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The weirdest Oscars nominees ever – ranked!

On the eve of the 90th Academy Awards, we celebrate the unlikeliest red-carpet-walkers, including Robert Towne’s dog, several people who don’t actually exist and … Jean-Paul Sartre

10. Hermione Baddeley: best supporting actress nominee, Room at the Top

It took just over two minutes of screen time for Baddeley to nab a nomination for her work in Jack Clayton’s 1959 drama. The current holder of the title for smallest amount of screen time resulting in an actual prize is Beatrice Straight, who won in the same category in 1977 for a performance in Network totalling just under six minutes.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

2018 Oscars: Will one film sweep both actress awards for the 11th time?

2018 Oscars: Will one film sweep both actress awards for the 11th time?
If our combined Oscar odds are correct, the Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress categories will be dominated by the stars of three films: Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf of “Lady Bird”; Margot Robbie and Allison Janney of “I, Tonya”; and Sally Hawkins and Octavia Spencer of “The Shape of Water.” And if one pair of co-stars wins, it’d be the 11th time both actress awards went to the same film.

The best chance of this happening is with Ronan and Metcalf. The former sits in second place in lead, behind “Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing Missouri” star Frances McDormand, with 7/2 odds, while her onscreen mother is the favorite in supporting with 11/5 odds.

But after defeating Metcalf at the Golden Globes and Critics’ Choice, Janney is watching her stock rise quickly. She stands at 5/2 odds, while her onscreen daughter, Robbie, is in fifth in lead with 8/1 odds.

See Will ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Howard Gottfried, ‘Network’ Producer, Dies at 94

Howard Gottfried, ‘Network’ Producer, Dies at 94
Howard Gottfried, who received an Oscar nomination as producer of the 1976 media satire “Network,” died of a stroke Friday in Los Angeles. He was 94.

Gottfried also partnered with “Network” writer Paddy Chayefsky on films including “Altered States” and “The Hospital.” He met Chayefsky as a regular in a New York card game, and the two started on their first project, “The Hospital.” Gottfried met the film’s lead, George C. Scott, when Gottfried served as his divorce attorney.

Chayefsky won the best screenplay Oscar for “Network,” which also won Oscars for Faye Dunaway, Peter Finch and Beatrice Straight. Finch’s character, irate news anchor Howard Beale, was named for Gottfried.

Raised in the Bronx, Gottfried started his career as a lawyer and became involved in off-Broadway theater. He then went to United Artists, where he oversaw TV series such as “Gilligan’s Island,” “The Patty Duke Show” and “The Fugitive.” Gottfried later moved
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Howard Gottfried, Producer on 'Network' and 'Altered States,' Dies at 94

Howard Gottfried, Producer on 'Network' and 'Altered States,' Dies at 94
Howard Gottfried, the Oscar-nominated producer who teamed with famed screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky on Network, The Hospital and Altered States, has died. He was 94.

Gottfried suffered a stroke and died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his daughter, Norah Weinstein, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Gottfried earned his Academy Award nomination for producing Sidney Lumet's Network (1976), which did not win the best picture trophy but did take four Oscars — for Chayefsky and actors Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight — amid its 10 noms.

The producer was...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Howard Gottfried, Producer on 'Network' and 'Altered States,' Dies at 94

Howard Gottfried, the Oscar-nominated producer who teamed with famed screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky on Network, The Hospital and Altered States, has died. He was 94.

Gottfried suffered a stroke and died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his daughter, Norah Weinstein, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Gottfried earned his Academy Award nomination for producing Sidney Lumet's Network (1976), which did not win the best picture trophy but did take four Oscars — for Chayefsky and actors Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight — amid its 10 noms.

The producer was...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Oscars: What Should Have Won – Network over Rocky for Best Picture

Graeme Robertson on why Network should have won Best Picture at the 49th Academy Awards…

The Oscars celebrating the best of 1976 were a rarity, in that, almost all of the nominees for Best Picture are truly excellent and have gone on to become celebrated classics.

While Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky ultimately triumphed against its formidable competition, I feel, despite loving Rocky and the franchise it spawned, that it perhaps didn’t deserve to be named as Best Picture of 1976.

To me, the award should have gone to the brilliant razor sharp media satire that is Network.

Network follows the exploits of TV network Ubs and the complete and utter breakdown of its long-standing news anchor Howard Beale, who at has just been told he is to be fired in two weeks due to increasingly dwindling viewing figures.

Left on by his ratings-hungry bosses for his final broadcasts, Beale manages to
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Oscars 2017: Michelle Williams in ‘Manchester by the Sea’ — How Rare Is a Nom Or Win For Short Screen Times?

Manchester by the Sea’ (Courtesy: Amazon Studios)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

A fourth chance at an Oscar is right around the corner for Michelle Williams — despite how little screen time the actress racked up in Manchester by the Sea. Should the stars align, Williams will score a best supporting actress nomination at the 2017 ceremony. After you hear just how little of the film featured the 36-year-old, it might shock you — but let us just assure you that this isn’t a new accomplishment.

This site’s namesake, The Hollywood Reporter’s Scott Feinberg, lists Williams as a frontrunner in the best supporting actress category this year alongside Viola Davis (Fences), Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Nicole Kidman (Lion), and Greta Gerwig (20th Century Women). The Montana-born actress has already scored three Oscar nominations: in the best supporting actress category for 2005’s Brokeback Mountain as well as in the best actress category
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Rod Serling’s ‘Patterns’

Is this Rod Serling's best teleplay ever? Van Heflin, Everett Sloane and Ed Begley are at the center of a business power squeeze. Is it all about staying competitive, or is it corporate murder? With terrific early performances from Elizabeth Wilson and Beatrice Straight. Patterns Blu-ray The Film Detective 1956 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 83 min. / Street Date September 27, 2016 / 14.99 Starring Van Heflin, Everett Sloane, Ed Begley, Beatrice Straight, Elizabeth Wilson, Joanna Roos, Valerie Cossart, Eleni Kiamos, Ronnie Welsh, Shirley Standlee, Andrew Duggan, Jack Livesy, John Seymour, James Kelly, John Shelly, Victor Harrison, Sally Gracie, Sally Chamberlin, Edward Binns, Lauren Bacall, Ethel Britton, Michael Dreyfuss, Elaine Kaye, Adrienne Moore. Cinematography Boris Kaufman Film Editors Dave Kummis, Carl Lerner Art Direction Richard Sylbert Assistant Director Charles Maguire Written by Rod Serling Produced by Michael Myerberg Directed by Fielder Cook

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Let me roll off the titles of some 'fifties 'organization
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Oscar Hopeful Trailers Galore

Chris here. As the upcoming fall festival and Oscar season looms, get ready for a steady stream of incoming footage for this year's hopefuls to start cropping up in the coming weeks. Today we have some peeks at a few weepies ready to work your tear ducts on their path to awards: Manchester By The Sea, A United Kingdom, and Lion. Take a look at the trailers (and a few quick thoughts) below:

Manchester By The Sea

Kenneth Lonergan is definitely returning to You Can Count On Me territory after the intellectual meanderings of Margaret, with already raved about results.

• Isn't Kyle Chandler in this? Obviously new star Lucas Hedges will be the supporting Oscar play here, but when will the always strong Chandler finally get his due?

• I've read Michelle Williams performance compared to Beatrice Straight in Network several times. Looks like we'll have a brief spellbinder of a performance.
See full article at FilmExperience »

CinemaCon: ‘Birth of a Nation,’ ‘La La Land’ Stand Out in Blockbuster Fray

CinemaCon: ‘Birth of a Nation,’ ‘La La Land’ Stand Out in Blockbuster Fray
Las Vegas — A day after 20th Century Fox announced it would be releasing Warren Beatty’s as-yet-untitled Howard Hughes film in partnership with New Regency later this year, the studio took over the Colosseum at Caesars Palace to show off its upcoming slate. But amid the blockbuster noise of hotly anticipated titles like “X-Men: Apocalypse” and “Independence Day: Resurgence,” it was a prestige drama from subsidiary Fox Searchlight that truly stood out from the fray.

Searchlight acquired Nate Parker’s “The Birth of a Nation” out of Sundance for a hefty price tag of $18 million in January, so the specialty division needs it to be a hit. Part of that deal stipulated that an educational roadshow component be provided, whereby Parker will travel with the film and speak to its story and themes. All the more reason, then, for this to be Searchlight’s first year presenting at CinemaCon, to get exhibitors on board.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 25 greatest Oscar speeches

  • Hitfix
The 25 greatest Oscar speeches
We're just a week away from another gold-tinged year of speeches, upsets, and snubs. After all the hype, what ends up mattering about the Oscars? I'd argue it's the speeches, and that's why we're picking the 25 best acceptance speeches ever -- by actors only. Sorry, but glamor is a key element in any Oscar moment and I don't have time to remember if the guy who adapted The Last Emperor thanked his mom.  25. Dustin Hoffman, Kramer vs. Kramer Dustin Hoffman's seriousness initially seems worrisome, but his mix of sarcasm and sincerity is right for the ceremony.  24. Marion Cotillard, La Vie en Rose Cotillard's tearful speech makes you realize how rare it is than an Oscar recipient is surprised to win. As Cotillard scrambles to make sense of the honor, she comes up with an ebullient finale: "Thank you, life! Thank you, love! It is -- there are some angels in this city.
See full article at Hitfix »

One Scene is All it Takes to Win an Oscar For Certain Actresses

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

The amount of screen time an actor has in a film is by no means an indicator of Oscar success. Sometimes one impactful scene is all it takes for the Academy to take notice and reward a performer with a statuette.

This year there are a number of powerful performances that take place in just one scene’s worth of screen time, and Academy history has a few examples that should bolster those actors hopes for nominations and, possibly, even wins.

In Youth, Jane Fonda plays an aging actress with a bit of a mean streak. Her presence on screen is barely longer than five total minutes, but the impression it left with fans at the Toronto International Film Festival this year was significant. In one brief scene she verbally assaults a director (Harvey Keitel) she has known throughout her career, leaving a lasting impact
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Jane Fonda Makes the Most of Limited Screen Time in ‘Youth’, Hopes to Join Past Supporting Actress Noms with Short Performances

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

On Saturday evening in Galeta, Calif., legendary actress Jane Fonda was awarded with the 10th Annual Kirk Douglas Award for Excellence in Film at the 31st Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

The 77-year-old actress has won two best actress Oscars in her decades-long career, but has not received a nomination in 28 years. This year, however, she has been generating major Oscar buzz for a supporting actress nomination after a short, but very strong, performance in director Paolo Sorrentino‘s Youth, in which she plays an aging movie star.

Fonda’s role in the film is hardly more than a cameo, with her screen time barely exceeding five minutes, and yet that could be enough for her to earn a best supporting actress nomination. Limited screen time does not necessarily bar an actress from the Oscars, and a few performances that are even shorter than Fonda
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Will Jon Hamm finally win an Emmy thanks to new voting rules?

  • Hitfix
Will Jon Hamm finally win an Emmy thanks to new voting rules?
Emmy prediction is usually a fool's game, because who could ever predict something like Jeff Daniels from "The Newsroom" beating Bryan Cranston, Jon Hamm, Kevin Spacey, and Damian Lewis? At least in previous years, the brave prognosticator could at least lean on the knowledge that the voters in each category have actually watched the submitted episode or episodes, and try to make decisions accordingly. This doesn't always work (Hamm didn't win for "The Suitcase"), but with Daniels, for instance, you could at least understand that people liked his delivery of the speech about how America's no longer the greatest country in the world. (See also James Spader's multiple Emmy wins for delivering David E. Kelley position paper-style monologues.) That requirement to watch the episodes is about the only way that Cranston was able to win his first Emmy, given how few people were watching "Breaking Bad" at the time, and
See full article at Hitfix »

Telluride film festival: 'Suffragette' showcases Carey Mulligan as Oscar contender

Telluride film festival: 'Suffragette' showcases Carey Mulligan as Oscar contender
Sarah Gavron's historical drama "Suffragette" had its world premiere at the Telluride film festival on Friday. That marked the only stateside showing for this film about the struggle of women to win the right to vote in early 20th century Britain before it opens the London filmfest on Oct. 7. This Focus Features release, which stars Carey Mulligan as a young firebrand, is due out here on Oct. 23.  -Break- While Mulligan's character, Maud Watts, is a composite of several women involved in the movement, others in the cast play key real-life figures. Meryl Streep makes the most of her few minutes on-screen as Emmeline Pankhurst, who inspired generations of women to fight for their right to vote. Could she reap her 20th Oscar nomination for such a short role? When it comes to Streep and the Oscars, anything is possible. Remember, Beatrice Straight ("Network") won the Supporting Actress award back
See full article at Gold Derby »

The original ‘Poltergeist’ successfully blends horror and family melodrama

Poltergeist

Written by Michael Grais, Steven Spielberg, and Mark Victor

Directed by Tobe Hooper

The original 1982 Poltergeist, directed by Tobe Hooper, opens with an apt image: an extreme close-up of a television set. Not only does the object prove pivotal to the film’s narrative, but the close proximity of the camera to the screen imbues the television with a strange, almost alien quality. Though it simply plays the national anthem over patriotic imagery, the signature sign-off for most TV stations in the 1980s, the close-up distorts the pictures and renders them wholly indeterminable. For a film that explores the dark unknowns that lie beneath the seemingly innocent and ordinary, Poltergeist certainly knows how to prime its audience for what’s to come.

As the channel transitions to the familiar static blizzard, five-year-old Carol Anne Freeling (Heather O’Rourke) awakens to the sound of voices emanating from the set. As
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Poltergeist: How Tobe Hooper Deconstructed the American Dream & Fueled My Childhood Nightmares

This summer, a brand new vision of Poltergeist will arrive in theaters everywhere and terrify a whole new generation of fans. While I’m going to reserve my judgments on just how that version is going to fare until I see it on May 22nd, I thought this made for a perfect time to revisit Tobe Hooper’s original film, which has remained one of my favorite horror movies for over three decades and is still one of the greatest and most effective haunted house films of all time.

The first time I saw Poltergeist, I was only 5 years old and, suffice to say, my childhood was forever changed on that fateful day. Growing up, I was raised by a single mom and we lived in a trailer park, so I guess I always viewed families with both parents who could afford to live in a "real" home as individuals
See full article at DailyDead »

'Poltergeist' Poster: This Clown Will Scare You!

'Poltergeist' Poster: This Clown Will Scare You!
After a number of trailers and TV spots, it's quite clear that the iconic clown from the original 1982 horror classic Poltergeist is responsible for one of this remake's biggest scares. A new poster has arrived for the new haunted house thrill ride, and it showcases the not-so-funny doll cracking an evil grin before it leaps off the toy shelf with its cruel intentions. Don't be afraid, it's only a movie!

Legendary filmmaker Sam Raimi takes over from Steven Spielberg as producer on Poltergeist, with director Gil Kenan stepping in for original director Tobe Hooper. Together, they bring a contemporized spin on this legendary tale about a family whose suburban home is haunted by evil forces. When the terrifying apparitions escalate their attacks and hold the youngest daughter captive, the family must come together to rescue her before she disappears forever.

20th Century Fox and MGM will release Poltergeist this summer,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Blu-ray Review – Network (1976)

Network, 1976.

Directed by Sidney Lumet.

Starring Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Robert Duvall, Peter Finch, Ned Beatty, Wesley Addy, Cindy Grover, Beatrice Straight and Ken Kercheval.

Synopsis:

When a news anchorman threatens to kill himself on air the corporate bodies find every way they can to exploit his rantings for ratings.

It’s amazing to think that in the course of nearly 40 years, despite all the advances we have made in the world, not a lot really changes. And one watch of Network, Sidney Lumet’s 1976 satirical drama about corporate greed in the face of human tragedy, is enough to convince you that the goalposts may move and people may come and go but the almighty dollar is still king.

You only have to watch a Saturday evening of prime time television here in the UK to see that the situations and people depicted in Network aren’t that far-fetched, with
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Top 100 Horror Movies: How Truly Horrific Are They?

Top 100 horror movies of all time: Chicago Film Critics' choices (photo: Sigourney Weaver and Alien creature show us that life is less horrific if you don't hold grudges) See previous post: A look at the Chicago Film Critics Association's Scariest Movies Ever Made. Below is the list of the Chicago Film Critics's Top 100 Horror Movies of All Time, including their directors and key cast members. Note: this list was first published in October 2006. (See also: Fay Wray, Lee Patrick, and Mary Philbin among the "Top Ten Scream Queens.") 1. Psycho (1960) Alfred Hitchcock; with Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam. 2. The Exorcist (1973) William Friedkin; with Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Jason Miller, Max von Sydow (and the voice of Mercedes McCambridge). 3. Halloween (1978) John Carpenter; with Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Pleasence, Tony Moran. 4. Alien (1979) Ridley Scott; with Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, John Hurt. 5. Night of the Living Dead (1968) George A. Romero; with Marilyn Eastman,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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