fantastic Beasts, Loving, and More! appeared first on We Are Movie Geeks.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rip: Lupita Tovar & Robert Vaughn

Didn't mean to let these two farewells slip by.

After the death of Luise Rainer, Lupita Tovar held the title of 'The Oldest Living Screen Star of Note' for a few years. She died Sunday at the 106 years of age so here's to enduring genes. The Mexican actress's original claim to fame was starring in the Spanish version of the famous horror picture Dracula (1931). Though her last movie was in 1945 she continued to affect the movies via her gene pool...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Newswire: R.I.P. Lupita Tovar, Mexican star of Hollywood’s golden age

Lupita Tovar, the 1930s film actress who starred in the acclaimed Spanish-language version of Dracula and the first Mexican talkie, Santa, has died. She was 106.

Born the oldest of nine in a poor and very religious household in a small town in the southernmost part of Mexico, Tovar moved with her family to Mexico City in the later years of the Mexican Revolution. It was there, as a teenager studying dance and gymnastics, that she was discovered by Robert Flaherty, the docu-fiction film pioneer who directed Nanook Of The North and Man Of Aran. At the time, Flaherty was preparing his collaboration with F.W. Murnau, Tabu: A Story of the South Seas, and he wanted Tovar for the lead role. However, after coming to Hollywood, she ended up signing a contract with Fox; Tovar would later claim that this was an attempt by the studio to get back ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Lupita Tovar Dies: Mexican-American Actress Who Starred In Spanish-Language Version Of ‘Dracula’ Was 106

Lupita Tovar Dies: Mexican-American Actress Who Starred In Spanish-Language Version Of ‘Dracula’ Was 106
Lupita Tovar, a groundbreaking Mexican-American actress who starred in the 1931 Spanish-language Dracula and in 1932’s Santa, one of Mexico’s first narrative sound films, died Friday in Los Angeles. The 106-year-old former actress was a matriarch to an enduring Hollywood dynasty that includes grandsons Chris and Paul Weitz, the film directors and writers, and entertainment attorney Alex Kohner of Morris Yorn in La. Granddaughter Melissa Kohner is a clinical psychologist…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Lupita Tovar, Actress in Spanish-Language Version of ‘Dracula,’ Dies at 106

Lupita Tovar, Actress in Spanish-Language Version of ‘Dracula,’ Dies at 106
Lupita Tovar, a Mexican-born actress who played a historic role in the country’s cinema and starred in the Spanish-language version of “Dracula,” died Saturday. She was 106.

Her niece, Lucy Tovar, confirmed the news on Facebook. The Washington Post reports that she died in her Los Angeles home.

Tovar was widely considered Hollywood royalty, and not only for her own impact in Mexican cinema. She was married high-powered Hollywood producer Paul Kohner, and became the matriarch to a family that was involved in the entertainment industry for generations. Her daughter, Susan Kohner, received an Oscar nomination for her role in “Imitation of Life” in 1959, and her grandsons, Chris and Paul Weitz, co-directed such movies as “American Pie” in 1999 and “About a Boy” in 2002.

Tovar was discovered by talent scouts at the age of 16, and would go on to appear in a handful of films in the silent era. Once the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Leon Russell, Rock and Roll Hall Of Famer, Dies at 74

  • The Wrap
Leon Russell, Rock and Roll Hall Of Famer, Dies at 74
Rock singer and songwriter Leon Russell died in Nashville on Sunday at the age of 74. His wife stated on his website that he died in his sleep. Russell had a heart attack in July. The musician worked with the likes of The Rolling Stones, Amy Winehouse, Joe Cocker, George Harrison, Bob Dylan and The Temptations. Also Read: 'Dracula' Actress Lupita Tovar Dies at 106 Russell’s career spanned more than five decades. As a teenager he began playing in Tulsa, Oklahoma clubs with his group the Starlighters, which also included guitarist J.J. Cale. He moved to Los Angeles in the late 1950s and.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Dracula’ Actress Lupita Tovar Dies at 106

  • The Wrap
‘Dracula’ Actress Lupita Tovar Dies at 106
Mexican screen siren Lupita Tovar has died at the age of 106. The actress starred in the 1931 Spanish-language version of “Dracula,” which was filmed simultaneously with the popular English-speaking version with Bela Lugosi. Tovar died in her Los Angeles home on Saturday, according to a Facebook post by actress Lucy Tovar, her niece. Tovar was the mother of Oscar-nominated “Imitation of Life” actress Susan Kohner and the grandmother to Hollywood film writers, brothers Chris Weitz and Paul Weitz. Both were nominated for an Oscar for writing 2002’s “About a Boy.” More to come…
See full article at The Wrap »

Cinema’s Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood

Banished by Josef Goebbels and threatened by the Reich, the creative core of the German film industry found itself in sunny Los Angeles, many not speaking English but determined to carry on as writers, directors and actors. More than simply surviving, they made a profound impact on Hollywood moviemaking. Cinema's Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 2009 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 117 min. / Street Date April 12, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Cinematography Joan Churchill, Emil Fischhaber Film Editor Anny Lowery Meza Original Music Peter Melnick Written, Produced and Directed by Karen Thomas

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Cinema's Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood is the perfect docu to introduce people to the way film and world history are intertwined... and also to generate interest in older movies and classic cinema. Instead of a story about the making of movies, it's about a fascinating group of filmmakers forced to abandon
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Lupita Tovar, Actress in the Spanish-Language Version of 1931's 'Dracula,' Dies at 106

Lupita Tovar, Actress in the Spanish-Language Version of 1931's 'Dracula,' Dies at 106
Lupita Tovar, the Mexican actress who starred in the 1931 Spanish-language version of Dracula that was shot concurrently with the famed Bela Lugosi version, has died. She was 106. Tovar died Saturday, her niece, actress Lucy Tovar, said on Facebook. Several Mexican news outlets reported that she died in Los Angeles. Lupita Tovar’s daughter is Susan Kohner, who earned an Oscar nomination for portraying the young woman who rejects her black mother (Juanita Moore) and tries to pass herself off as white in the 1959 Douglas Sirk melodrama Imitation of Life. Other survivors include her grandchildren Chris Weitz and

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

National Film Registry: A Sirk, Some Ghostbusters, and Zorro

Nooooo. I almost forgot to share the National Film Registries new titles. Each year they add 25 pictures  that are deemed historically, culturally or aesthetically important. Each year I suggest that we should watch all the titles together. Well, the ones we can find at least. Perhaps we'll actually do that for 2016 -- you never know! Getting a spot on the National Film Registry is more symbolic than active. It does not guarantee preservation or restorations but it does suggest that these films should all be preserved and/or restored.

The 2015 additions are:

 

Edison Kinetoscopic Record of a Sneeze (1894) - watch it now. it's six seconds long... the earliest surviving copyrighted film Dream of a Rarebit Fiend (1906) -watch it now. (7 minutes) from a short Winsor McCay comic strip A Fool There Was (1915) -watch it now. (66 minutes) Theda Bara tempts a married man! It's always the woman's fault, don't you know  Humoresque
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Imitation of Life,’ ‘Being There,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ and More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2004, they’ve now reached 675 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2015 list, which includes classics such as Douglas Sirk‘s melodrama Imitation of Life, Hal Ashby‘s Being There, and John Frankenheimer‘s Seconds. Perhaps the most popular picks, The Shawshank Redemption, Ghostbusters, Top Gun, and L.A. Confidential were also added. Check out the full list below.

Being There (1979)

Chance, a simple-minded gardener (Peter Sellers) whose only contact with the outside world is through television, becomes the toast of the town following a series of misunderstandings. Forced outside his protected environment by the death of his wealthy boss, Chance subsumes his late employer’s persona,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections
Ghostbusters,” “Top Gun,” “L.A. Confidential” and “Being There” are among the Library of Congress’ 2015 selections for the National Film Registry.

Each year, the Library of Congress adds 25 notable films to its permanent collection, ensuring that the titles will be preserved for generations to come. The 2015 class is typically eclectic, ranging from silent films to 1980s blockbusters, edgy indies to educational films such as the Disney-produced 1946 entry “The Story of Menstruation.”

“Selecting a film for the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to cinema and America’s cultural and artistic history,” said acting Librarian of Congress David Mao. “The registry is an invaluable way to advance public awareness of the richness, creativity and variety of our nation’s film heritage.”

The 2015 selections bring the number of titles in the registry to 675. The films are selected by Library of Congress staffers and the National Film Preservation Board, after reviewing nominations made
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Interview: Actor Sam Elliott, Director Paul Weitz Visit ‘Grandma’

Chicago – Actor Sam Eliott will make you smile. The distinctive voice, his famous mustache and his character presence in a film or TV show increases any potential in the production. He recently was in Chicago with director Paul Weitz, as they teamed up in the film “Grandma,” starring the incomparable Lily Tomlin.

Grandma” has a very unique premise. Tomlin is the title character of Elle, who is visited by her granddaughter Sage (Julia Garner). The girl is seeking an abortion, and her feminist poet grandmother seems like the right fellow traveler on her way to the procedure. Sam Elliott portrays Karl, Elle’s ex-husband – she left him for a same sex partner – who harbors a resentment toward circumstances in their relationship. The two meet along the way to the clinic, and the resentment boils to the surface.

Lily Tomlin and Sam Elliott in ‘Grandma

Photo credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Sam Elliott
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Cinema Centenarians: Among Oldest Film People Still Around Are Best Actress Oscar Winner; Actress with, gasp, Twilight Connection

Oldest person in movies? (Photo: Manoel de Oliveira) Following the recent passing of 1931 Dracula actress Carla Laemmle at age 104, there is one less movie centenarian still around. So, in mid-June 2014, who is the oldest person in movies? Manoel de Oliveira Portuguese filmmaker Manoel de Oliveira will turn 106 next December 11; he’s surely the oldest person — at least the oldest well-known person — in movies today. De Oliveira’s film credits include the autobiographical docudrama Memories and Confessions / Visita ou Memórias e Confissões (1982), with de Oliveira as himself, and reportedly to be screened publicly only after his death; The Cannibals / Os Canibais (1988); The Convent / O Convento (1995); Porto of My Childhood / Porto da Minha Infância (2001); The Fifth Empire / O Quinto Império - Ontem Como Hoje (2004); and, currently in production, O Velho do Restelo ("The Old Man of Restelo"). Among the international stars who have been directed by de Oliveira are Catherine Deneuve, Pilar López de Ayala,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Two "Dracula" Actresses

The Los Angeles Times reports that one of the last remaining silent era actors has passed away. The actress in question, Carla Laemmle, had an easy in to the movies: her uncle Carl Laemmle founded Universal Studios and invited her family to live in a bungalow on the lot.  Carla only had a small part in the horror classic Dracula (1931) but a key one: she uttered the first line of dialogue. She didn't appear in many pictures in her long life, dying at 104 years of age, but she apparently just recently filmed a role in a new horror film Mansion of Blood (2014) starring Gary Busey.

In happier news - this is not a double Rip -  Lupita Tovar, a Mexican beauty who starred in the Spanish language version of Dracula that same year (in those early days of sound they made simultaneous alternative versions for other markets with the same
See full article at FilmExperience »

Oscar-Nominated Actress Featured in One of Universal's Biggest Blockbusters Dead at 99

Oscar-nominated ‘Imitation of Life’ actress Juanita Moore has died Juanita Moore, Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee for the 1959 blockbuster Imitation of Life, died on New Year’s Day 2014 at her home in Los Angeles. According to various online sources, Juanita Moore (born on October 19, 1922) was 91; her step-grandson, actor Kirk Kahn, said she was 99. (Photo: Juanita Moore in the late ’50s. See also: Juanita Moore and Susan Kohner photos at the 50th anniversary screening of Imitation of Life at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.) Juanita Moore movies The Los Angeles-born Juanita Moore began her show business career as a chorus girl at New York City’s Cotton Club. According to the IMDb, Moore was an extra/bit player in a trio of films of the ’40s, including Vincente Minnelli’s all-black musical Cabin in the Sky (1942) and Elia Kazan’s socially conscious melodrama Pinky (1949), in which Jeanne Crain plays a (very,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

How Kimberly Peirce Brought 'Carrie' Back to Life

Taking on a classic is a gutsy move, even for an award-winning filmmaker. And when director Kimberly Peirce signed on to re-imagine Stephen King's horror classic "Carrie," about a teenage girl with telekinetic powers hellbent on revenge, she knew she had some sky-high expectations to meet.

"I'd make a joke and say, 'I didn't give a f*ck,' but of course I felt pressure!" she told us recently while doing press for "Carrie." "But I think pressure is good."

All that pressure had Peirce thinking long and hard about what it would mean to sign on to a project of this scale, with its history and existing fan base. Having made just one film, 2008's "Stop-Loss," since her 1999 directorial debut, "Boys Don't Cry," it's clear, as a filmmaker, she doesn't make decisions lightly.

"I walked into this feeling a huge responsibility, much like I did with 'Boys Don't Cry
See full article at Moviefone »

Frank Fouce Jr., Pioneer of Spanish-Language U.S. TV, Dies at 85

Frank Louis Fouce, a pioneer of Spanish-language entertainment in the U.S. and a founder of what later became Univision, died Sept. 22 in Los Angeles of lymphoma. He was 85.

He founded Spanish International Communications Corp. in 1961 with his father, Frank Fouce Sr., and others. Frank Jr. served as president and chairman of the Board of Sicc, the first group of Spanish-language and Uhf television stations in the U.S., which later became Univision when it was bought by Hallmark. The first station of the group was Kwex-tv channel 41 in San Antonio. Fouce also served as president of Kmex-tv channel 34 in Los Angeles.

Fouce, who began his career in early Hollywood as an assistant director at Hal Roach Studios and also worked at Bing Crosby Enterprises and on “Fireside Theater,” was an impresario for 25 years, producing vaudeville shows at his Spanish International Theaters, including L.A.’s Million Dollar and Mayan venues,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Once a Star Always a Star: Turner's Scandals on TCM

Lana Turner movies: Scandal and more scandal Lana Turner is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" star today, Saturday, August 10, 2013. I’m a little — or rather, a lot — late in the game posting this article, but there are still three Lana Turner movies left. You can see Turner get herself embroiled in scandal right now, in Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life (1959), both the director and the star’s biggest box-office hit. More scandal follows in Mark Robson’s Peyton Place (1957), the movie that earned Lana Turner her one and only Academy Award nomination. And wrapping things up is George Sidney’s lively The Three Musketeers (1948), with Turner as the ruthless, heartless, remorseless — but quite elegant — Lady de Winter. Based on Fannie Hurst’s novel and a remake of John M. Stahl’s 1934 melodrama about mother love, class disparities, racism, and good cooking, Imitation of Life was shown on
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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