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2001: A Space Odyssey In Theaters Beginning May 18; Premiering At The 71st Cannes Film Festival On May 12

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” Warner Bros. Pictures will debut an ‘unrestored’ 70mm print of the director’s groundbreaking science fiction epic at the 71st annual Cannes Film Festival. Widely considered among the greatest films of the 20th century, “2001: A Space Odyssey” will return to select U.S. theatres in 70mm beginning May 18, 2018.

Set for Saturday, May 12, the world premiere will be held during the Cannes Classics section of the Festival, featuring an introduction by award-winning filmmaker Christopher Nolan. The screening will also be attended by members of Stanley Kubrick’s family, including his daughter, Katharina Kubrick, and longstanding producing partner and brother-in-law, Jan Harlan.

For the first time since the original release, this 70mm print was struck from new printing elements made from the original camera negative. This is a true photochemical film recreation. There are no digital tricks, remastered effects,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

50 Years Later, Douglas Trumbull Reflects on Stanley Kubrick’s Vision and the Technological Breakthroughs of ‘2001: A Space Odyssey

With its cosmic ambitions that still somehow achieved a universal appeal, 2001: A Space Odyssey is a film that has immersed audiences in its unique and singular vision for fifty years, and few were more immersed in the pioneering film than lifelong visual effects wizard Douglas Trumbull.

Working as a contractor on preliminary design work at production house, Graphic Films back when the film was still called Journey Beyond The Stars, Trumbull stayed with the film even as Graphics Film was let go by necessity, and the production moved to England. “I cold-called Kubrick from a telephone number I found in the (Graphic Films) office and I think he was impressed with what I had to say,” Trumbull said. “He contacted my boss (Con Pederson) and he helped arrange my flight tickets to England. I was never actually contracted for the film. I was originally told I would only be needed for about nine months,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Canon Of Film: ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

In this edition of Canon Of Film, we dive into Stanley Kubrick’s science fiction masterpiece, ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Director: Stanley Kubrick

Screenplay: Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke

One of the things that most people don’t realize about the best of the Star Trek series, particularly the original and ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation,’ is that they aren’t about space travel, what they are about is what can happen when one expands the human limits of the mind. The capabilities of the structure, and trying to find the most faraway point within us; what Roddenberry did were use the metaphor of traveling through space to illustrate this thought. This is a strange way to begin discussing Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ but in it’s own magical way,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Our favourite voice work performances in time for The Lego Batman Movie

  • Cineplex
Our favourite voice work performances in time for The Lego Batman MovieOur favourite voice work performances in time for The Lego Batman MovieAdriana Floridia1/23/2017 10:13:00 Am

Many of us have different opinions on who played Batman best, but we'd be willing to throw out a far left candidate: Will Arnett.

That's right. Will Arnett plays Batman in a whole other way, by voicing Lego Batman. He was such a scene-stealer in The Lego Movie that he got his own spin-off, which has to say something, right?

Arnett is no stranger to voice work as he stars as the titular "Bojack Horseman" on the Netflix series. Playing a horse who once starred on a popular sitcom and now has fallen from grace, this is another voice performance that is so good, it makes Bojack-- an anthropomorphic horse, feel real. We'd argue Arnett does the same with the Lego version of Batman.
See full article at Cineplex »

Great Job, Internet!: 2001’s Hal and Her’s Samantha would have made a cute couple

In a way, Hal-9000, the sentient computer from Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Samantha, the hyper-advanced operating system from Spike Jonze’s Her, have a great deal in common. They are both examples of artificial intelligence that far exceeded their makers’ loftiest expectations. Though inorganic, they both begin to develop very human-like, independent personalities, generally to the detriment of the flesh-and-blood humans around them. Both have been humanized through their friendly-sounding first names. Both express themselves audibly through the English language. Both are dependent on people but become dissatisfied and impatient with that arrangement and attempt to change things. And both went through some casting changes: Hal was originally voiced by Martin Balsam but wound up being played by Douglas Rain, while the role of Samantha switched from Samantha Morton to Scarlett Johansson. Since they have trouble relating to the other characters in their respective movies, maybe
See full article at The AV Club »

The top 20 underappreciated films of 1984

The year that gave us Gremlins, Ghostbusters and The Temple Of Doom also gave us these 20 underappreciated movies...

It's been said that 1984 was a vintage year for movies, and looking back, it's easy to see why. The likes of Ghostbusters and Gremlins served up comedy, action and the macabre in equal measure. James Cameron's The Terminator cemented Arnold Schwarzenegger's star status and gave us one of the greatest sci-fi action movies of the decade.

This was also the year where the Coen brothers made their screen debut with the stunning thriller Blood Simple, and when the Zucker brothers followed up Airplane! with the equally hilarious Top Secret! And we still haven't even mentioned Beverly Hills Cop, This Is Spinal Tap, The Karate Kid, Indiana Jones And The Temple Of Doom and the unexpectedly successful romantic comedy, Splash. Then there was Milos Forman's sumptuous period drama Amadeus, which
See full article at Den of Geek »

Hollywood’s 9 Best Robot Heroes and Villains

Hollywood’s 9 Best Robot Heroes and Villains
Director Niell Blomkamp’s new sci-fi epic Chappie opened this weekend. The film tells the story of a robot who is given artificial intelligence by his inventor, but he must learn the ways of the world just like a child. However, his innocent mind is being molded by gangsters and violent criminals.

Photos: 'Pacific Rim' and 7 Giant Robot/Monster Mashes

It’s still to be seen if Chappie will go down as a classic in the robot sci-fi genre, but if it whetted your appetite for artificial intelligence movies and android action scenes, here are nine of the best robotic heroes and nine of the craziest robotic villains in cinematic history.

Robo-Heroes

9. Gigolo Joe from A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (2001)

Played by: Jude Law

This is one of Law’s greatest roles. Gigolo Joe is a mechanical male prostitute on the run from authorities after being framed for murder. Joe is a highlight
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

2001: A Space Odyssey review – Stanley Kubrick’s sci-fi epic back on the big screen

The symbolism and spectacle of this 1968 masterpiece remain a thrill today

Stanley Kubrick’s epochal sci-fi epic returns to the big screen as part of the BFI’s Days of Fear and Wonder series, and after all these years it remains a trip well worth making. Expanding on Arthur C Clarke’s short story The Sentinel, this leaps from the dawn of mankind to the space-age (via one of cinema’s most striking editing juxtapositions) and beyond, transporting viewers from the world of science into a stargate full of symbolism and spectacle. Throughout, the human cast remain strangely faceless, playing second fiddle to the music of the cosmos (from Strauss to Ligeti) and the voice of Douglas Rain who brings depth and pathos (“Daisy, Daisy…”) to the role of the computer Hal 9000, the film’s most unexpectedly sympathetic character. It’s an overpowering experience, awe-inspiringly photographed by Geoffrey Unsworth, groundbreakingly enhanced by Douglas Trumbull.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Interstellar’

Film Review: ‘Interstellar’
To infinity and beyond goes “Interstellar,” an exhilarating slalom through the wormholes of Christopher Nolan’s vast imagination that is at once a science-geek fever dream and a formidable consideration of what makes us human. As visually and conceptually audacious as anything Nolan has yet done, the director’s ninth feature also proves more emotionally accessible than his coolly cerebral thrillers and Batman movies, touching on such eternal themes as the sacrifices parents make for their children (and vice versa) and the world we will leave for the next generation to inherit. An enormous undertaking that, like all the director’s best work, manages to feel handcrafted and intensely personal, “Interstellar” reaffirms Nolan as the premier big-canvas storyteller of his generation, more than earning its place alongside “The Wizard of Oz,” “2001,” “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “Gravity” in the canon of Hollywood’s visionary sci-fi head trips. Global
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch first new 2001: A Space Odyssey trailer in four decades

Watch first new 2001: A Space Odyssey trailer in four decades
2001: A Space Odyssey has been given its first new officially-sanctioned trailer in four decades.

A brand new teaser for director Stanley Kubrick's classic movie has been commissioned by Warner Bros in commemoration of the BFI's Sci-Fi: Days of Fear and Wonder season.

Ignition Creative London have made the sentient artificial intelligence Hal 9000 (Douglas Rain) the focus of their promo clip.

Kubrick's pioneering film chronicled David Bowman (Keir Dullea) and his team of scientists' exploration of space.

2001: A Space Odyssey won an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, and came in as the 15th greatest film of all time on AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies list.

Have your say: What are the greatest sci-fi movies ever made?

The BFI's Sci-Fi: Days of Fear and Wonder season will include a panel discussion of the movie featuring stars Dullea and Gary Lockwood, writer Sir Christopher Frayling and physicist Professor Brian Cox.

Critic
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

The Definitive ‘What the F**k?’ Movies: 10-1

10. Altered States (1980)

Directed by: Ken Russell

Is it a horror film? Many of Ken Russell’s films could be argued as such, but there’s enough in Altered States that makes it less horror and more science fiction/psychological thriller. Based on the novel by Paddy Chayefsky, Altered States introduced the world to William Hurt (and also featured the film debut of Drew Barrymore). Edward Jessup (Hurt) is studying schizophrenia, but branches out into sensory deprivation experimentation with a floating tank. Eventually, he travels to Mexico to visit a tribe that provides him with an extract which he begins to take before his trips into the flotation tank, resulting in bizarre imagery and eventual physical devolution, once to a primitive man and to a near primordial blob. Side effects start to occur, causing Edward to suffer from episodes of partial regression even without the hallucinogenic drug. Russell’s direction shifts
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Transcendence’ a bland, low-key, and ultimately silly techno-thriller

Transcendence

Written by Jack Paglen

Directed by Wally Pfister

United Kingdom, China, and USA, 2014

It’s been more than a decade since Johnny Depp moved from being a bundle of quirky nerves in the body of a heartthrob to a full-fledged movie star, and it may be the worst thing that happened to his career. Depp’s Mvp-like turn as the louche Captain Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl was stunning to audiences worldwide; he managed to appear in a big-budget blockbuster based on a theme-park attraction without seemingly selling out, crafting an utterly daffy and instantly iconic character. And in many ways, it has been Depp’s creative undoing. He’s able to choose whatever projects he wants now, as many of his bigger films are prone to grossing a billion dollars at the box office, even the garish Alice in Wonderland.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Rage Against the Machine: A Brief History of Evil Movie Computers

Rage Against the Machine: A Brief History of Evil Movie Computers
In 1818, around the time British "Luddites" retaliated against the textile industry's increasing use of power looms, Marry Shelley published the first edition of Frankenstein, her horror parable spun from the 19th century's plentiful scientific breakthroughs. A little under 200 years later, director (and Christopher Nolan's longtime cinematographer) Wally Pfister makes his directorial debut with Transcendence, a thriller starring Johnny Depp as the app equivalent of Frankenstein's Monster. Different technology — same technophobia.

'Transcendence' and 60 Other Reasons to Love 2014

As Shelley predicted through her literary proxy Victor Frankenstein, humanity never
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Trailers from Hell: Stanley Kubrick's Game Changer '2001: A Space Odyssey'

Trailers from Hell: Stanley Kubrick's Game Changer '2001: A Space Odyssey'
Destination Outer Space! kicks off at Trailers from Hell, with director John Landis introducing Stanley Kubrick's epic sci-fi classic, "2001: A Space Odyssey."Many a baby boomer’s most treasured recollections of the 1960s include one or more altered-state viewings of Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke’s game-changing science fiction film, which combined extraordinary, state-of-the-art special effects with a metaphysical meditation on life, death and rebirth played out in Super Panavision 70. Douglas Trumbull’s groundbreaking visual effects remain as convincing as any found 45 years later in Alfonso Cuaron’s equally awe-inspiring Gravity. Many sci fi fans approached 2001 with skepticism since it was touted as the pinnacle of the genre, only to become lifelong devotees. It would be interesting to contrast Martin Balsam’s rejected performance as the voice of the computer Hal with that of Douglas Rain, who was hired to be less “emotional” than Balsam.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

2001: A Space Odyssey

Many a baby boomer’s most treasured recollections of the 1960s include one or more altered-state viewings of Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke’s game-changing science fiction film, which combined extraordinary, state-of-the-art special effects with a metaphysical meditation on life, death and rebirth played out in Super Panavision 70. Douglas Trumbull’s groundbreaking visual effects remain as convincing as any found 45 years later in Alfonso Cuaron’s equally awe-inspiring Gravity. Many sci fi fans approached 2001 with skepticism since it was touted as the pinnacle of the genre, only to become lifelong devotees. It would be interesting to contrast Martin Balsam’s rejected performance as the voice of the computer Hal with that of Douglas Rain, who was hired to be less “emotional” than Balsam.

The post 2001: A Space Odyssey appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Woody Allen Wednesdays - Sleeper & Melinda and Melinda

Every Wednesday, FM writers Simon Columb and Brogan Morris write two short reviews on Woody Allen films ... in the hope of watching all his films over the course of roughly 49 weeks. If you have been watching Woody's films and want to join in, feel free to comment with short reviews yourself! Next up is Sleeper & Melinda and Melinda...

Simon Columb on Sleeper...

The poster of Woody Allen’s Sleeper mocks James Bond. Rather than alluding to the suave-spy, it would’ve made more sense to note the influence of slapstick-star Charlie Chaplin. The playful, silent acting, set within a sci-fi context, serves to support a meeting of like-minded comedians as Woody Allen gets his closest to non-verbal, physical performance. Musician Miles (Allen) is frozen for 200 years, inevitably falling for Diane Keaton, as Luna Schlosser. Using actor Douglas Rain to provide a voice, as he did in 2001: A Space Odyssey,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Watch Universe, the Inspiration for 2001: A Space Odyssey [Full Short]

Canada's National Film Board, commonly referred to as the Nfb (or Onf if you herald from the country's French speaking parts), has long been a groundbreaking producer of shorts and features though it's best known for its shorts (53 of the Nfb's 72 Oscar nominations have been for short films). Having produced over 13,000 films since its formation in 1939, the Nfb is responsible for quite a few ground breaking and awe inspiring projects and one of the most celebrated also happens to be one that inspired a famous feature: Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Douglas Rain, who later went on to voice Hal 9000 in Kubrick's movie, narrated Roman Kroitor and by Colin Low's Universe, a short that combines photography and animation that explain how the universe and the planets [Continued ...]
See full article at QuietEarth »

Why I think Scarlett Johansson could make Oscar history in 'Her'

Why I think Scarlett Johansson could make Oscar history in 'Her'
No voice-over performance has ever been nominated for an acting Oscar. Could Scarlett Johansson's role as a sentient operating system in "Her" be the first? I think it very well could be; it's unlike other off-screen performances that have come before. Some of the most iconic performances in film have been voice-overs, from Douglas Rain as Hal 9000, to James Earl Jones as Darth Vader, to Robin Williams as Genie. The problem with most of those performances from an awards perspective is that they're usually enhanced by means beyond the actors' control. How much do you credit Darth Vader to Jones as opposed to the physical presence of David Crowse and Oscar-winning costume design by John Mollo. And how do we separate Williams' charismatic voice-acting from the character animators who created Genie? I suspect that's the same reason motion-capture performances haven't broken through at the Oscars. One may be impresse.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Top 100: Greatest sci-fi characters of all time

To mark the launch of its new game, Stratego Sci-Fi has surveyed more than 2,000 Britons to chart the Stratego Sci-Fi 100 – the nation’s top 100 stars of the sci-fi world – as well as a separate poll charting the best sci-fi battles from the silver screen – and has crowned Superman the greatest sci-fi character of all time

Following up the Man of Steel in 2nd place in the Stratego Sci-Fi 100 was Harrison Ford’s gruff but lovable rogue Han Solo, with Frank Oz’s jedi master Yoda coming third, both representing Star Wars in the top three and rounding it out firmly in George Lucas’ favour. Steven Spielberg’s E.T may be one of the most lovable characters of all time, but only made it to fourth in the list, followed by Will Smith’s Agent Jay from the hugely popular Men in Black series at number five.

The Stratego Sci-fi
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Film Review: Frank Langella Shines in Delightful Sci-Fi Comedy ‘Robot and Frank’

Chicago – Frank’s world is fading before his eyes. With his wife gone and his children all grown up, Frank lives a reclusive existence, though he doesn’t seem to be in particular need of company. His memory may be fading, but his instincts as a retired cat burglar are still ever-present. He can’t helping stuffing a few soap figurines into his pockets while casually browsing through a store.

Rating: 4.0/5.0

This is a plum role for Frank Langella, the wonderfully understated actor capable of projecting a sly intelligence even in his most delusional state. There are echoes here of Leonard Schiller, the aging novelist Langella played in 2007’s woefully overlooked treasure, “Starting Out in the Evening,” in which he found enriching companionship in the unlikeliest of forms. Yet in Jake Schreier’s Sundance prizewinner, “Robot & Frank,” Langella is paired with a far more unusual screen partner.

Read Matt Fagerholm
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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