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Today in Soap Opera History (June 24)

1966: Final episode of ABC's Never Too Young. 1983: Guiding

Light's Nola & Quint were married. 1987: As the World Turns'

Iva blurted out the truth about Lily. 1999: A gorilla plotted

to interrupt Cass & Lila's wedding on Another World."All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."

Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1946: Procter & Gamble radio soap opera Life Can Be Beautiful moved to the 3 p.m. Et timeslot on the NBC Radio network.
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Tony Awards 2018: Records, milestones and fun facts about this year’s winners include ‘The Band’s Visit,’ ‘Harry Potter,’ Laurie Metcalf …

Tony Awards 2018: Records, milestones and fun facts about this year’s winners include ‘The Band’s Visit,’ ‘Harry Potter,’ Laurie Metcalf …
Out of all the winners (and losers) in the 26 competitive categories at the 2018 Tony Awards, several of them stand out as particularly noteworthy when considered in the context of history. So what were this year’s most interesting facts, records and milestones?

“The Band’s Visit” is the first Best Musical winner to have been based on a movie since “Kinky Boots” in 2013. Of its 11 Tony nominations it managed to win a whopping 10 awards (including Best Musical). The only prize it didn’t end up taking home was Best Scenic Design of a Musical for Scott Pask. It is now tied with “Hello, Dolly!” (1964) and “Billy Elliot” (2009) as the third most awarded production in Tony history, behind “The Producers” with 12 wins in 2001 and “Hamilton” with 11 victories in 2016.

“The Band’s Visit” is also the first Best Musical winner to have won every single acting award it was nominated for since
See full article at Gold Derby »

Christopher Lloyd to Guest Star on 'Roseanne' as Roseanne Conner's Potential Stepdad — Watch the Sneak Peek!

He's coming back to the future — as a guest star on Roseanne! Christopher Lloyd is set to appear in tonight's episode as Roseanne (played by Roseanne Barr)'s mother Beverly's boyfriend, Lou. The actor will allegedly only appear in this episode of the sitcom (although he's so beloved we could see him continuing his stint on the show). In the sneak peek for the episode, we get to see Christopher with Beverly (played by Estelle Parson). If you can recall from the original series, Bev divorced Roseanne's dad, Al Harris (played by John Randolph), after she learned he had a mistress for 20 years. He later died, but before his death, we learned he was abusive during Roseanne's childhood. Ever wonder if you're supposed to tip your driver? #Roseanne pic.twitter.com/z6t7g77g5O— Roseanne on ABC (@RoseanneOnABC) May 1, 2018 In the funny clip, Bev introduces Lou to Roseanne
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Little Murders

The blackest of black comedies confronts us with an urban worst case scenario — Jules Feiffer’s ‘social horror’ movie is like a sitcom in Hell, with citizens numbed and trembling over the unending meaningless violence. What was nasty satire in 1971 now plays like the 6 o’clock news. Too radical for its time, Feiffer and director Alan Arkin’s picture is more painfully funny, and frightening, than ever.

Little Murders

Region B Blu-ray

Powerhouse Indicator (UK)

1971 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 110 min. / Street Date April 30, 2017 / Available from Amazon UK £22.99

Starring: Elliott Gould, Marcia Rodd, Vincent Gardenia, Elizabeth Wilson, Jon Korkes, John Randolph, Doris Roberts, Lou Jacobi, Donald Sutherland, Alan Arkin, Martin Kove.

Cinematography: Gordon Willis

Film Editor: Howard Kuperman

Production Design: Gene Rudolf

Original Music: Fred Kaz

Written by Jules Feiffer from his play

Produced by Jack Brodsky (and Elliott Gould)

Directed by Alan Arkin

Little Murders was one of the first new
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Today in Soap Opera History (March 6)

1979: One Life to Live's Karen Wolek confessed her past on the

witness stand in one of the most memorable scenes in soap opera

history."Whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who ever have been, and ever shall be, animated by the same passions, and thus they necessarily have the same results."

― Machiavelli

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1927: William J. Bell, iconic soap opera writer and producer who co-created The Young and the Restless and The Bold and the Beautiful, was born. He died
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Today in Soap Opera History (February 16)

1968: Dark Shadows' Josette shocked Barnabas.

1981: Gh's Heather escaped from the sanitarium.

2009: Atwt aired a special fairy tales episode.

2009: AMC's Reese and Bianca were officially married,"Whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who ever have been, and ever shall be, animated by the same passions, and thus they necessarily have the same results."

― Machiavelli

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1966: On Another World, John Randolph (Michael M. Ryan) tried to convince his doubtful wife, Pat (Susan Trustman), that Mike
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Today in Soap Opera History (December 30)

1968: NBC daytime soap Hidden Faces premiered. 1983: Guiding

Light's Phillip and Beth spent New Year's Eve in New York.

2002: The "Surrender" arc began on Port Charles. 2003: One

Life to Live's Dorian visited All My Children's Pine Valley."History is a vast early warning system."

Norman Cousins

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1963: ABC shifted General Hospital to the 3 p.m. Et time slot after nearly 9 months of airing at 1 p.m.

1964: On Another World, Pat Matthews (Susan Trustman) refused to give John Randolph (Michael M. Ryan) permission to access her medical records.

1968: NBC daytime soap opera Hidden Faces premiered. Created by Irving Vendig, the
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Today in Soap Opera History (December 19)

1967: The Doctors' Althea turned in her resignation.

1997: General Hospital's Helena returned to Port Charles.

2008: All My Children celebrated the life of Myrtle Fargate.

2011: One Life to Live's Roxy dreamed about Fraternity Row."History is a vast early warning system."

Norman Cousins

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1966: On Peyton Place, Martin Peyton (George Macready) told a drunken Leslie Harrington (Paul Langton) that he had always been inferior.

1967: On The Doctors, Dr. Althea Davis (Elizabeth Hubbard) stopped by the home of Dr. Matt Powers (James Pritchett) to give him her official resignation from Hope Memorial Hospital. Althea was pregnant and unmarried at the time,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Today in Soap Opera History (December 16)

1966: The final episode of A Time For Us aired on ABC.

1968: David Selby debut on Dark Shadows.

1983: Chase found information about Falcon Crest in his grandfather's will.

1996: Another World's Jake planned to steal the Lassiter Christmas tree."History is a vast early warning system."

Norman Cousins

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1957: On The Edge of Night, Peter Dalton (Stephen Elliott) refused Mike Karr's (John Larkin) resignation then argued that his leaving would be a disservice to the public.

1966: ABC aired the final episode of daytime soap opera A Time For Us (formerly A Flame in the Wind), originally created by Raphael Hayes and Joseph Hardy.
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Prizzi’s Honor

Richard Condon and John Huston’s show is like a gangland version of Moonstruck, bouncing effortlessly between earnest romanticism and cynical satire. Hit man Jack Nicholson is a brass-knuckle Romeo, and Kathleen Turner’s mysterious bicoastal Juliet has nothing but surprises for him. Near the end of his career, Huston’s direction is as assured as can be.

Prizzi’s Honor

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1985 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 130 min. / Street Date August 29, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Street Date September 16, 2003 / 14.95

Starring: Jack Nicholson, Kathleen Turner, Robert Loggia, John Randolph, William Hickey, Lee Richardson, Anjelica Huston.

Cinematography: Andrzej Bartkowiak

Production Designer: Dennis Washington

Film Editors: Kaja Fehr, Rudi Fehr

Original Music: Alex North

Written by Janet Roach, Richard Condon from his novel

Produced by John Foreman

Directed by John Huston

Who said that John Huston slacked off in his later years? True, his Annie could be fairly re-titled as Gambling Debts Paid,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Pretty Poison

Psycho launched a thousand twisted sickos and pathological relationships in films, but none can best Noel Black’s fascinating, funny romance between a newly-released arsonist and a fetching high schooler, hungry for freedom and lacking a moral compass. The pairing of Anthony Perkins and Tuesday Weld is inspired.

Pretty Poison

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 89 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring Anthony Perkins, Tuesday Weld, Beverly Garland, John Randolph, Dick O’Neill, Clarice Blackburn, Joseph Bova, Ken Kercheval.

Cinematography David L. Quaid

Original Music Johnny Mandel

Written by Lorenzo Semple, Jr. from the novel She Let Him Continue by Stephen Geller

Produced by Marshall Backlar, Noel Black, Lawrence Turman

Directed by Noel Black

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Although the dates don’t match up, I’m absolutely certain that I saw Noel Black’s theatrical short Skaterdater when it was screened as a warm-up for,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "Number One" (1969) Starring Charlton Heston; MGM DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Charlton Heston fans will appreciate the fact that one of his few major films not to be released on home video has finally made it to DVD through MGM. "Number One" (released in certain countries under the title "Pro") is an off-beat vehicle for the superstar, who was then at his peak of popularity. The fact that the movie under-performed at the box-office and failed to score with critics didn't diminish Heston's status as a leading man. He would go on to star in such hits as "The Omega Man", "Skyjacked", "Soylent Green" "Earthquake", "Midway"and "Airport '75"- with cameos in the popular "The Three Musketeers" and "The Four Musketeers". The poor response to "Number One" doesn't diminish its many merits - and the fact that Heston was willing to play against type in a largely unsympathetic role. For the film, he reunited with director Tom Gries,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

‘Imitation of Life,’ ‘Being There,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ and More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2004, they’ve now reached 675 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2015 list, which includes classics such as Douglas Sirk‘s melodrama Imitation of Life, Hal Ashby‘s Being There, and John Frankenheimer‘s Seconds. Perhaps the most popular picks, The Shawshank Redemption, Ghostbusters, Top Gun, and L.A. Confidential were also added. Check out the full list below.

Being There (1979)

Chance, a simple-minded gardener (Peter Sellers) whose only contact with the outside world is through television, becomes the toast of the town following a series of misunderstandings. Forced outside his protected environment by the death of his wealthy boss, Chance subsumes his late employer’s persona,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections
Ghostbusters,” “Top Gun,” “L.A. Confidential” and “Being There” are among the Library of Congress’ 2015 selections for the National Film Registry.

Each year, the Library of Congress adds 25 notable films to its permanent collection, ensuring that the titles will be preserved for generations to come. The 2015 class is typically eclectic, ranging from silent films to 1980s blockbusters, edgy indies to educational films such as the Disney-produced 1946 entry “The Story of Menstruation.”

“Selecting a film for the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to cinema and America’s cultural and artistic history,” said acting Librarian of Congress David Mao. “The registry is an invaluable way to advance public awareness of the richness, creativity and variety of our nation’s film heritage.”

The 2015 selections bring the number of titles in the registry to 675. The films are selected by Library of Congress staffers and the National Film Preservation Board, after reviewing nominations made
See full article at Variety - Film News »

120 Essential Horror Scenes Part 7: Meltdowns

If the transformation is a character’s external change then the meltdown is the internal equivalent. Sometimes the most terrifying part of a horror film isn’t when the monster pops out, but when a character loses his or her grip on reality. The psychosis can begin gradually, exacerbated by stress, sickness, or an outside tormentor. Often the character begins a film in complete control of his or her mental faculties. But control is a relative term, and in a horror film, the illusion of control can be just as powerful as actual agency. The options: denial or embracement. The psychological break will come soon enough. The only question is, how broken will the person be once it does?

****

Alien (1979) – Ash malfunctions

The crew of the cargo ship Nostromo has just about had it. Awakened from a cozy hypersleep to answer the worst wrong number in interstellar history, they then
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Self/Less – The Review

Body/mind transference, the central idea behind the thriller Self/Less, is so flush with opportunity that it’s frustrating to see this new movie fly off the rails so early and so completely. Self/Less has the premise for thought-provoking science-fiction, but it doesn’t have the gumption. It would rather be a blockbuster than a mind-bender but it turns out to be neither. Ben Kingsley stars as Damian Hale, a miserly real-estate magnate at death’s door who pays a quarter million dollars for the services of the shadowy corporation known as ‘Phoenix Biogenics’ (we know he’s rich because he’s shown in his Trump-style penthouse complete with solid gold doors and bannister). Albright (Matthew Goode), Phoenix’s spiffy young chief, offers his clients ‘Shedding’, a process of transferring the mind from the old and sick body into a healthy younger human grown organically in their lab.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Film Review: ‘Self/less’

Film Review: ‘Self/less’
A brand new you that just might be the old someone else is the quandary at the center of “Self/less,” an initially intriguing parable about man’s lust for immortality that quickly devolves into a substandard shoot-’em-up designed to rebrand star Ryan Reynolds as a brawny action hero in the Jason Statham mold. But even the resourceful, likable Reynolds is at a loss to elevate this rather dreary piece of would-be escapism, which calls out for the wry, pulpy touch of a John Carpenter (or his acolyte David Twohy) and instead gets the strained self-seriousness of director Tarsem Singh. July 10 release from Universal/Focus’ relaunched genre label Gramercy Pictures will have its work cut out for it against the big guns of summer.

Written by Spanish brothers Alex and David Pastor (whose little-seen 2009 “Carriers” was one of the better zombie/virus thrillers of recent vintage), “Self/less” cribs
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Do audiences want quality movies? L.A. Earthquake Flick to Pass Domestic $100M Mark Today

'San Andreas' movie with Dwayne Johnson. 'San Andreas' movie box office: $100 million domestic milestone today As the old saying (sort of) goes: If you build it, they will come. Warner Bros. built a gigantic video game, called it San Andreas, and They have come to check out Dwayne Johnson perform miraculous deeds not seen since ... George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, released two weeks earlier. Embraced by moviegoers, hungry for quality, original storylines and well-delineated characters – and with the assistance of 3D surcharges – the San Andreas movie debuted with $54.58 million from 3,777 theaters on its first weekend out (May 29-31) in North America. Down a perfectly acceptable 52 percent on its second weekend (June 5-7), the special effects-laden actioner collected an extra $25.83 million, trailing only the Melissa McCarthy-Jason Statham comedy Spy, (with $29.08 million) as found at Box Office Mojo.* And that's how this original movie – it's not officially a remake,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Influential Cult Classic Filmmaker Black Dead at 77: Worked with Perkins, Redgrave, Mitchum

Cult movie classic ‘Pretty Poison’ filmmaker Noel Black dead at 77 (photo: Tuesday Weld and Anthony Perkins in ‘Pretty Poison’) Noel Black, best remembered for the 1968 cult movie classic Pretty Poison, died of pneumonia at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital on July 5, 2014. Black (born on June 30, 1937, in Chicago) was 77. Prior to Pretty Poison, Noel Black earned praise for the 18-minute short film Skaterdater (1965), the tale of a boy skateboarder who falls for a girl bike rider. Shot on the beaches of Los Angeles County, the dialogue-less Skaterdater went on to win the Palme d’Or for Best Short Film and tied with Orson WellesFalstaff - Chimes at Midnight for the Technical Grand Prize at the 1966 Cannes Film Festival. Besides, Skaterdater received an Academy Award nomination in the Best Short Subject, Live Action category. (The Oscar winner that year was Claude Berri’s Le Poulet.) ‘Pretty Poison’: Fun and games and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Updates Paranoia Classic ‘Seconds’

Chicago – John Frankenheimer’s “Seconds” with Rock Hudson was considered an unusual choice for The Criterion Collection when it was announced earlier this year. Never before available on Blu-ray and discontinued on DVD, the 4K restoration on this edition is the real draw, especially given that the film’s strength lies in its stunning visual compositions. With its canted angles and fish bowl aesthetic, Frankenheimer enhances what is actually a relatively weak script.

Seconds” is a film that I want to adore given my love for the filmmaker’s other works (especially “The Manchurian Candidate,” another ode to ’60s paranoia) and how I love well-written “Twilight Zone”-esque tales, but repeat viewing of this release reveals the film to be thematically thinner than it should be. There are some great ideas here about personality, success, and apathy but they’re not explored and the final twist is one that modern
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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