News

Leo Award nominations

Big congrats to all the Leo nominees this year!

The nominations were announced earlier today. Sanctuary, Arctic Air, Endgame and Blackstone are up for Best Dramatic Series and all five films nominated for Best Feature Length Drama have familiar faces in them: Daydream Nation (Luke Camilleri, Calum Worthy, Genevieve Buechner), Doppelgänger Paul (Ben Cotton), Marilyn (Ryan Robbins), Sisters & Brothers (Kacey Rohl, Michael Eklund, Ben Cotton), and The Odds (Calum Worthy).

Sisters & Brothers nabbed 12 nominations, Hamlet (with Peter Wingfield) and Marilyn have eight each, Sunflower Hour (with Kacey Rohl and Ben Cotton) has seven, Donovan's Echo (with Hiro Kanagawa) has six, Daydream Nation and Doppelgänger Paul five each, The Odds has four, and Everything and Everyone (with Ryan Robbins) and Hannah's Law (with Ryan Kennedy and John Pyper-Ferguson, to be aired in June) scored two each.

On the TV side, Sanctuary is way ahead of the pack with 18 nominations, followed by
See full article at CapricaTV »

Trailer of 'Father & Sons'

The trailer of one of Canadian director Carl Bessai's latest films, Fathers & Sons, is now online.

This film is a spin-off of the film Mothers and Daughters , a comedy that deals with the relation some women have with their mom. In Fathers & Sons, women are replaced by men, and mothers, by fathers.

Here's the description of the story according to the studio behind the film, Raven West:

A middle-aged Jewish man meets his father for the first time at the funeral of his mother. A south-asian accountant introduces his white fiance to his father - a gay, bollywood choreographer. A recently bankrupted wall street broker has come home to borrow money from his music teacher father, and four brothers gather at the paternal home to pay their last respects and to collect their inheritance.

The film stars Stephen Lobo, Manoj Sood, Tyler Labine, Vincent Gale, Hrothgar Mathews, Tom Scholte,
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Line-Up of Canadian Films at the Festival du nouveau cinéma

Yesterday, Montreal's Festival du nouveau cinéma (Fnc), which will take place from October 13 to 24, revealed its full line-up of films. Nineteen Canadian feature films and documentaries will be presented. However, don't expect to see all films that were screened at the latest Toronto or Vancouver International Film Festivals.

Opening film:

10 1/2

Director: Daniel Grou (Podz)

Starring: Claude Legault, Robert Naylor and Albert Kwan

International selection

Jo pour Jonathan

Director: Maxime Giroux

Starring: Jean-Sébastien Courchesne, Raphaël Lacaille, Jean-Alexandre Létourneau and Vanessa Pilon

Focus Québec/Canada

A Night for Dying Tigers

Director: Terry Miles

Starring: Jennifer Beals, Gil Bellows, Lauren Lee Smith, Tygh Runyan, Kathleen Robertson, John Pyper-Ferguson, Leah Gibson, Sarah Lind and Jessica Heafey

Affinity Point

Director: Deeh

Starring: Danielle Hubbard, Jason D. Pitre, Sophie Ricard and Yann Faussurier

2 fois une femme

Director: François Delisle

Starring: Evelyne Rompré, Marc Béland and Catherine de Léan

Falardeau (Documentary)

Director: German Gutierrez and Carmen Garcia
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Last Wedding

"Last Wedding" is a movie about male/female relationships -- bad male/female relationships. It's not about anything else, so after 100 minutes you'll either want to get divorced or throw a cooked chicken at writer-director Bruce Sweeney. The latter proves to be an effective weapon one woman uses against her husband, so that's not as far-fetched as it sounds.

This Canadian film, selected as the opening-night gala for the Toronto Film Festival, has secured Canadian distribution, but theatrical chances elsewhere look grim.

Sweeney, making his third film, proves adept at constructing scenes of brutal emotional violence: Scenes where couples push all the right buttons to tear each other apart. Yet in each instance, he fails to provide an underlying reason for the over-the-top dysfunction.

The three couples at the center of the movie individually suffer from career pressures, petty jealousies and general dissatisfaction with life. Yet why these troubles spill over into their romantic relationships to such a poisonous degree is never clear.

The movie starts off as a romantic comedy about a Jewish couple -- Noah (Benjamin Ratner), a water-proofing expert, and Zipporah (Frida Betrani), a hugely untalented country singer -- who are desperate to get married after a six-month courtship. This desire flourishes despite solid reservations from family, friends, spiritual advisers and even their own inner voices.

Noah breaks the news to his fishing buddies Peter (Tom Scholte), a Canadian lit professor, and Shane (Vincent Gale), a disillusioned architect, who react with underwhelming enthusiasm. Both live with their girlfriends in apparent harmony, yet subterranean cracks are developing there too.

After the wedding, things go from bad to worse in all three cases. Zipporah's singing career is a nonstarter, so she spends her days watching TV and her nights making her husband miserable. Peter lets an oversexed student (Marya Delver) all too easily come between him and his librarian girlfriend, Leslie (Nancy Sivak). Shane rages against the success his girlfriend, Sarah (Molly Parker), experiences in her new architectural job.

The film's comic tone soon enough gets tossed out in favor of sheer nastiness and sexual candor. Yet the film fails as drama since its superficial fight scenes never explore the characters' true anxieties or emotional needs. You can't even imagine why these couples are couples. To create "The War of the Roses", you must first have roses.

Perhaps Sweeney is aiming for a dark satire about relationships. But the third act is far too late for such a tonal change.

The film succeeds in two areas: For once, physical violence is perpetuated by women against men. And if not for once then certainly for one of the few times, Vancouver, British Columbia, actually represents the city of Vancouver.

LAST WEDDING

Last Wedding Prods.

with the participation of

the Canadian Television Fund, Telefilm Canada

Producer:Stephen Hegyes

Screenwriter-director:Bruce Sweeney

Executive producer:G.D. Sweeney

Director of photography:David Pelletier

Production designer:Tony Devenyi

Music:Don Macdonald

Costume designer:Andrea Hiestand

Editor:Ross Weber

Color/stereo

Cast:

Noah:Benjamin Ratner

Zipporah:Frida Betrani

Peter:Tom Scholte

Leslie:Nancy Sivak

Shane:Vincent Gale

Sarah:Molly Parker

Running time -- 100 minutes

No MPAA rating

Last Wedding

"Last Wedding" is a movie about male/female relationships -- bad male/female relationships. It's not about anything else, so after 100 minutes you'll either want to get divorced or throw a cooked chicken at writer-director Bruce Sweeney. The latter proves to be an effective weapon one woman uses against her husband, so that's not as far-fetched as it sounds.

This Canadian film, selected as the opening-night gala for the Toronto Film Festival, has secured Canadian distribution, but theatrical chances elsewhere look grim.

Sweeney, making his third film, proves adept at constructing scenes of brutal emotional violence: Scenes where couples push all the right buttons to tear each other apart. Yet in each instance, he fails to provide an underlying reason for the over-the-top dysfunction.

The three couples at the center of the movie individually suffer from career pressures, petty jealousies and general dissatisfaction with life. Yet why these troubles spill over into their romantic relationships to such a poisonous degree is never clear.

The movie starts off as a romantic comedy about a Jewish couple -- Noah (Benjamin Ratner), a water-proofing expert, and Zipporah (Frida Betrani), a hugely untalented country singer -- who are desperate to get married after a six-month courtship. This desire flourishes despite solid reservations from family, friends, spiritual advisers and even their own inner voices.

Noah breaks the news to his fishing buddies Peter (Tom Scholte), a Canadian lit professor, and Shane (Vincent Gale), a disillusioned architect, who react with underwhelming enthusiasm. Both live with their girlfriends in apparent harmony, yet subterranean cracks are developing there too.

After the wedding, things go from bad to worse in all three cases. Zipporah's singing career is a nonstarter, so she spends her days watching TV and her nights making her husband miserable. Peter lets an oversexed student (Marya Delver) all too easily come between him and his librarian girlfriend, Leslie (Nancy Sivak). Shane rages against the success his girlfriend, Sarah (Molly Parker), experiences in her new architectural job.

The film's comic tone soon enough gets tossed out in favor of sheer nastiness and sexual candor. Yet the film fails as drama since its superficial fight scenes never explore the characters' true anxieties or emotional needs. You can't even imagine why these couples are couples. To create "The War of the Roses", you must first have roses.

Perhaps Sweeney is aiming for a dark satire about relationships. But the third act is far too late for such a tonal change.

The film succeeds in two areas: For once, physical violence is perpetuated by women against men. And if not for once then certainly for one of the few times, Vancouver, British Columbia, actually represents the city of Vancouver.

LAST WEDDING

Last Wedding Prods.

with the participation of

the Canadian Television Fund, Telefilm Canada

Producer:Stephen Hegyes

Screenwriter-director:Bruce Sweeney

Executive producer:G.D. Sweeney

Director of photography:David Pelletier

Production designer:Tony Devenyi

Music:Don Macdonald

Costume designer:Andrea Hiestand

Editor:Ross Weber

Color/stereo

Cast:

Noah:Benjamin Ratner

Zipporah:Frida Betrani

Peter:Tom Scholte

Leslie:Nancy Sivak

Shane:Vincent Gale

Sarah:Molly Parker

Running time -- 100 minutes

No MPAA rating

See also

Credited With | External Sites