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Aw! Denzel Washington Was Happily Surrounded by Family While Being Honored at the AFI Gala

Denzel Washington, 64, was honored at the 47th AFI Life Achievement Award tribute gala on Thursday by a handful of stars, such as Michael B. Jordan, Chadwick Boseman, and Julia Roberts. During the Los Angeles event, Denzel - who was joined by wife Pauletta and his kids Katia, 31, and Malcolm, 28 - listened as his peers took the stage to sing his praises and revere his illustrious career, which includes starring in classics like Training Day and Remember the Titans.

Julia - who starred alongside Denzel in 1993's The Pelican Brief - read a heartfelt letter of recommendation written by Denzel's university acting teacher, Robert Stone. "I say without hesitation that Mr. Washington is the finest young actor I have ever known," the letter read. "If there is such a thing as genius, then I assure you Mr. Washington is one. I honestly believe that even now he is the best actor
See full article at Popsugar »

Denzel Washington Receives AFI Life Achievement Award At Emotional, Inspiring Tribute In Hollywood

Denzel Washington Receives AFI Life Achievement Award At Emotional, Inspiring Tribute In Hollywood
Perhaps it is telling us something about the history of the film industry that Denzel Washington, last night’s highly deserving honoree for the 47th AFI Life Achievement Award, is only the third African American to ever receive it, and before Morgan Freeman was honored in 2011, Sidney Poitier in 1992 was the only person of color on the AFI list. Of course careers like two-time Oscar winner Washington’s are increasingly rare, but as evidenced by tributes from the stage by the likes of Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Mahershala Ali, and Jamie Foxx, there can be no question Washington won’t be the last African American so honored considering those his career has clearly inspired. It seemed entirely appropriate that Jennifer Hudson came out mid-show to sing “A Change Is Gonna Come”, and received a rousing standing ovation when it was over.

That kind of change was even evidenced at
See full article at Deadline »

Chadwick Boseman: Why There Would be No ‘Black Panther’ Without Denzel Washington

  • Variety
Chadwick Boseman: Why There Would be No ‘Black Panther’ Without Denzel Washington
“He’s our shining prince,” director Ava Duvernay told Variety on the red carpet. “He truly is the embodiment of the totality of black masculinity that has been missing for so many years on screen before he arrived. He has picked up the baton of Sidney Poitier and the other greats [like] Ossie Davis and has done us all proud.”

DuVernay was talking about Denzel Washington at the Oscar winner’s AFI Life Achievement Award tribute on Thursday night at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood.

Julia Roberts, Spike Lee, Morgan Freeman and Cicely Tyson were just a handful of the other guests who gathered to toast the “Fences” star.

“The career is what I’m most proud of,” Washington told reporters on the red carpet. “The arc of if it, the longevity, the fact that I still have a desire to do it. You go through all of it, the thick
See full article at Variety »

Melina Matsoukas Honored With AFI’s Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal

  • Variety
Melina Matsoukas Honored With AFI’s Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal
This year’s recipient of the Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal is Melina Matsoukas, an alumna of the AFI class of 2005 who has directed such seminal works as Beyonce’s “Formation” video on the “Lemonade” visual album and the “Thanksgiving” episode of “Master of None.” Later this year, her feature film debut “Queen & Slim” will be released by Universal Pictures.

“It’s a complete honor,” Matsoukas says. “The award means that we want new voices, new stories, and that people are valuing those stories. I hope it will inspire and show black boys and girls that they can achieve greatness.”

As for being the first woman of color to receive the honor, she says: “It feels great. And I do hope that we’re starting to see change. With ‘Queen & Slim,’ for example, here are two black women with creative control telling this story. We’re giving voice
See full article at Variety »

‘Lemonade’ Director Melina Matsoukas To Receive AFI’s Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal

  • Deadline
The American Film Institute said that film, TV and music video artist Melina Matsoukas will be this year’s recipient of the Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal, which honors creative talents of AFI Conservatory alumni who embody the qualities of the filmmaker for which it is named after.

The medal, which recognizes artists that have talent, taste, dedication and commitment to quality storytelling in film and TV, will be presented at the AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute to Denzel Washington in Hollywood on June 6.

Matsoukas is the first woman of color to be honored with the medal.

Matsoukas, who is from the AFI Class of 2005, is known for numerous films, TV series and music videos. One of her most notable works is Beyonce’s game-changing visual album Lemonade. She also directed the “Thanksgiving” episode of Master of None, for which Lena Waithe won the Emmy for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series.
See full article at Deadline »

Bruno Ganz Dies: Swiss Actor In ‘Downfall’ Was 77

  • Deadline
Bruno Ganz Dies: Swiss Actor In ‘Downfall’ Was 77
Bruno Ganz, whose best-known roles were portraying the extremes of an angel and Adolph Hitler, died in Zurich at age 77 on Friday. His cause of death was colon cancer, according to representatives.

His memorable portrayal of German dictator Adolph Hitler in 2004’s Downfall was considered Ganz’s biggest role. But his appearance as an angel in the 1987 Wim Wenders film Wings of Desire also drew accolades. He later reprised that role in the 1993 follow, Faraway, So Close!

Among his other critically hailed roles included appearances in Stephen Daldry’s Oscar-nominated The Reader (2008), Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu, the Jonathan Demme remake of The Manchurian Candidate and Franklin J. Schaffner’s The Boys from Brazil.

But it was the role of Hitler that truly made Ganz. Some criticized him for humanizing the brutal dictator, but Ganz’s portrayal later became popular in the social media age, as clever meme creators gave people
See full article at Deadline »

Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor best known for dramatizing Adolf Hitler’s final days in 2004’s “Downfall,” has died. He was 77.

Ganz died at his home in Zurich on Friday, his representatives told media outlets. The cause of death was reportedly colon cancer.

In addition to delivering one of the definitive cinematic portrayals of Hitler, Ganz played an angel who gives up immortality to experience earthly pleasures in Wim Wenders’ classic film “Wings of Desire” (1987). He reprised that role in Wenders’ 1993 follow-up, “Faraway, So Close!”

His celestial performance was so memorable that Ganz once recounted how people ascribed special powers to him when they recognized him in public.

“People in planes said: ‘Ah, no need to be afraid, because with you here, nothing can happen. Now we are safe,'” Ganz told the Danish film journal P.O.V. “Or a mother said to her child: ‘Look, there’s your guardian angel.
See full article at Variety »

Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor best known for dramatizing Adolf Hitler’s final days in 2004’s “Downfall,” has died. He was 77.

Ganz died at his home in Zurich on Friday, his representatives told media outlets. The cause of death was reportedly colon cancer.

In addition to delivering one of the definitive cinematic portrayals of Hitler, Ganz played an angel who gives up immortality to experience earthly pleasures in Wim Wenders’ classic film “Wings of Desire” (1987). He reprised that role in Wenders’ 1993 follow-up, “Faraway, So Close!”

His celestial performance was so memorable that Ganz once recounted how people ascribed special powers to him when they recognized him in public.

“People in planes said: ‘Ah, no need to be afraid, because with you here, nothing can happen. Now we are safe,'” Ganz told the Danish film journal P.O.V. “Or a mother said to her child: ‘Look, there’s your guardian angel.
See full article at Variety »

2019 DGA Awards live blog: Alfonso Cuaron wins Best Feature Film, Bo Burnham upsets Bradley Cooper

2019 DGA Awards live blog: Alfonso Cuaron wins Best Feature Film, Bo Burnham upsets Bradley Cooper
Winners for the 71st Directors Guild of America Awards will be unveiled Saturday, Feb. 2, at 10:30 p.m. Et / 7:30 p.m. Pt in a non-televised ceremony hosted by Aisha Tyler at the Hollywood and Highland Center in Los Angeles. Follow along below with our live blog as we’ll be updating with all the winners as they happen.

During the ceremony, per tradition, all five feature film nominees — Bradley Cooper (“A Star Is Born”), Alfonso Cuaron (“Roma”), Peter Farrelly (“Green Book”), Spike Lee (“BlacKkKlansman”) and Adam McKay (“Vice”) — will be presented with nomination medallions by stars of their films before the winner is revealed in the final award of the night. Three of these five reaped Best Director Oscar nominations, with Cooper and Farrelly missing for Yorgos Lanthimos (“The Favourite”) and Pawel Pawlikowski (“Cold War”).

Cooper has a second DGA nomination for Best First-Time Director, where he’s up
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Papillon’ Review

  • Nerdly
Stars: Charlie Hunnam, Rami Malek, Tommy Flanagan, Eve Hewson, Roland Moller, Nina Senicar, Michael Socha | Written by Aaron Guzikowski | Directed by Michael Noer

Based on the international best-selling autobiography by Henri Charrière, Papillon follows the epic true story of Henri “Papillon” Charrière (Charlie Hunnam), a safecracker from the Parisian underworld who is framed for murder and condemned to life in a notorious penal colony on Devil’s Island. Determined to regain his freedom, Papillon forms an unlikely alliance with convicted counterfeiter Louis Dega (Rami Malek) who, in exchange for protection, agrees to finance Papillon’s escape, ultimately resulting in a bond of lasting friendship.

Michael Noer has taken the highly unusual task of remaking the film in what is regarded as the last great dramatic role of American icon Steve McQueen, in the likes of Papillon. A somewhat forgotten film, certainly in terms of the larger talent and intoxicatingly immeasurable
See full article at Nerdly »

Oscar Flashback: The eight films that struck out in the Big Five, including ‘Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,’ ‘American Hustle’

Oscar Flashback: The eight films that struck out in the Big Five, including ‘Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,’ ‘American Hustle’
This article marks Part 1 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories beginning with the eight that were shut out of these top races.

At the 31st Academy Awards ceremony, “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” (1958) was well-positioned for Oscar glory. Critically acclaimed and commercially successful, the film adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ play was up in six categories, including the Big Five, plus Best Cinematography.

Instead of emerging victorious, however, the film found itself steamrolled over. It would lose Best Picture and Best Director (Richard Brooks) to the musical “Gigi” and its filmmaker,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Film Review: ‘Papillon” Still Packs a Classic & Compelling Story

Chicago – The remarkable true-ish story of “Papillon” is difficult to mess up. Henrí Charriére published the “autobiographical novel” in 1969, and the first film version dropped in 1973, with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman as the two leads no less. The latest film has Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek in those leads, as two French prisoners constantly trying to escape.

Rating: 3.5/5.0

The film does suffer from comparison to the first version (directed by veteran Franklin J. Schaffner), but it is still a well-done unfolding of a audacious prison “adventure.” The French word for butterfly, “Papillon,” is the nickname of Charriére, a prisoner in the French Guiana (Devil’s Island) system from 1931 to 1945. He spent his whole time there trying to escape, in broader and more interesting schemes. The movie exploits that aspect of the story, and created some nice scenarios in letting them play out. Hunnam and Malek (“Mr. Robot”) won’t
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

‘Papillon’ Film Review: Prison Escape Remake Can’t Bust Its Own Chains

  • The Wrap
‘Papillon’ Film Review: Prison Escape Remake Can’t Bust Its Own Chains
As endurance tales go, Frenchman Henri Charrière’s is one of the most intense, a case of wrongful imprisonment that moves from the degradation of a notorious penal colony to the isolated awfulness of Devil’s Island. Charrière’s 1969 book “Papillon,” named for his moniker (derived from a butterfly tattoo) and an autobiographical dramatization of his experiences, became a popular, controversial memoir in France. So why has it inspired not just one but two so-so prison escape films?

Franklin J. Schaffner’s 1973 epic of grime and sweat “Papillon” was made from a screenplay co-written by Dalton Trumbo. It boasted megastar Steve McQueen in you-can’t-break-me mode ten years after “The Great Escape,” but to lesser effect, and Dustin Hoffman — as Papillon’s pal Louis Dega — once more flexing his peculiar gift for disappearing into a role and chewing scenery simultaneously. At two and a half hours, it barely justified its running time,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Papillon’ Review: Despair Tough to Escape in Remake of Prison Epic

‘Papillon’ Review: Despair Tough to Escape in Remake of Prison Epic
Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman brought star power to this escape-from-Devil’s-Island epic back in 1973. Now Papillon has been remade with Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek in the roles of two prisoners who plan to bust out of their dehumanizing cage in colonial French Guiana. Hunnam (Sons of Anarchy) and Malek (Mr. Robot) are not quite box-office names yet, but their acting chops are undeniable. And this true-life tale, based on the 1969 memoirs of Henri Charrière, still holds your attention. But Danish director Michael Noer, working from a script by Aaron Guzikowski,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Yvonne Blake, 'Superman' Costume Designer, Dies at 78

Yvonne Blake, 'Superman' Costume Designer, Dies at 78
Yvonne Blake, designer of the iconic costumes for the 1978 box-office hit Superman, has died. She was 78.

Blake died Tuesday in Madrid, a spokesperson for the Spanish Film Academy told The Hollywood Reporter. She had been the academy's president since October 2016 but suffered a stroke in January.

She shared an Academy Award with Antonio Castillo for the three-hour-plus 1971 costume drama Nicholas and Alexandra, directed by Franklin J. Schaffner. "I suppose all one can say is that if it wasn't for the Russian Revolution, I wouldn't be here," Blake said when accepting her award.

Her work ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1970s: Francis Ford Coppola, Bob Fosse, Woody Allen … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1970s: Francis Ford Coppola, Bob Fosse, Woody Allen … ? [Poll]
Best Picture and Best Director matched up almost completely at the Oscars during the 1970s, with one notable exception in 1972 when Bob Fosse won Best Director for “Cabaret” while “The Godfather” won Best Picture. This was a decade of sweeps for many of the films that won Best Picture, and their respective directors were rightfully rewarded for bringing all the technical elements together into one cohesive narrative. But which Best Director Oscar winner of the 1970s is your favorite? Look back on each winner and vote in our poll below.

Franklin J. Schaffner, “Patton” (1970) — Schaffner was the first Best Director winner of the 1970s for “Patton,” his epic George S. Patton biopic. He was not nominated for any other Oscars, though he did collect three Primetime Emmys for multiple projects in the ’50s and ’60s.

SEEMilos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]

William Friedkin,
See full article at Gold Derby »

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1970s: ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Rocky,’ ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ … ? [Poll]

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1970s: ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Rocky,’ ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ … ? [Poll]
The 1970s are thought of as a real golden age for movies, particularly the prestige dramas honored at the Oscars. The ’70s include some of the most beloved movies of all time winning Best Picture, largely matching the critical and public consensus. But which Best Picture Oscar winner of the 1970s do you consider your favorite? Look back on each winner and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Patton” (1970) — The ’70s began with the awarding of “Patton,” a biopic about the hot-tempered World War II General George S. Patton. Nominated for 10 Oscars, it won seven, including Picture, Director for Franklin J. Schaffner, Actor for George C. Scott, Original Screenplay, Art Direction, Film Editing, and Sound. Scott famously declined his Oscar, rejecting the Academy Awards as “a two-hour meat parade.”

See‘Amadeus’ voted top Best Picture Oscar winner of the 1980s, rising above all ‘mediocrities’ [Poll Results]

The French Connection” (1971) — A
See full article at Gold Derby »

Papillon Trailer Has Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek Planning a Prison Break

Papillon Trailer Has Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek Planning a Prison Break
45 years after the original movie hit theaters, Bleecker Street has released the first trailer for their remake of the 1973 classic Papillon. Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek star as Henri "Papillon" Charriere and Louis Dega, respectively, roles that were originally played by Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman in this film based on an incredible true story. It will be interesting to see how fans react to this film, especially since there have been some who have questioned the validity of Henri "Papillon" Charriere's "true" story.

The original autobiographical novel Papillon was first published in France in 1969, by Henri Charriere, recounting his harrowing experience of being incarcerated for a murder he didn't commit in French Guyana in a 14-year period between 1931 and 1945. The book was a huge hit in France, spending 21 straight weeks as the number one bestseller, before it was translated into English by Patrick O'Brian and published for English readers in 1970. Charriere,
See full article at MovieWeb »

First Papillon Trailer Stars Charlie Hunnam & Rami Malek

Two of the biggest movie stars in the 1960’s and 1970’s starred in a film called Papillon. Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman were household names at the time and together they headlined the movie for director Franklin J. Schaffner, best known for Planet Of The Apes (1968) and Patton (1970).

Composer Jerry Goldsmith saw an Oscar nomination for Best Music, Original Dramatic Score. The screenwriter was Dalton Trumbo (Spartacus), most famous of the blacklisted film professionals known to history as the Hollywood 10. Trumbo won Oscars posthumously for The Brave One (1956) and Roman Holiday (1953).

The original poster for the 1973 film is similar with the stars featured, along with their names.

Watch Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek plan their escape in the new trailer from Bleecker Street’s updated version Papillon.

Based on the international best-selling autobiographic books “Papillon” and “Banco”, the film follows the epic story of Henri “Papillon” Charrière (Charlie Hunnam), a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Listen to the Corpse Club Celebrate the 50th Anniversaries of Night Of The Living Dead and Planet Of The Apes on a New Episode of Daily Dead’s Podcast

Time sure does fly when you're having frightful fun... Although it may be hard to believe, this is already the 50th episode of Daily Dead's official podcast, and the Corpse Club team celebrates with a trip to a besieged farmhouse and a journey to a world of primates that you won't forget.

They're coming to get you... in episode 50 of Daily Dead's official podcast! The Corpse Club co-hosts celebrate a milestone 50th episode by taking a look at two genre game-changers that celebrate their 50th anniversaries this year: George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead and Franklin J. Schaffner's Planet of the Apes. Released in a turbulent time in American history, each movie's enduring elements are examined by the Corpse Club team half a century later, including Romero's bold storytelling decisions, John Chambers' groundbreaking makeup effects, and much more. So sit back, relax, and enjoy a
See full article at DailyDead »
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