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‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns

‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns
The Western is the quintessential American movie genre. Its iconography has been seared into our collective conscious: the solitary cowboy riding the endless frontier, towns struggling to survive in a lawless land, the quick-drawing gunfighter. Generations of filmmakers have engaged with those symbols, building an entire cinematic language on a genre that began with the simple premise of good “white hats” vs. bad “black hats.” In doing so, they have created mythologies, torn down legends and subverted what it means to be an American.

My exposure to the West began in the living room of my parents’ house. My father, a Sephardic Jew born and raised in Greece, shared with me the movies he loved as a child. Over the years my enthusiasm for the genre only grew as I became a history buff, a lover of myths, and eventually a filmmaker. In interviews, I’m often asked to name my favorite Western,
See full article at Indiewire »

Favorite Moments from Locarno Festival 2017: Schönberg, Seriously Silly, Love Stories

  • MUBI
9 DoigtsThis year at the Locarno Festival I am looking for specific images, moments, techniques, qualities or scenes from films across the 70th edition's selection that grabbed me and have lingered past and beyond the next movie seen, whose characters, story and images have already begun to overwrite those that came just before.***The bracing discovery a one-act opera by Arnold Schönberg in Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet’s From Today Until Tomorrow (1996), which is playing in the festival's Pardo d’onore tribute to Straub. Encountering a film by the husband and wife duo of Straub-Huillet is always at double meeting: one, with the perspective of their filmmaking, but also with whatever source material they are transforming into cinema, whether Bach’s music, dialogues by Cesare Pavese, or in this case, a short opera from 1928 by Schönberg. Where most adaptations for the cinema smother their sources to supposedly be more optimized for the seventh art,
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I Bury The Living / The Screaming Skull

I Bury The Living

Blu-ray

Shout! Factory

1958 / B&W / 1:85 / / 76 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017

Starring: Richard Boone, Theodore Bikel.

Cinematography: Frederick Gately

Film Editor: Frank Sullivan

Written by Louis Garfinkle

Produced by Albert Band, Louis Garfinkle

Directed by Albert Band

I Bury the Living implicates us in a primal childhood thought-crime… what if you stepped on a crack and really did break your mother’s back? What if simply wishing someone dead made it so? Guilt, pure and simple, gives this off–kilter 50’s chiller its lasting power.

The film boasts an off–kilter leading man as well with the crater-faced Richard Boone as Robert Kraft, a small town business man railroaded into managing the family run cemetery. To make matters worse, the perennially gloomy Kraft, already skittish about his disconcerting new position, is saddled with a decrepit, unnaturally chilly workplace watched over by an unnerving bit of decoration, an
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blu-ray Review Round-Up: The Screaming Skull, Contamination .7, The Naked Cage, Demented

Though Scream Factory originally made their name by releasing comprehensive special editions of beloved horror titles and some lesser-known cult films deserving reappraisal, after five years the company is diversifying their output more and more. They struck an exclusive deal to release IFC Midnight titles, they’ve picked up a few films and put them out under the “Scream Factory” imprint, and have even developed and produced their very first original feature, Mark Pavia’s Fender Bender, in 2016. In addition to all of this, Scream Factory has begun releasing smaller and lesser-known catalogue titles, nearly bypassing the special features altogether and just giving some older cult titles their high-def debuts. Included in their latest slate of releases is everything from a John Stamos sci-fi action film (Never Too Young to Die) to an unofficial Troll sequel. Let’s take a look at four of these catalogue titles—The Screaming Skull,
See full article at DailyDead »

A*P*E 3-D

It’s awful, it’s terrible, it’s difficult to watch — but it’s finally available in its original 3-D, in the improved Space-Vision process. A giant monkey attacks Seoul, trashing cardboard buildings, toy boats and a dead shark (and it’s not shamming). Keep a good movie on hand to rinse this one away immediately afterwards. Not recommended for people taking prescription medication. If simians persist, consult your doctor.

A*P*E

3-D Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1976 / Color / 2:35 widescreen 3-D / 87 min. / ‘Attacking Primate monstEr’ / Street Date February 28, 2017 / 29.95

Starring Joanna Kerns, Alex Nicol, Rod Arrants, Nak-hun Lee.

Cinematography Tony Francis, Daniel L. Symmes

Editor Paul Leder

Original Music Bruce McRae

Written byPaul Leder, Reuben Leder

Produced by Paul Leder, K.M. Leung

Directed by Paul Leder

They say home video 3-D is in trouble, but viewers properly equipped are presently experiencing a renaissance in retrofitted and refurbished 3-D features.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Strategic Air Command

The biggest, most lavish hook-up between Hollywood and the Pentagon was this Anthony Mann-James Stewart collaboration, a morale & recruiting cheer for America's intercontinental bombing air force, the service that kept the peace by holding up our side of the balance of fear. Strategic Air Command Blu-ray Olive Films 1955 / Color / 1:66 widescreen (VistaVision) / 112 min. / Street Date October 16, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98 Starring James Stewart, June Allyson, Frank Lovejoy, Barry Sullivan, Alex Nicol, Bruce Bennett, Jay C. Flippen, James Millican, James Bell, Rosemary DeCamp, Harry Morgan, William Hudson, Strother Martin, House Peters Jr. Cinematography William Daniels Film Editor Eda Warren Original Music Victor Young Written by Valentine Davies, Beirne Lay, Jr. Produced by Samuel J. Briskin Directed by Anthony Mann

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

In the 1950s America was spending its enormous military budget on a fantastic array of advanced weapons technology, the most expensive of which was
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

'Art and the theory of art': "The Man from Laramie" and the Anthony Mann Western

  • MUBI
Anthony Mann

As much as any other filmmaker who found a niche in a given genre, in the 10 Westerns Anthony Mann directed from 1950 to 1958 he carved out a place in film history as one who not only reveled in the conventions of that particular form, but also as one who imbued in it a distinct aesthetic and narrative approach. In doing so, Mann created Westerns that were simultaneously about the making of the West as a historical phenomenon, as well as about the making of its own developing cinematic genus. At the same time, he also established the traits that would define his auteur status, formal devices that lend his work the qualities of a director who enjoyed, understood, and readily exploited and manipulated a type of film's essential features.

Though he made several fine pictures outside the Western, Mann as an American auteur is most notably recognized for his work in this field,
See full article at MUBI »

DVD Review: "The House Across The Lake" (1954) From Hammer Films; UK Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

As British noir crime dramas of the Fifties go, The House Across the Lake (1954) is probably as good an example as you could hope to dip into. The tale unfolds in flashback, related by our main protagonist to another character (precisely who is not revealed until the final reel), is embroidered with expositional narration and, though clichéd and not in the least unpredictable, delivers atmosphere by the barrel.

The film is an early entry on the CV of writer-director Ken Hughes (the arguable highpoints of whose career, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Cromwell, remain perennial favourites, whilst his latter-day offerings, Night School and Sextette, are best brushed under the proverbial carpet). Hughes scripted The House Across the Lake from his own source novel, “High Wray”, and also commandeered the director’s chair. Nowadays understandably marketed as a Hammer film, it’s actually the fruit of the company’s earlier incarnation Exclusive Films.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Countdown to Halloween - The Screaming Skull (1958)

To countdown to this year's Halloween, Luke Owen reviews a different horror film every day of October. Next up - The Screaming Skull from 1958...

The Screaming Skull is a motion picture that reaches its climax in shocking horror. It's impact is so terrifying that it may have an unforeseen effect. It may *kill* you! The producers would like to offer a free burial service to anyone who dies of shock..."

That is the opening narration for Alex Nicol's 1958 horror "classic" The Screaming Skull, a movie that has been ridiculed by many including the cast of Mystery Science Theatre 3000 and James Rolfe of Cinemassacre. But for everything that is wrong with the movie (and there is a lot wrong), there is a something about it to be admired.

Let's get off on the right foot to begin with and state that The Screaming Skull is a poor movie. Not from a story telling aspect,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Making Of The West: Mythmakers and truth-tellers

The “adult” Western – as it would come to be called – was a long time coming. A Hollywood staple since the days of The Great Train Robbery (1903), the Western offered spectacle and action set against the uniquely American milieu of the Old West – a historical period which, at the dawn of the motion picture industry, was still fresh in the nation’s memory. What the genre rarely offered was dramatic substance.

Early Westerns often adopted the same traditions of the popular Wild West literature and dime novels of the 19th and early 20th centuries producing, as a consequence, highly romantic, almost purely mythic portraits the Old West. Through the early decades of the motion picture industry, the genre went through several creative cycles, alternately tilting from fanciful to realistic and back again. By the early sound era, and despite such serious efforts as The Big Trail (1930) and The Virginian (1929), Hollywood Westerns were,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Forgotten B&W Horror Movies #6: The Screaming Skull

Movies from the “golden age” of black and white films (approximately the 1930’s through the 1950’s) almost invariably contain well-written dialogue and strikingly subtle humor, making them a favorite among many fans of cinema. The horror movies of this more subtle period in film history are therefore of a cerebral nature, primarily relying on the viewer’s imagination to generate the true sense of horror that modern movies generate through more visual means. It is these oft-ignored horror movies that will be the focus of a series of articles detailing the reasons why true fans of horror movies should rediscover these films.

With this 6th installment in the Forgotten B&W Horror series, we take a look at a little known movie with a couple of interesting twists.

The Screaming Skull (1958), with a cast of unknown actors, tells the tale of a widower and his new bride as they begin
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Exploring The Twilight Zone #99: Young Man’s Fancy

With the entire original run of The Twilight Zone available to watch instantly, we’re partnering with Twitch Film to cover all of the show’s 156 episodes. Are you brave enough to watch them all with us? The Twilight Zone (Episode #99): “Young Man’s Fancy” (airdate 5/11/62) The Plot: A newly-minted husband brings his wife to his childhood home to make plans to sell it, but a powerful force is drawing him back to his late mother and the house she kept exactly as it was when he was in short pants. The Goods: This very well may be the second cruelest episode. Aside from the wicked heartlessness of Time Enough At Last, it rings out with a kind of empty meanness that doesn’t teach a lesson while it tortures an innocent bystander at her weakest point. Sometimes life can be that way, and Virginia Walker (Phyllis Thaxter) learns that the raw way. Virginia
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

See also

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