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Almodóvar has started shooting his next film!

by Nathaniel R

Pedro Almodóvar has begun shooting his next film which is called Pain & Glory, so we can expect it in 2019. This will be Penelope Cruz's sixth collaboration with one of the world's greatest directors. Antonio Banderas will also co-star, marking his 7th Pedro film. Other Almodóvar regulars appearing will be Kiti Mánver (6th time) and Julieta Serrano (5th time). Though Pedro pictures are usually all about the actresses occassionally he throws gorgeous men into the mix. And this looks like one of those times. In addition to Banderas in what we assume will be the lead role (?), we've got: Raúl Arévalo from I'm So Excited, Leonardo Sbaraglia (Wild Tales) and Asier Etxeandia (Ma Ma).

The movie will also be the feature debut for a young popular singer named Rosalía. She posted the following picture on her instagram...
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Best Foreign Shows to Binge This Summer

  • Variety
The Best Foreign Shows to Binge This Summer
Looking past the regular popular streaming playlists, audiences can find quality television shows to binge made in countries both across the pond and south of the border. Read on to find the best international television shows to watch this summer.

Breathe

“Breathe,” starring R. Madhavan and Amit Sadh, is an Indian thriller that features a cat-and-mouse story as a police detective tries to solve a string of murders of organ donors. His prime suspect is a father desperately seeking a donor to save his dying son.

How to Watch: Amazon Prime

Cable Girls

This Spanish period drama follows four women working in Madrid’s first and only telephone company in 1929 right before the global financial crash. The show showcases the hardships working women faced during the time period and how they overcame them. The series stars Blanca Suárez, Maggie Civantos, Ángela Cremonte, and Nadia de Santiago.

How to Watch: Netflix
See full article at Variety »

From Killing Eve to Lykkeland: the best shows at Canneseries

The inaugural TV competition threw up some interesting fare, from overall winner When Heroes Fly to Italian mob drama The Hunter and Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s excellent thriller

This Spanish drama starts in grizzly manner. The camera slowly reveals a double murder, involving a prostitute with links to the Chinese mob. Felix is film director Cesc Gay’s stab at big-budget TV and in the build up to its screening he has spoken about taking inspiration from Hitchcock’s back catalogue, especially the James Stewart era of suspense, thrills and murk. Felix doesn’t quite reach those heady heights but as Leonardo Sbaraglia in the lead role does manage to encapsulate the same fish-out-of-water feel that Stewart brought to Hitchcock’s best thrillers. Shot on location in Andorra, the setting is breathtaking and there’s a healthy dollop of humour amid the gruesome corpses. ITV is dealing with the international rights,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

High-end TV drama comes to Cannes with Miptv and Canneseries

High-end TV drama comes to Cannes with Miptv and Canneseries
New TV festival kicks off with Cesc Gay’s Félix; Miptv previews works-in-progress in pre-market showcase.

High-end drama was in the spotlight at Cannes’ Palais des Festivals on Sunday (April 8), with 10 new series playing throughout the day in the Lumière and Debussy theatres, traditionally associated with film premieres.

The morning saw the kick-off of the competition screenings of fledgling TV drama-focused festival Canneseries, while sister event Miptv also showcased six work-in-progress series in a pre-market event aimed at buyers in the afternoon.

Spanish director Cesc Gay opened the Canneseries contest with his genre-mixing, tragi-comic thriller Félix, set against the backdrop
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Miptv, Canneseries fills Cannes Palais with high-end drama

Miptv, Canneseries fills Cannes Palais with high-end drama
New TV festival kicks off with Cesc Gay’s Félix; Miptv previews works-in-progress in pre-market showcase.

High-end drama was in the spotlight at Cannes’ Palais des Festivals on Sunday (April 8), with 10 new series playing throughout the day in the Lumière and Debussy theatres, traditionally associated with film premieres.

The morning saw the kick-off of the competition screenings of fledgling TV drama-focused festival Canneseries, while sister event Miptv also showcased six work-in-progress series in a pre-market event aimed at buyers in the afternoon.

Spanish director Cesc Gay opened the Canneseries contest with his genre-mixing, tragi-comic thriller Félix, set against the backdrop
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Spain’s Cesc Gay Drills Down on Canneseries Competition Entry ‘Félix’

  • Variety
Spain’s Cesc Gay Drills Down on Canneseries Competition Entry ‘Félix’
On a plateau high up in Andorra’s Pyrenees, Felix (Leonardo Sbaraglia) gets out of a car There’s ice on the ground. But that does not explain entirely the way he walks, a near piteous shuffle, arms turned in, the gait of a meek man treating reality cautiously.

Felix is knocking 50. In Andorra, the mountain principality locked between France and Spain, he’s a fish-out-of-water, Argentine, a novelist, married, a father, though he hasn’t plucked up the courage to tell his son. The only thing that gets him out of bed in the morning is that he’s fallen in love, profoundly, with a Chinese woman (newcomer Mi Hoa), with whom he’s spent one night.

But she’s mixed up with the Chinese mafia. And she’s disappeared.

“Felix” is, like many modern series, a genre blender, a romantic comedy thriller. Ultimately, it weighs in as a date series,
See full article at Variety »

2018 Canneseries competition line-up revealed

2018 Canneseries competition line-up revealed
The event launches in Cannes this April.

Canneseries, the international TV festival launching in Cannes this April (7-11), has revealed the ten series in its official competition selection.

Scroll down for full line-up

The titles include Killing Eve created by Phoebe Waller-Bridge (Fleabag) and starring Sandra Oh and Fiona Shaw, and Aquí En La Terra, created by Gael García Bernal with Kyzza Terrazas and Jorge Dorantes.

The titles were selected by Canneseries artistic director Albin Lewi.

The festival was founded by David Lisnard, mayor of Cannes and presided by former French culture minister Fleur Pellerin. It will run alongside Miptv.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

BBC America’s ‘Killing Eve’ Is Sole U.S. Entry As Canneseries Reveals Inaugural Competition Selections

  • Indiewire
BBC America’s “Killing Eve” has been selected for this year’s first-ever Canneseries TV festival competition — making it the only U.S. show in a field of ten international productions. “Killing Eve” will be up for one of six awards handed out on April 11, along side new series from Belgium, Germany, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Norway, South Korea, and Spain.

The ten shows will be vying for Best Music, Best Screenplay, Special Performance Prize, Best Performance and Best Series trophies.

As previously announced, author and producer Harlan Coben has been named jury president for the competition, which takes place April 7 to 11. The U.S.-based Coben will be joined on the panel by actress Paula Beer (Germany), screenwriter and director Audrey Fouché (France), actress Melisa Sözen (Turkey), composer Cristobal Tapia de Veer (Chile/Canada) and actor Michael K. Williams (USA).

Coben’s new series “Safe,” which will air in France
See full article at Indiewire »

Monica Lozano’s Alebrije Cine & Video to Remake Argentina’s ‘El Garante’ (Exclusive)

“El Garante” (“Collateral Man”), possibly the most-awarded local mini-series in Argentina’s TV history, is getting a Mexican version with Mexican uber producer Monica Lozano of Alebrije Cine & Video (“Instructions Not Included,” “Que Culpa Tiene el Niño,” “Amores Perros”) exploring a film makeover of the 1997 series.

Jose Levy of Creative Andina and Alex Ferrara co-wrote a novel based on the series, sold by Amazon on its Best Latino Thrilllers Collection and available in English, Spanish and Turkish. Alebrije is basing its film adaptation on the book, said Lozano.

Chile’s Tvn already made its own version of the Argentine hit in 2005 where it ranked second in overall ratings that year, after a telenovela. Spain’s Morena Films has also optioned the show for its own TV version.

“How such a cult series in Argentina has been able to appeal to various territories, in whatever format, is great,” said Levy who
See full article at Variety - Film News »

ITV Studios Global Ent. To Handle Movistar+ Original ‘Felix’

ITV Studios Global Ent. To Handle Movistar+ Original ‘Felix’
Confirming the large interest of Europe’s foremost TV sales houses in handling original series produced by Telefonica’s Movistar+, ITV Studios Global Ent. has acquired international distribution rights to Cesc Gay’s drama “Felix.”

Starring Argentina’s Leonardo Sbaraglia, “Felix” forms part of Movistar+’s ambitious original production plans, which sees an annual investment of €70 million ($83 million) in TV fiction productions.

This bet is allowing Movistar+, Spain’s leading paybox, to launch its first four original series -“The Zone,” “The Plague,” “Velvet Collection” and “Vergüenza”- by 2017, and release some 10 further new titles by the end of next year.

“Felix” is an instance of close creative collaboration between audience-friendly auteur Gay (“Truman,” “Krampack,” “In the City”) and thesp Sbaraglia (“Wild Tales”).

An eight-episode romantic thriller with doses of humor and mystery, “Felix” filmed on location in Andorra, Madrid and Barcelona for 19 weeks, enough time for a director and an actor “to construct a role and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Viff 2017: At The End Of The Tunnel is Deliriously Entertaining [Review]

If you're looking for a double feature of low-brow heist movies that are far better than they have any right to be, you need look no further than Steven Soderbergh's Logan Lucky and Rodrigo Grande's Argentinean thriller At the End of the Tunnel.

Leonardo Sbaraglia stars as Joaquin, a paraplegic engineer who lives alone in a big house a couple of doors down from a bank. When he starts hearing noises from the house next door, he begins to use his endless amounts of free time to observe what the neighbours are up to and it quickly becomes apparent that they're planning a robbery via a tunnel that will come directly under his home. So Joaquin devises a plan to get to the bank first, steal some of the money and get away before the robbers ever figure out what happened except, [Continued ...]
See full article at QuietEarth »

Mexico’s Fénix Ibero-American Film Awards Honor TV Series for First Time

Mexico’s Fénix Ibero-American Film Awards Honor TV Series for First Time
In a nod to the exponential growth of quality TV series, Mexico’s Fenix Ibero-American Film Awards have included television content among the nominees this year. The selection is determined by Cinema23 which is comprised of 700 film professionals from Latin America, Spain and Portugal.

Nominees for the 4th Fenix Awards include 20 feature films, nine documentaries and 13 TV series, Cinema23 announced. Winners will be unveiled at the Teatro de la Ciudad Esperanza, Mexico City on December 6, 2017. The glittering event will be broadcast live across the Americas, except Canada, via E! Entertainment Television, Studio Universal, Canal 52Mx and Cinelatino.

The nominations were pre-selected out of a pool of 800 projects by a committee comprised of critics, programmers, festival directors and film academics. In a second phase, Cinema23 members specializing in a particular field, be they actors, directors, editors or cinematographers, voted on their choices for their specific category.

Netflix has at least three original series in contention: “Narcos,” “3%” and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movistar +: Rundown of Telefonica’s High-End Drama Slate

Movistar +: Rundown of Telefonica’s High-End Drama Slate
Madrid — Telefonica’s Movistar + bows two of its first series, “The Plague” and “Spanish Shame” at San Sebastián. That is one of the highlights of this year’s festival. But there are more series to come. Here’s a rundown of Movistar +’s original series plans, taking in seven greenlit series:

Velvet Collection”

Sold by Beta Film, a sequel to “Velvet,” a milestone in modern TV romantic melodrama, the series jumps from Madrid to Barcelona, exchanging the “Mad Men-ish” world of cinched waists for the Swinging ‘60s. Created by Ramón Campos and Gema R. Neira, produced by Teresa Fernández-Valdés, all at the Studiocanal co-owned Bambú, the 10-episode, 50-minute series world premiered Sept. 5 at Spain’s Vitoria FesTVal, then bowed on Movistar + on Sept. 22.

“The Zone”

Also on Beta Film’s books, and one of Mipcom’s featured International Screenings, a road movie-Western-crime thriller set in a no go zone after a nuclear accident trailing a cop (Eduard Fernández
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Disney’s ‘10 Days Without Mom’ No. 1 Argentine Movie of 2017

Disney’s ‘10 Days Without Mom’ No. 1 Argentine Movie of 2017
Disney, the most dominant of all Hollywood studios last year in Latin America, has another Argentine hit on its hands: Ariel Winograd’s “Mamá se fue de viaje” (“10 Days Without Mom”) which has just overtaken Ricardo Darin’s “Black Snow” after two weeks at theaters to become the highest-grossing Argentine hit of 2017.

Produced by Patagonik, a joint venture between Disney and Argentine broadcast group Artear, “10 Days Without Mom” bowed July 6 to place No. 3 but surged 7% in its second week for a total 685,233 admissions, about $3.8 million. Also starring Leonardo Sbaraglia, “Black Snow” cumed a total 684,474 admissions, according to Argentine box office compiler Ultracine.

Ripped by FilmSharks Intl. a longtime tittle-by-title Patagonik sales company partner, “10 Days” is also pushing out international sales, closing a remake deal with Mexico’s

“Nobody expected it,” Argentine newspaper Clarin said about “10 Days Without Mom’s” Argentine record for the year. That said, headed by Juan Pablo Galli and Juan Vera and backed by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Seattle International Film Festival: ‘Sami Blood,’ ‘At the End of the Tunnel’ Come Out on Top

Seattle International Film Festival: ‘Sami Blood,’ ‘At the End of the Tunnel’ Come Out on Top
The 2017 Seattle International Film Festival announced its audience award recipients and official competition winners on Sunday. Films “At the End of the Tunnel” and “Sami Blood (Sameblod)” and documentaries “Dolores” and “Becoming Who I Was” were the standouts from the Washington-based competition.

Over 82,000 ballots were cast at Siff this year for the five official categories and six audience awards.

Amanda Kernell’s coming-of-age drama “Sami Blood (Sameblod)” from Sweden, Norway, and Demark was named the grand jury prize winner for the official competition. The jury chose the film as its main festival winner “for its beautifully nuanced and spare portrayal of the struggle to discover who you are, both because of and in spite of where you are from.” They also praised the inclusion of the Scandinavian setting’s rarely seen culture.

Related

Cannes Film Festival: Critics Pick Their 10 Favorite Films

Chang-Yong Moon and Jin Jeon’s “Becoming Who I Was
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ricardo Darin thriller inks key deals

  • ScreenDaily
Ricardo Darin thriller inks key deals
Exclusive: Film Sharks scores sales on redemption feature.

Black Snow (Nieve Negra), the thriller starring Argentinian superstar Ricardo Darin who is in official selection at Cannes Film Festival with The Summit (El Cordillera), has sparked a flurry of multi-platform transactions for Film Sharks including a global streaming deal with Netflix.

Fabian Bielinsky protégé Martin Hodara’s film has also gone to DirecTV for Latin American TVoD rights, and as previously announced will open theatrically in Spain through A Contracorriente, and Italy via Movies Inspired.

Paris Films will distribute in Brazil, and Seven Films in Greece. Buena Vista International reported more than 750,000 admissions in South America.

Talks are ongoing for theatrical deals in the UK, Australia, Germany and Scandinavia on the story of a man living in self-imposed exile in Patagonia years after he was accused of killing his brother.

Old rivalries are reignited when he is visited by another brother and his wife with a land sale
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Norman', 'For Your Own Good' bookend 34th Miami Film Festival

'Norman', 'For Your Own Good' bookend 34th Miami Film Festival
Festival to screen 131 films, of which 36 are directed or co-directed by women.

Richard Gere will kick off festivities with the opening night gala screening of Norman: The Moderate Rise And Tragic Fall Of A New York Fixer. The festival runs from March 3-12.

The 34th annual Miami Film Festival (Mff) will close with the international premiere of Carlos Theron’s For Your Own Good from Spain starring José Coronado, Javier Cámara and Roberto Alamo.

Cuba is prominently featured in the programme. Kenny Ortega’s A Change Of Heart gets its world premiere and filmed in Miami and stars Gloria Estefan, Aimee Teegarden, Virginia Madsen, Jim Belushi and William Levy.

Fernando Perez’s Last Days In Havana (Últimos Días En La Habana) will receive its North American premiere. Uruguayan-Argentinian director Adrián Caetano, who competed in Cannes in 2006 with Chronicle Of An Escape, will debut The Lost Brother (El Otro Hermano) starring Leonardo Sbaraglia and Daniel Hendler.

They join the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Argentina’s Rodrigo Grande shopping pair of TV series

  • ScreenDaily
Argentina’s Rodrigo Grande shopping pair of TV series
Exclusive: The director of At The End Of The Tunnel, which played in official selection recently at the Rome Film Festival, has been generating heat with two television projects.

Grande, a genre-hopping talent from Rosario whose well-received third film allowed him to flex his crime thriller muscles, is talking up Triple Frontera and Black Chronicles.

Like At The End Of The Tunnel (Al Final Del Túnel), both keep Grande in thriller territory. Triple Frontera also exhibits broader dramatic elements and takes place in the tri-border region of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay that is home to the Iguazú Falls and more ominously serves as a stomping ground for drug gangs and human traffickers.

“It’s about a family that’s looking for a son who’s lost and they find themselves in trouble,” Grande said of the Spanish-language property.

Black Chronicles is a psychological thriller about a cross-border smuggling service for people anxious to take flight.

The story – which
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rome Film Review: ‘At the End of the Tunnel’

A seven-year hiatus from directing features seems to be just what Rodrigo Grande (“A Matter of Principles”) needed, since “At the End of the Tunnel” is by far the helmer’s most accomplished of his three films. The kind of movie that makes Saturday nights at the multiplex enjoyable, “Tunnel” is a tense, sharply made thriller about a paraplegic who discovers his attractive woman boarder is in cahoots with a team of hoods digging under his house and into the neighboring bank vault. With influences ranging from “Rififi” to “The Great Escape,” the film lays no claim to inventing the genre, yet Grande’s script is fun, his characters intriguing, and his buildup expertly paced. Receipts in Argentina were a respectable $1.2 million following an April opening, and a general European release could add nicely to the pic’s coffers – though late-summer Spanish returns failed to reach $800,000.

Joaquin (Leonardo Sbaraglia, “Wild
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tokyo Film Review: ‘The Silence of the Sky’

Tokyo Film Review: ‘The Silence of the Sky’
If you only see one film this year which opens with a violent rape in a well-appointed middle-class home and goes on to follow the complex, unexpected responses to that violation, you should probably make it Paul Verhoeven’s “Elle.” But if there is room in your life for two, Brazilian multi-hyphenate Marco Dutra’s third directorial feature “The Silence of the Sky” begins in just such an arresting, upsetting manner, though it charts almost the opposite course from Verhoeven’s film thereafter and lacks its sly, ironic wit.

Indeed for the majority of its runtime, this compelling, well-acted, stylish package plays out with resolute sobriety, against a similar psychological backdrop to the other recent examples of Latin American paranoia cinema that emerged as a zeitgeisty response to the regional economic downturn and included such festival friendly-titles as Kleber Mendonça Filho’s “Neighboring Sounds,” Benjamín Naishtat’s “The History of Fear,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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