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Kelly Reilly Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3)  | Mini Bio (1)  | Spouse (1)  | Trivia (8)  | Personal Quotes (36)

Overview (3)

Born in Surrey, England, UK
Birth NameJessica Kelly Siobhán Reilly
Height 5' 6" (1.68 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Jessica Kelly Siobhán Reilly (born 18 July 1977) is an English actress. Her performance in After Miss Julie at the Donmar Warehouse made her a star of the London stage and earned her a nomination for a Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actress of 2003. Reilly was born and brought up in Chessington, Surrey, England, the daughter of a hospital receptionist mother, and Jack Reilly, a police officer. She attended Tolworth Girls' School in Kingston, where she studied drama for GCSE. Her grandparents are Irish.

Reilly wrote to the producers of the television drama Prime Suspect to ask for work, and six months later she auditioned for a role in an episode of Prime Suspect 4: Inner Circle, which was broadcast on ITV on 7 May 1995. Six years later, she again appeared alongside Helen Mirren in the film Last Orders.

Her first professional role was followed by a series of parts on the English stage. She worked with Terry Johnson in four productions: Elton John's Glasses (1997), The London Cuckolds (1998), The Graduate (2000) and Piano/Forte (2006). Johnson wrote Piano/Forte for her and said, "Kelly is possibly the most natural, dyed-in-the-wool, deep-in-the-bone actress I've ever worked with." Reilly has stated that she learned the most as an actor from Karel Reisz, who directed her in The Yalta Game in Dublin in 2001. She said, "He was my masterclass. There is no way I would have been able to do Miss Julie if I hadn't done that play."

By 2000, Reilly felt she was being typecast in comedy roles, and actively sought out a role as the young Amy in Last Orders, directed by Fred Schepisi. This was followed by a role in the Royal Court's 2001 rerun of Sarah Kane's Blasted. The Times called her "theatrical Viagra". In 2002, Reilly starred alongside Audrey Tautou and Romain Duris as Wendy, an English Erasmus student, in the French comedy L'Auberge espagnole (The Spanish Apartment). She reprised her role in the 2005 sequel, Les Poupées russes (The Russian Dolls) and the 2013 follow-up, Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle). Also in 2005, Reilly had roles in such films as Mrs Henderson Presents and Pride & Prejudice.

Reilly's first lead role came in 2008 in the horror film Eden Lake and, in 2009, she had a high-profile role on prime-time British television in Above Suspicion. Reilly also appeared in three major films: Sherlock Holmes, Triage, and Me and Orson Welles.

In 2011, Reilly reprised her role as Mary Watson in Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows. In 2012, Reilly appeared opposite Sam Rockwell in A Single Shot and had a leading role in Robert Zemeckis' Flight opposite Denzel Washington. In 2014, Reilly starred with Greg Kinnear in the film Heaven is for Real and in the John Michael McDonagh film Calvary. The same year Reilly starred in the short-lived ABC series Black Box, as Catherine Black, a famed neuroscientist who explores and solves the mysteries of the brain (the black box) while hiding her own bipolar disorder from the world.

In 2015, Reilly starred in the second season of HBO's True Detective as Jordan Semyon, the wife of Vince Vaughn's character Frank Semyon. The same year, Reilly made her Broadway debut opposite Clive Owen and Eve Best in Harold Pinter's play Old Times at the American Airlines Theatre.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: ahmetkozan

Spouse (1)

Kyle Baugher (2012 - present)

Trivia (8)

She was nominated for a 2004 Laurence Olivier Theatre Award for Best Actress of 2003 for her performance in "After Miss Julie" at the Donmar Warehouse. She became the youngest actress ever to be nominated for that category (aged 26).
She has twice worked with Rupert Penry-Jones, both times playing lovers. Once in Poirot (1989) episode, Poirot: Sad Cypress (2003), and then in Joe's Palace (2007).
Married her fiancé Kyle Baugher, a financier, in a private ceremony in Somerset, England. The couple had been in a relationship since 2010.
Her grandparents were Irish.
She won the Empire Award for Best Newcomer in 2005 for her role in the film, Mrs Henderson Presents (2005).
She married Kyle Baugher in 2012.
She received an audition for the hit British show, Prime Suspect (1991), after writing a letter to the producers.
She starred as Miss Caroline Bingley, opposite Keira Knightley, in the 2005 film, Pride & Prejudice (2005).

Personal Quotes (36)

Hand on heart, I find it a little bit embarrassing. I don't need to be on the cover of magazines. Everything I've dreamed of doing, I'm doing.
Literally, I don't know where life is gonna go from one day to the next, and that's as exciting as it is tiring.
Auditioning is a horrible experience because you know you are being absolutely scrutinized and judged. There are days where you can do it and days where it's just not happening, and I feel like that's how it is with all artists; you have some days it kind of works.
I hate to say that my mother was 'just a housewife', because in addition to that she has had lots of part-time secretarial jobs in factories and hospitals, always working really hard for our family.
Obviously, education is hugely important, along with healthcare. They're the basics and you're hurting your own country if you don't pour money into them.
It's lovely to work with a group of actors who make you laugh and smile.
My dad is such a good man, hard-working.
Women do well in their thirties. They put their bags down and say, 'This is who I am - like it or lump it.' There is a more relaxed quality, which I like.
Acting has always been such escapism for me.
As an actor, you always want to keep it different, change it up, and, you know, just to keep yourself inspired and work with interesting characters.
At my school, Shakespeare wasn't on the syllabus - at least not for me.
Being at the pinnacle of my career is not to turn up in some multiplex blockbuster.
Every job feels like my first.
I don't want to be doing fashion shoots and being interviewed about where I shop. Who cares?
I act because I have to, because I need to find out whether I can do it or not - that's what drives me and excites me and lights me up.
I love actresses who are brave and don't do what's expected of them or don't play off how they look or take risks.
My family believe you should never be flashy about anything. Maybe that handicapped me a little bit, that extreme humility.
I'm not temperamentally into high comedy. I'm not a Noel Coward kind of girl.
I'm a theater actress. I love rehearsal. I could have six weeks of rehearsal and think it's not enough. But on film, you don't get that luxury.
I've no wish to appear in celebrity magazines.
I'm not a show-off; I'm not an exhibitionist.
I love strong women in films that are allowed to play women and not male fantasies.
I think when you're an actor and you're drawing on your emotions all the time, you need to be quite steady.
I need someone who understands an artist's mentality. I couldn't be with someone who wouldn't let me have my freedom.
I'd love to work on a real girl piece with some fabulous actresses. I feel like I've worked with so many men.
I'd prefer to go under the radar and just do the acting without being famous for it.
The reason I act is because I'm trying to understand why people are as they are.
Theatre is where my heart is. It's where I can do my best work. And even if I do films and TV, that's what I want to come back to.
There is a part of me that is not fulfilled by acting. It is a self-involved life; it can feel shallow, but not very often.
We live in a celebrity-obsessed society.
When I was younger, I used to write to directors when I was unsure I could play a role. I'd say: 'You've made a terrible mistake.'
When it comes to my work, I'm fearless. I go with my gut.
The British theatre and establishment is so hard to penetrate, and there are so many talented people involved in it. So, to be counted among some of those actresses... It doesn't get better than that.
You know, I really enjoy longevity. I see actors in their forties and they just turn out these really fabulous roles and characters. You know who they are, but you wouldn't necessarily know their names.
My personal life, my normal life, is so important to me. To be able to go back to my personal life and leave characters behind is important; I don't keep them with me.
You put yourself on tape as an actor a lot - and you send them off, they go out into the ether, and you have no idea what's going to come back, or when.

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