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The King and Four Queens

Clark Gable is still sufficiently frisky in this late career western to attract four well-chosen frontier women -- who in this case happen to be a quartet of robbers' wives, sitting on a rumored mountain of ill-gotten gains. Raoul Walsh abets the comedy-drama, as Gable's fox-in-a-henhouse tries to determine which hen can lead him to the promised golden eggs. The King and Four Queens Blu-ray Olive Films 1956 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 86 min. / Street Date May 24, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Clark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet, Jean Willes, Barbara Nichols, Sara Shane, Roy Roberts, Arthur Shields, Jay C. Flippen. Cinematography Lucien Ballard Production Design Wiard Ihnen Film Editor Howard Bretherton Original Music Alex North Written by Richard Alan Simmons, Margaret Fitts from her story Produced by David Hempstead Directed by Raoul Walsh

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Olive's latest dip into MGM's United Artists holdings brings up the cheerful, not particularly
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John Wayne in The Quiet Man at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning March 12th

“Two women in the house – and one of them a redhead!”

The Quiet Man (1952) is one of Hollywood’s most beloved movies and you’ll have a chance to see it on the big screen at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater next weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 12th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. Admission is only $5.

John Ford’s flamboyant tribute to Irish-Americans, The Quiet Man may be full of all-too-familiar Irish stereotypes, ranging from a fondness for spirits to the love of a good fight, but it’s delivered with great skill and broad humor and at its heart is a good-natured, old-fashioned romance. The action takes place in Sea Verge (Ireland), around 1933 and tells the story of “Sean Thornton” (John Wayne), “a quiet peace loving man come home from America”, He’s a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Walker on TCM: From Shy, Heterosexual Boy-Next-Door to Sly, Homosexual Sociopath

Robert Walker: Actor in MGM films of the '40s. Robert Walker: Actor who conveyed boy-next-door charms, psychoses At least on screen, I've always found the underrated actor Robert Walker to be everything his fellow – and more famous – MGM contract player James Stewart only pretended to be: shy, amiable, naive. The one thing that made Walker look less like an idealized “Average Joe” than Stewart was that the former did not have a vacuous look. Walker's intelligence shone clearly through his bright (in black and white) grey eyes. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” programming, Turner Classic Movies is dedicating today, Aug. 9, '15, to Robert Walker, who was featured in 20 films between 1943 and his untimely death at age 32 in 1951. Time Warner (via Ted Turner) owns the pre-1986 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer library (and almost got to buy the studio outright in 2009), so most of Walker's movies have
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Criterion Collection: The River | Blu-ray Review

Criterion repackages Jean Renoir’s 1951 classic The River for Blu-ray, one of the master filmmaker’s several titles in the collection (fans may recall that Renoir’s Grand Illusion was the very first Criterion title). A title significant in many respects, being the first Technicolor film in India and Renoir’s first color feature, it’s simplistic beauty has gone on to influence future generations of filmmakers, including its prominently vocal champion Martin Scorsese. It also served as a launching pad for Satyajit Ray, who worked as an assistant on the film, and who would go on to create his own stunning debut four years later with the first chapter of his Apu trilogy, Pather Panchali (1955).

We experience the childhood of Harriet (Patricia Walters) in retrospect, her off-screen adult voice recounting one particular stretch of time while growing up in India with her mother (Nora Swinburne) and father (Esmond Knight
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

John Wayne in The Quiet Man at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning March 14th

“Two women in the house – and one of them a redhead!”

The Quiet Man (1952) is one of Hollywood’s most beloved movies and you’ll have a chance to see it on the big screen at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater next weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 14th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. Admission is only $5.

John Ford’s flamboyant tribute to Irish-Americans, The Quiet Man may be full of all-too-familiar Irish stereotypes, ranging from a fondness for spirits to the love of a good fight, but it’s delivered with great skill and broad humor and at its heart is a good-natured, old-fashioned romance. The action takes place in Sea Verge (Ireland), around 1933 and tells the story of “Sean Thornton” (John Wayne), “a quiet peace loving man come home from America”, He’s a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Mickey Rooney and Liz Taylor in National Velvet at The Hi-Pointe Saturday May 10th

“Some day you’ll learn that greatness is only the seizing of opportunity – clutching with your bare hands ’til the knuckles show white!”

MGM, America’s starriest studio during the Second World War, managed to reach perfection in its writing, music, attitude, and above all the acting performances of its young stars in 1944’s National Velvet. 12-year old Elizabeth Taylor (as Velvet), Jackie Jenkins (as little brother Donald, with his insect necklace), willowy 19-year old Angela Lansbury (as boy-mad older sister Edwina), and 24-year old Mickey Rooney (as Mi Taylor, the jockey with a past, bubbling with resentment of the world), are all outstanding.

The story is a simple and far-fetched one: Velvet Brown dreams of horses, owning them, training them, winning them. Naturally when the chance comes to win a problem horse in a raffle she has to go for it; from here on in, she’s set on
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

John Wayne in The Quiet Man at The Hi-Pointe Saturday March 8th

“Two women in the house – and one of them a redhead!”

The Quiet Man (1952) is one of Hollywood’s most beloved movies and you’ll have a chance to see it on the big screen at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater next weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 8th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. Admission is only $5.

John Ford’s flamboyant tribute to Irish-Americans, The Quiet Man may be full of all-too-familiar Irish stereotypes, ranging from a fondness for spirits to the love of a good fight, but it’s delivered with great skill and broad humor and at its heart is a good-natured, old-fashioned romance. The action takes place in Sea Verge (Ireland), around 1933 and tells the story of “Sean Thornton” (John Wayne), “a quiet peace loving man come home from America”, He’s a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

All-American Dad at His Movie Best as the All-American Crook

Fred MacMurray movies: ‘Double Indemnity,’ ‘There’s Always Tomorrow’ Fred MacMurray is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" today, Thursday, August 7, 2013. Although perhaps best remembered as the insufferable All-American Dad on the long-running TV show My Three Sons and in several highly popular Disney movies from 1959 to 1967, e.g., The Absent-Minded Professor, Son of Flubber, Boy Voyage!, MacMurray was immeasurably more interesting as the All-American Jerk. (Photo: Fred MacMurray ca. 1940.) Someone once wrote that Fred MacMurray would have been an ideal choice to star in a biopic of disgraced Republican president Richard Nixon. Who knows, the (coincidentally Republican) MacMurray might have given Anthony Hopkins a run for his Best Actor Academy Award nomination. After all, MacMurray’s most admired movie performances are those in which he plays a scheming, conniving asshole: Billy Wilder’s classic film noir Double Indemnity (1944), in which he’s seduced by Barbara Stanwyck, and Wilder
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Forget Hitchcock's Vertigo: Tonight the Greatest Movie About Obsessive Desire

Joan Fontaine movies: ‘This Above All,’ ‘Letter from an Unknown Woman’ (photo: Cary Grant, Joan Fontaine in ‘Suspicion’ publicity image) (See previous post: “Joan Fontaine Today.”) Also tonight on Turner Classic Movies, Joan Fontaine can be seen in today’s lone TCM premiere, the flag-waving 20th Century Fox release The Above All (1942), with Fontaine as an aristocratic (but socially conscious) English Rose named Prudence Cathaway (Fontaine was born to British parents in Japan) and Fox’s top male star, Tyrone Power, as her Awol romantic interest. This Above All was directed by Anatole Litvak, who would guide Olivia de Havilland in the major box-office hit The Snake Pit (1948), which earned her a Best Actress Oscar nod. In Max Ophüls’ darkly romantic Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948), Fontaine delivers not only what is probably the greatest performance of her career, but also one of the greatest movie performances ever. Letter from an Unknown Woman
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Two Must-See Disasters as Parker Series Continues (She Turns 91 in Two Days)

Eleanor Parker 2013 movie series continues today (photo: Eleanor Parker in Detective Story) Palm Springs resident Eleanor Parker is Turner Classic Movies’ Star of the Month of June 2013. Thus, eight more Eleanor Parker movies will be shown this evening on TCM. Parker turns 91 on Wednesday, June 26. (See also: “Eleanor Parker Today.”) Eleanor Parker received her second Best Actress Academy Award nomination for William Wyler’s crime drama Detective Story (1951). The movie itself feels dated, partly because of several melodramatic plot developments, and partly because of Kirk Douglas’ excessive theatricality as the detective whose story is told. Parker, however, is excellent as Douglas’ wife, though her role is subordinate to his. Just about as good is Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee Lee Grant, whose career would be derailed by the anti-Red hysteria of the ’50s. Grant would make her comeback in the ’70s, eventually winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

John Wayne in The Quiet Man at The Hi-Pointe This Saturday

“Two women in the house – and one of them a redhead!”

The Quiet Man (1952) is one of Hollywood’s most beloved movies and you’ll have a chance to see it on the big screen at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 9 at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. Admission is only $5.

John Ford’s flamboyant tribute to Irish-Americans, The Quiet Man may be full of all-too-familiar Irish stereotypes, ranging from a fondness for spirits to the love of a good fight, but it’s delivered with great skill and broad humor and at its heart is a good-natured, old-fashioned romance. The action takes place in Sea Verge (Ireland), around 1933 and tells the story of “Sean Thornton” (John Wayne), “a quiet peace loving man come home from America”, He’s a boxer
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

John Wayne in The Quiet Man at The Hi-Pointe Saturday March 9th

“Two women in the house – and one of them a redhead!”

The Quiet Man (1952) is one of Hollywood’s most beloved movies and you’ll have a chance to see it on the big screen at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater next weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 9 at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. Admission is only $5.

John Ford’s flamboyant tribute to Irish-Americans, The Quiet Man may be full of all-too-familiar Irish stereotypes, ranging from a fondness for spirits to the love of a good fight, but it’s delivered with great skill and broad humor and at its heart is a good-natured, old-fashioned romance. The action takes place in Sea Verge (Ireland), around 1933 and tells the story of “Sean Thornton” (John Wayne), “a quiet peace loving man come home from America”, He’s a boxer
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Forgotten: Pagan Rhythms

  • MUBI
Acknowledging Apache Drums (1951) as the forgotten Val Lewton movie, we must also acknowledge that it's not quite as special as Cat People or Isle of the Dead or any of the others in the chiller cycle, but it does bear comparison with the lesser-known Mademoiselle Fifi and it certainly beats the pants off of Youth Runs Wild.

If the conservative nature of the western format reins in some of Lewton's more sophisticated tendencies, it also allows others to stand out in bold relief, and if director Hugo Fregonese is no Jacques Tourneur, nor even a Mark Robson, he's a perfectly amicable journeyman.

Admitting a certain B-movie banality, what's striking is how Lewton is able to continue his preoccupations into what might seem an alien genre, so that Apache Drums resembles, at numerous times, a supernatural/psychological horror movie, in which the horror is dually located in the American Indian "other,
See full article at MUBI »

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