News

"Blue Estate : Survival Instinct" - February 8, 2012

  • SneakPeek
Image Comics' "Blue Estate" #9, available February 8, 2012, is written by Viktor Kalvachev and Andrew Osborne, with illustrations by Kalvachev, Tony Cypress, Nathan Fox and a cover by Kalvachev :

"...in 'Survival Instinct', bullets fly when uneasy allies face off against ruthless villains. See who gets iced, who turns up the heat and who fancies a toss in a Hollywood hot tub..."

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"Blue Estate" In A State Of Shock

  • SneakPeek
Image Comics' "Blue Estate" #8, now available, is written by Viktor Kalvachev and Andrew Osborne with illustrations and a cover by Kalvachev :"...in 'State Of Shock', secrets aren't the only things laid bare in the aftermath of a reversal of fortune, while ticking time bombs of suspicion and paranoia threaten to blow a dangerous alliance to smithereens. Love is unspoken and promises are made to be broken..."

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Six Terrifying Villains Played By Comedians

  • Nerve
Six Terrifying Villains Played By Comedians For the first time ever, we're scared of Albert Brooks. By Andrew Osborne This week, Albert Brooks makes a welcome return to the screen as a lethal Jewish mobster in Drive — which may seem like a strange casting choice to those familiar with the comedian's roles as the nebbish reporter in Broadcast News or the neurotic fish in Finding Nemo. But as the following list illustrates, the same fear and loathing that so often fuels great comic performances can also create genuinely scary cinematic villains. 1. Bill Murray, Mad Dog and Glory (1993) The premise sounds like a Saturday Night Live gag: timid Robert De Niro cowering fearfully in the presence of a menacing Bill Murray. But the role reversal works surprisingly well in John McNaughton's underworld love story about a lonely civil servant attempting to rescue a young woman named Glory ([...]
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The Sports-Movie Hall of Fame

  • Nerve
The Sports-Movie Hall of Fame Our favorite movies about baseball, basketball, football, and more. By Andrew Osborne Last week, mixed martial arts got the Hollywood treatment with the release of Gavin O'Connor's Warrior (starring Tom Hardy and Joel Edgerton). Herein, we crown the all-time champs in other cinematic sporting events. The all-time best movie about boxing is... Rocky (1976) The simple primal drama of two men strategically beating the crap out of each other has inspired classics from Raging Bull to When We Were Kings. But Sly Stallone's endlessly quotable tale about a palooka's shot at the big time was a much-needed boost for an on-the-ropes nation. Thirty-five years and five sequels later, Rocky remains guaranteed to leave you in a good mood. Runners-up: Raging Bull, When We Were Kings, The Fighter, The Champ   The all-time best movie about baseball is...  Bull Durham (1988) America's pastime [...]
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Five Religious Movies Even An Atheist Could Love

  • Nerve
Five Religious Movies Even An Atheist Could Love As Vera Farmiga struggles with faith in her directorial debut, we contemplate religion on film. By Andrew Osborne Politics, priest scandals, and Stryper have soured religion for many in the twenty-first century, spurring an atheist movement that often recoils (or, in the case of Christopher Hitchens, raises a bemused, condescending eyebrow) at burkas, Bible-thumping, and other conspicuous displays of piety. Clearly attuned to the shifting tide, Vera Farmiga has directed and stars in Higher Ground, a new movie about a Christian woman's struggle with faith, out this Friday. In tribute, we've compiled a list of religious-minded films that even non-believers might enjoy.   1. Persepolis (2007) Religious content: Years after her childhood dreams of being a kung-fu-kicking prophet, a young Iranian woman gets snapped out of a suicidal funk by visions of Allah and Karl Marx. Why atheists might like it: Marjane [...]
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Five Highly Romantic Movies That Are Also Disgusting

  • Nerve
Five Highly Romantic Movies That Are Also Disgusting On the 25th anniversary of The Fly, we feel so lovey-dovey we could throw up. By Andrew Osborne Twenty-five years ago, film fans were shaken by an onscreen romance at once captivating and disgusting. But enough about Shanghai Surprise. In honor of the silver anniversary of David Cronenberg's grotesquely romantic reimagining of the horror classic The Fly, here are our picks for the five most disgusting romantic movies of all time. 1. The Fly (1986) Al Hedison's human-insect hybrid screaming "Help me!" in the original Fly is one of cinema's most enduring images of horror, because... I mean, seriously, what's worse than being a tiny mutant on the verge of being devoured by a spider? But while David Cronenberg's remake definitely amplified the grossness (with Jeff Goldberg's "Brundlefly" vomiting acid onto the appendages [...]
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"Blue Estate: The Money Shot"

  • SneakPeek
Image Comics' "Blue Estate" #5, available August 10, 2011, is written by Viktor Kalvachev and Andrew Osborne, with illustrations by Kalvachev, Toby Cyrpess, Nathan Fox and a cover by Kalvachev :

"...in the 'Money Shot', a private investigator's surveillance photos miss the big picture when Hollywood starlet 'Rachel Maddox' is forced to gamble for her brother's life. Let your freak flag fly as hippies, mobsters and garden gnomes collide..."

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Conan O'Brien Is Kind Of A Dick, And Other Revelations

  • Nerve
Conan O'Brien Is Kind Of A Dick, And Other Revelations Five things we learned about the beloved comic from his new documentary, Conan O'Brien Can't Stop. By Andrew Osborne 1. Conan O'Brien can't stop... whining. Conan O'Brien Can't Stop is a documentary (in limited release today) about The Legally Prohibited From Being Funny On Television Tour, the musical road show that kept the late-night host occupied in the months between leaving The Tonight Show and finding a new home on basic cable. And the wounds suffered by O'Brien and his staff in their skirmish with NBC are still very fresh as the film begins. Yet you might have trouble sympathizing with O'Brien's onscreen bouts of self-pity, especially given the eight-figure severance package he received as compensation for the damage inflicted on his career (and ego). Not only that, but looking [...]
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Five Films That Prove Cameron Diaz Can Act

  • Nerve
Five Films That Prove Cameron Diaz Can Act There's more to the star of Bad Teacher than a toothy grin. By Andrew Osborne In There's Something About Mary, Cameron Diaz portrayed the Farrelly Brothers' fantasy ideal of the perfect woman: hot, goofy, and non-threatening, an approachable sex symbol for the Age of Geeks. It was a charming performance, but after that promising breakthrough, Diaz played the same bubbly part so often that it became a schtick. (Sofia Coppola mercilessly parodied her in Lost In Translation.) This week, Diaz plays against type as the drunk, irresponsible title character in Jake Kasdan's Bad Teacher, and it looks good — which got us scanning her filmography for evidence that she can actually act. Here are five films that prove there's more to Diaz than just a toothy grin and a happy bouncy butt. 1. My Best Friend's Wedding (1997) For [...]
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The Ten Best Films With No Plot

  • Nerve
The Ten Best Films With No Plot As Steve Coogan meanders lovably through this week's The Trip, we survey ten classics where nothing happens. By Andrew Osborne In this week's The Trip, two middle-aged British actors (Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan) banter over gourmet cuisine, do some Michael Caine impressions and... well, that's about it, really. And yet, despite a near total lack of plot, drama, or character arcs, the film is deeply satisfying. Coogan and Brydon bumble along, bantering and griping and doing their best to get by in a way that feels reassuringly familiar. And so, in the midst of all the bombastic, death-defying mutants, pirates, wizards, cowboys, and aliens of summer, we'd like to salute The Trip by listing (in no particular order, appropriately enough) our favorite films where, to quote David Byrne's description of heaven, nothing ever happens. 1. Lost in [...]
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Why I Wanted to See Mel Gibson in The Hangover Part II

  • Nerve
Why I Wanted to See Mel Gibson in The Hangover Part II If you're going to joke about self-destructive men, why not swing for the fences? By Andrew Osborne Mel Gibson is currently on the shit list of just about everyone but Jodie Foster. From all available evidence, he's a homophobe (see: the effeminate prince in Braveheart, an infamous 1991 interview); an anti-Semite (see: The Passion of the Christ, an infamous 2006 DUI stop); a racist (see: infamous 2010 calls to his ex, Oksana Grigorieva); and a misogynist (ditto). And I'm really sad that he got cut from The Hangover Part II. In case you've forgotten, 2009's The Hangover concerned three guys (Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, and Zach Galifianakis) who roofie themselves in Vegas, lose a fourth guy, and hang out with a baby, a tiger, and heavyweight champ Mike Tyson. The central joke of the movie, of [...]
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Could Will Ferrell Make You Cry?

  • Nerve
Could Will Ferrell Make You Cry? The comedian plays it straight in a new adaptation of a Raymond Carver story. By Andrew Osborne Raymond Carver was an acclaimed American short-story writer who focused on the lives of marginalized everymen trapped in lives of quiet desperation. Will Ferrell is an A-list comedian who likes flashing his hairy belly. A perfect match, right? That's the theory behind Everything Must Go, director Dan Rush's adaptation of Carver's short story "Why Don't You Dance?" starring Ferrell as a Nick Halsey, a middle-aged alcoholic who loses his job, then comes home to discover his wife has kicked him out of the house and thrown all his stuff on the lawn. With no particular place to go, Halsey holds an impromptu yard sale, unloading his material possessions (and, possibly, his emotional baggage as well). For Carver fans (or Ferrell [...]
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Ranked: Judd Apatow Movies from Worst to Best

  • Nerve
Ranked: Judd Apatow Movies from Worst to Best Assessing every film from Apatow's gang, from The 40-Year-Old Virgin to the new Bridesmaids. By Andrew Osborne One of the knocks against Judd Apatow has always been that — with the exception of his wife, Leslie Mann — his cinematic clubhouse has largely been a rowdy boys' club. That may explain Apatow's involvement as one of the producers of Bridesmaids, the upcoming Kristin Wiig comedy (directed by Freaks & Geeks alum Paul Feig) that's being promoted as the female answer to raunchy bromances like The Hangover. But where does Bridesmaids fall in the overall Apaverse? To find out, we've created a worst-to-best ranking of every film from Apatow Productions. 15. Drillbit Taylor (2008) Apatow produced this My Bodyguard retread about a bunch of geeks who get continuously and obsessively attacked by a psychotic bully until they eventually hire a homeless con [...]
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The GoD List: Comics for May 4, 2011

Each week, MK2Fac3 and Henchman21 read a lot of comics. Seriously, a lot of comics. Maybe too many comics. They look forward to some more than others, I mean, who doesn’t? So, let’s take a look into the depths of their pull list, grab some issues and we’ll let You know what the top books to look forward to are for the week of May 4, 2011. Single issues and trades, they’re all here.

MK2Fac3 [Picks]

Issues

Blue Estate #2 (Image Comics - $2.99): When the first of this issue of this came out of nowhere to completely blow me away, I knew that I would be anticipating all following issues. The series centers around a bit of fumbling private detective that gets himself a bit over his head when he picks up a case concerning the Russian mafia. Blue Estate is extremely eccentric with a lot of mystery,
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Starlet 'Rachel Maddox' Lives In The "Blue Estate"

Image Comics "Blue Estate" #2, available May 4, 2011 is written by Viktor Kalvachev and Andrew Osborne, with illustrations by Kalvachev, Nathan Fox, Toby Cypress, Robert Valley and a cover by Kalvachev :

"...Hollywood starlet 'Rachel Maddox' plots with her A.A. sponsor to steal a big pile of dirty money from her shady action star husband, 'Bruce'.

"What she doesn'­t know is that her sponsor is a killer, Bruce also wants her dead and her brother 'Billy' just made a bad deal with crime boss 'Tony Luciano'..."

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On the Subtle Appeal of the 5th Fast and the Furious Movie

  • Nerve
On the Subtle Appeal of the 5th Fast and the Furious Movie Plus, the Love Actually of high-school movies, and an Italian comic adaptation about a supernatural detective. By Andrew Osborne Fast Five Director: Justin Lin Cast: Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Jordana Brewster I'm actually kind of psyched for the latest Fast and Furious sequel, in all its bootylicious car-porn glory. This time around, Vin Diesel and the gang are in Rio for some kind of heist, and Dwayne "Don't Call Me The Rock" Johnson is on hand for macho fisticuffs as a federal agent who gets to bark the line, "We find 'em, we take 'em back, and above all else we don't ever, ever let them get into cars." Yeah, good luck with that, Agent Hobbs. Because, see, director Justin Lin (who's been directing the series since [...]
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Instead of Seeing Scream 4, Watch Keanu Reeves Act Like a Human

  • Nerve
Instead of Seeing Scream 4, Watch Keanu Reeves Act Like a Human Scream returns, Keanu Reeves charms, and Robert Redford does something tasteful. Who gets your ticket money? By Andrew Osborne Scream 4 Director: Wes Craven Cast: Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox, David Arquette, Emma Roberts, Hayden Panettiere, Rory Culkin, Alison Brie Let me get this straight — this is a horror movie where everyone talks about the rules of horror movies? Very clever, especially if the characters in Wes Craven's latest rerun acknowledge how the fourth installment of a film franchise is usually a wheezy disaster. (Except, of course, when it involves Captain Kirk saving whales.) Unfortunately, as the original Scream demonstrated, simply calling attention to cliches doesn't necessarily improve them — it merely allows everyone to feel clever and edgy without all the hard work of committing to an actual vision. To be fair, series regulars Courteney Cox and David
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The One Movie You Should See This Week

  • Nerve
The One Movie You Should See This Week Rainn Wilson wields a wrench, the creators of Saw return, and Jake Gyllenhaal time travels again. Who gets your ticket money? By Andrew Osborne Super Director: James Gunn Cast: Rainn Wilson, Ellen Page, Liv Tyler On paper, my pick for the One Movie You Should See This Week seems like a no-brainer. Hell, just the publicity shots of Ellen Page in a yellow and green superhero suit oughta be enough to seal the deal for Super. Plus, the film (about wannabe superheroes) is the brainchild of James Gunn, the writer and co-star of the charming, low-key superhero comedy The Specials (one of my all-time cult faves). And yet I skipped a chance to see this one at SXSW, and I'll be skipping it again this week. Why? Because much as I enjoy small doses of star Rainn Wilson on The [...]
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The Five Best (and One Worst) Movies I Saw at SXSW 2011

  • Nerve
The Best (and Worst) Movies I Saw At SXSW 2011 Featuring Conan O'Brien, Ridley Scott, and one appalling documentary. By Andrew Osborne Austin's South-By-Southwest Film Festival is famously more laid back and idiosyncratic than the taste-making Indiewood buzz factory known as Sundance. And yet, the 2011 edition of SXSW often felt more slick than scruffy, with high-profile projects sharing a certain tonal sameness I can only describe as Sundance-y. Win Win (starring Paul Giamatti), The Beaver (Jodie Foster's study of family dysfunction starring Mel Gibson), and the award winning Christians-gone-wild road-trip warmedy Natural Selection were three different flavors of the same well-crafted, well-acted, self-consciously edgy but ultimately well-behaved formula on show this year. It's a recipe favored by slumming A-listers, big studio "indie" divisions and all the usual suspects of the current festival-industrial complex. Like other films of the Sundance-y genre, they violated the Seinfeld [...]
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The One Movie You Should See This Week

  • Nerve
The One Movie You Should See This Week Aliens blow up Los Angeles, Jane Eyre gets remade, and Christopher Walken plays a Jewish mobster. Who gets your ticket money? By Andrew Osborne Battle: Los Angeles Director: Jonathan Liebesman Cast: Aaron Eckhart, Michelle Rodriguez, Ne-Yo Good news: the weather's getting warmer and we're almost through the mid-winter cinematic drought, with a few decent flicks already poking up like the first buds of spring. Bad news: just as winter surely isn't done with us yet, we still haven't quite escaped the B-movie dregs of early 2011. Even worse news: Hollywood is releasing Mars Needs Moms, another family movie that uses that creepy, dead-eyed Polar Express animation. I mean, if I were a kid looking for a videogame-y alien invasion scenario drenched in CGI, I'd much prefer Battle: Los Angeles, although that's pretty much the only scenario [...]
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