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Garbo Talks When Camille Screens for Free April 27th at Webster University

“When one may not have long to live, why shouldn’t one have fancies?”

Camille (1936) screens Friday April 27th at 7:30 at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood) as part of its St. Louis Earth Day Film Series. This is a Free screening and is co-sponsored by Opera Theater of Saint Louis. A post-film question and answer session will be lead by Cliff Froehlich, executive director, Cinema St. Louis

One of Greta Garbo’s best performances on-screen (especially the ending) can be witnessed in the essential romance drama Camille (1936). She plays Marguerite Gautier, a kept woman (by Henry Daniell) that falls in love with another a young admirer played by the dashing Robert Taylor. Lionel Barrymore plays Taylor’s stern father; Jessie Ralph (among others) also appears. Directed by George Cukor it’s based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas’s son and features a screenplay by Zoe Akins Frances Marion and James Hilton.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Three Tall Women’: Glenda Jackson could finally win a Tony to go alongside her Oscars and Emmys

‘Three Tall Women’: Glenda Jackson could finally win a Tony to go alongside her Oscars and Emmys
With a pair of Oscars and a pair of Emmys under her belt, Glenda Jackson is only a Tony Award away from completing the Triple Crown of acting. And that could change this June as Jackson makes her eagerly anticipated return to Broadway in a revival of Edward Albee‘s “Three Tall Women.”

Jackson lost all four of her previous Tony Awards bids: “The Persecution and Assassination of Marat, as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton, Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade” (1966); “Rose” (1981); “Strange Interlude” (1985); and “Macbeth” (1988). She retired from acting in 1992 and served as a Member of Parliament in the House of Commons until 2015. Since then, she has dipped her toe back into acting and was nominated for an Olivier Award in 2017 for her work in the title role of “King Lear.”

In “Three Tall Women,” which won the 1994 Pulitzer Prize in Drama, Jackson
See full article at Gold Derby »

Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be fifth double Best Actress Oscar champ with a 2-0 record

Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be fifth double Best Actress Oscar champ with a 2-0 record
Not only will Frances McDormand become the 14th person with multiple Best Actress Oscars if she wins for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” Sunday, but she’ll join an even more exclusive group that not even Meryl Streep or Katharine Hepburn are part of: Best Actress winners with a perfect record after multiple nominations.

The 1996 champ for “Fargo,” McDormand would be the fifth person with a 2-0 record in Best Actress following Luise Rainer (1936’s “The Great Ziegfeld,” 1937’s “The Good Earth”), Vivien Leigh (1939’s “Gone with the Wind,” 1951’s “A Streetcar Named Desire”), Sally Field (1979’s “Norma Rae,” 1984’s “Places of the Heart”) and Hilary Swank (1999’s “Boys Don’t Cry,” 2004’s “Million Dollar Baby”).

See Hardly a Sophie’s choice: Meryl Streep is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner

However, like Field, McDormand’s overall Oscar record isn’t pristine: She’s lost three supporting bids for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films
In 2009 — when the Academy Awards went to 10 Best Picture nominees for the first time since 1943 — the preferential system of voting, which had been used from 1934 to 1945, was reintroduced. The academy did so as it believed this “best allows the collective judgment of all voting members to be most accurately represented.”

We have detailed how the preferential voting system works at the Oscars in the modern era. So, let’s take a look back at those dozen years early in the history of the academy when it first used this complicated counting to determine the Best Picture winner rather than a simple popular vote. (At the bottom of this post, be sure to vote for the film that you think will take the top Oscar this year.)

See Best Picture Gallery: Every winner of the top Academy Award

1934

This seventh ceremony marked the first time that the Oscars eligibility period was the calendar year.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hardly a Sophie’s choice: Meryl Streep is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner [Poll Results]

Hardly a Sophie’s choice: Meryl Streep is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner [Poll Results]
Meryl Streep’s twin wins are twice as nice for you. With 36 percent of the vote, Streep beat out her 13 fellow multiple Best Actress Oscar winners in our poll asking for your favorite.

“Meryl Streep is the most versatile, amazing actress of my lifetime,” user John K. commented.

Streep is the most recent multiple Best Actress champ, winning for “The Iron Lady” (2011) 29 years after her first triumph for “Sophie’s Choice” (1982). But she’ll lose that title this weekend if Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) wins as expected.

See 2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins

Way back in second place was Vivien Leigh, who earned 15 percent of the vote. “Vivien Leigh is the only one where both victories was my top choice in the years they won,” user Jay DeFelice wrote of her “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951) wins.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner? [Poll]

Who is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner? [Poll]
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) is a few weeks away from becoming one of 14 women who’ve won more than one Best Actress Oscar. McDormand, who took home the prize for “Fargo” (1996), would join 12 other women as two-time winners, two shy of Katharine Hepburn’s all-time record of four. Before McDormand joins this elite club, which of the first lucky 13 champs is your favorite?

Luise Rainer was the first actress to win two and the first performer to win back-to-back Oscars, triumphing for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937). Bette Davis (1935’s “Dangerous” and 1938’s “Jezebel”) joined her the following year. Eleven years later, Davis’ pal Olivia de Havilland won her second Oscar for 1949’s “The Heiress,” three years after her “To Each His Own” victory.

Two years after that, Vivien Leigh, who first took home the award for “Gone with the Wind” (1939), won for “A Streetcar Named Desire
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Best Picture & Best Actress have gone hand-in-hand only 7 times in 75 years – will they match again?

  • Gold Derby
Oscars 2018: Best Picture & Best Actress have gone hand-in-hand only 7 times in 75 years – will they match again?
This year’s Oscars are unique in how much more female-driven the Best Picture nominees are. Five out of the nine contenders in the top category have female leads, and four of the Best Actress nominees are in films that are also up for the top award: Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water“), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”) and Meryl Streep (“The Post”). If one of those films wins both Best Picture and Best Actress, it would be only the 8th to pair those up in the last 75 years.

In the last three-quarters of a century the seven Best Picture/Best Actress match-ups were as follows:

1975 — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and lead actress Louise Fletcher

1977 — “Annie Hall” and lead actress Diane Keaton

1983 — “Terms of Endearment” and lead actress Shirley MacLaine

1989 — “Driving Miss Daisy” and lead actress Jessica Tandy

1991 — “The Silence of the Lambs
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be 14th two-time Best Actress winner

Oscars 2018: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be 14th two-time Best Actress winner
No acting category at the Oscars has had more repeat winners than Best Actress, with 13 performers claiming two or more statues. Now Frances McDormand is in a strong position to add her name to that list for her performance in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” As of this writing McDormand leads our predictions with odds of 2/13 based on the combined forecasts of more than 3,400 users who have entered their picks at Gold Derby. If our predictions prove true, McDormand would join the following repeat champs:

Ingrid Bergman: “Gaslight” (1944) and “Anastasia” (1956)

Bette Davis: “Dangerous” (1935) and “Jezebel” (1938)

Olivia de Havilland: “To Each His Own” (1946) and “The Heiress” (1949)

Sally Field: “Norma Rae” (1979) and “Places in the Heart” (1984)

Jane Fonda: “Klute” (1971) and “Coming Home” (1978)

Jodie Foster: “The Accused” (1988) and “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991)

Katharine Hepburn: “Morning Glory” (1933), “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” (1967), “The Lion in Winter
See full article at Gold Derby »

The politically incorrect Oscars: 9 white actors who were recognized for playing minorities

After two straight years of all-white acting nominees in 2015 and 2016, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences responded to the #OscarsSoWhite issue by inviting a far more diverse and younger field of talent both behind and in front of the camera to join. And though there are miles to go until there is true diversity, the academy’s nominees and winners are beginning to reflect our culture.

Last year, “Moonlight” became the first Best Picture winner with an all-black cast. Its director Barry Jenkins shared the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar with Tarell Alvin McCraney, while Mahershala Ali won Best Supporting Actor. Viola Davis also took home Best Supporting Actress for “Fences.”

This year’s black nominees include Jordan Peele, a triple nominee for producing, directing and writing Best Picture contender “Get Out,” which also scored a Best Actor nomination for Daniel Kaluuya. Two-time winner Denzel Washington is nominated for “Roman J.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘You Are My Friend’: Will Tom Hanks finally earn Oscar nomination #6 for Mr. Rogers biopic after 17 years of snubs?

  • Gold Derby
‘You Are My Friend’: Will Tom Hanks finally earn Oscar nomination #6 for Mr. Rogers biopic after 17 years of snubs?
The last time Tom Hanks was nominated for an Oscar, George W. Bush had just been sworn in as President of the United States, “Hannibal” was the #1 movie in the country and “Survivor: The Australian Outback” was TV’s most-watched show. Hanks’ fifth career Oscar nomination for “Cast Away” at the 2001 ceremony was a whopping 17 years ago, but with this week’s news that he’s set to star in a biopic of Mr. Rogers‘ life titled “You Are My Friend,” might he finally earn nom #6?

Since Hanks’ last Oscar bid five of his movies have been nominated for Best Picture, yet he was overlooked for all of them including most recently “The Post.” Hanks’ snub for “The Post” is particularly head-scratching when you consider that his co-star Meryl Streep just earned her 21st Oscar nomination for the film. Plus, Hanks’ performance as Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee received bids
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Denzel Washington, Meryl Streep, Octavia Spencer are 14th acting group scoring back-to-back nominations

Oscars 2018: Denzel Washington, Meryl Streep, Octavia Spencer are 14th acting group scoring back-to-back nominations
Among this year’s 20 actors to earn Oscar nominations are Denzel Washington, Meryl Streep and Octavia Spencer, up for their turns in “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”; “The Post”; and “The Shape of Water,” respectively. Washington, Streep and Spencer mark the trio of actors to this year earn consecutive Oscar nominations, having last year been up for “Fences,” “Florence Foster Jenkins,” and “Hidden Figures.” Their achievement marks the 14th occasion in Oscar history in which three or more actors have returned as nominees the following ceremony.

SEEOscars 2018: Nominations in All 24 Categories

In the early days of the Oscars, consecutive acting nominations were commonplace. From 1936 to 1947, there were eight occasions of this nature. Let’s take a look back at those years:

1936 and 1937 (Paul Muni, Spencer Tracy, Luise Rainer, Irene Dunne and Alice Brady)

1939 and 1940 (Laurence Olivier, James Stewart and Bette Davis)

1940 and 1941 (Bette Davis, Joan Fontaine and Walter Brennan)

1941 and 1942 (Gary Cooper,
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins

2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins
After victories at the Golden Globes, Critics’ Choice and Screen Actors Guild Awards, Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) is the odds-on favorite to join a select group of women: performers who’ve won at least two Best Actress Oscars. McDormand would be the 14th to do so and perhaps most impressively, her double would be the third longest timespan between first and second wins.

McDormand won her first Oscar for “Fargo” a whoppin’ 21 years ago — that’s a whole person who can drink! She’d be behind only Meryl Streep (“Sophie’s Choice,” “The Iron Lady”), who waited 29 years, and Katharine Hepburn (“Morning Glory,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”), who holds the record at 34 years.

Most two-time Best Actress winners garner their second statuette within a decade of their first, usually within the first five years in that “honeymoon period” when, to paraphrase one double champ, they like you,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Iraq invasion in 2003 almost cancelled 75th anniversary Oscars family album reunion of 59 acting winners [Watch]

The 75th anniversary ceremony for the Academy Awards almost didn’t happen as scheduled. When America led an invasion of Iraq that weekend, broadcast network ABC pleaded with producer Gil Cates and Academy president Frank Piersen to move the event back a week. The duo claimed it would be too expensive to make the switch and that the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood would be unavailable.

On March 23, 2003, the ceremony went live on ABC as scheduled, hosted by comedian, actor, and writer Steve Martin, with the Best Picture proclaimed to be “Chicago.” However, several presenters such as Cate Blanchett, Jim Carrey, and Will Smith cancelled their appearances. That day’s events also caused several past winners to bail out on appearing in the Oscars family album slated for late in the show. Similar to a segment five years early for the 70th anniversary show (read more on the link above), the
See full article at Gold Derby »

On This Day: Globes for two goddesses. Plus a non-jolly green giant

On this day in history as it relates to showbiz...

1892  One of Old Hollywood's most undersung but talented 1930s directors Gregory La Cava is born. Classics include Stage Door and My Man Godfrey

1913 Famed abolitionist and American hero Harriet Tubman dies of pneumonia. So glad she's getting biopic treatment soon. And twice over!

1938 The 10th annual Oscars are held with The Life of Emile Zzzzzola winning Best Picture and Louise Rainer taking her consecutive Best Actress prize but the most enduring anecdote was of course the theft of Alice Brady's Oscar for In Old Chicago.

1958 Sharon Stone is born in Pennysylvania

The 1959 Golden Globes (and more) are after the jump...
See full article at FilmExperience »

11 Actresses Who Earned Oscar Nods for Musicals

11 Actresses Who Earned Oscar Nods for Musicals
La La Land garnered a record-tying 14 Academy Award nominations this year — it’s now neck-and-neck with Titanic and All About Eve for receiving the most Oscar nominations in a given year. Among those nods is a first-ever Best Actress nom for Emma Stone, who’s been racking up rave reviews for her performance in the film.

While we’ve got musicals on the mind, let’s take a look back at some other actresses who’ve received acclaim for their musical turns.

Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables (2012)

Hathaway’s turn as Fantine was the only non-technical award the 2012 adaptation of the smash musical picked up.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Oscars: How Often Do Musicals Result in Best Actor and Best Actress Nominations and Wins?

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in ‘La La Land’ (Courtesy: Lionsgate)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

Not only is La La Land breaking records as the most-nominated musical in Oscar history but that haul of 14 nominations for its lead pair, Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling. Musicals don’t often get that much love from the Academy Awards and getting recognition in both the best actor and best actress categories is even rarer. Let’s take a look back at the history of this happening and see how Stone and Gosling’s nominations — and potential wins — are important.

Taking a look at this year’s nominations, Stone is favored to win more than Gosling is for their work in the Damien Chazelle-directed musical. Gosling is up against Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea), Andrew Garfield (Hacksaw Ridge), Viggo Mortensen (Captain Fantastic), and Denzel Washington (Fences) — with the latter expected to reign supreme.
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

29 Days until Oscar

29 is the number of the day. It's also the most common age for Best Actress winners. That's quite something if you consider that the youngest best actor winner of all time was 29 and just a month shy of his 30th (Adrien Brody, The Pianist). The gender bias that preferences young actresses and older men gets even worse when you realize that Half of all Best Actress winners won by the age of 33. Less than 10% of Best Actor winners were 33 and under. The eight women who won at 29 are...

Emma Stone is the youngest Best Actress nominee this year at 28 and expected to win by most pundits. Stone is the same age now as the following winners were: Norma Shearer in The Divorcee, Joanne Woodward in The Three Faces of Eve, Luise Rainer in The Good Earth and Charlize Theron in Monster.

Curiously there is no "most common age" for Best
See full article at FilmExperience »

Oscars: How Do Leading Ladies From Musicals Fare in the Best Actress Category?

Emma Stone in ‘La La Land’ (Courtesy: Lionsgate)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

Emma Stone is poised to do something very historic this year if she takes home the best actress Oscar for La La Land. The history of leading ladies from musicals in this category isn’t that long and, should the 28-year-old win — as critics are predicting even considering Natalie Portman in Jackie — it would be an occurrence we haven’t seen for quite some time.

In the Damien Chazelle-directed flick, Stone plays an aspiring actress named Mia opposite Ryan Gosling as a jazz musician named Sebastian — their third time playing love interests after 2011’s Crazy, Stupid, Love and 2013’s Gangster Squad. As these two fall in love amid their struggle to make it in Los Angeles, their individual quests for fame begin to pull them apart.

The other frontrunners to give Stone competition for best actress
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Rip: Lupita Tovar & Robert Vaughn

Didn't mean to let these two farewells slip by.

After the death of Luise Rainer, Lupita Tovar held the title of 'The Oldest Living Screen Star of Note' for a few years. She died Sunday at the 106 years of age so here's to enduring genes. The Mexican actress's original claim to fame was starring in the Spanish version of the famous horror picture Dracula (1931). Though her last movie was in 1945 she continued to affect the movies via her gene pool...
See full article at FilmExperience »
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