Akemi Negishi - News Poster

News

Giveaway – Win The Saga of Anatahan on Dual Format

Eureka Entertainment will release The Saga Of Anatahan, Josef von Sternberg’s vulnerable tale of human trauma, survival and redemption, for the first time on home video in the UK on Blu-ray as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in a Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition on August 14th, and we have three copies to give away. Read on for details of how to enter…

Josef von Sternberg – the innovative director with an unmatched eye for detail and a reputation for his intensity – brings to life this vulnerable tale of human trauma, survival and redemption.

Set during the dying stages of World War II, The Saga of Anatahan tells the story of twelve Japanese seaman stranded on a forgotten island for seven years. Accompanied only by Keiko (Akemi Negishi), a young Japanese woman, all rationality and discipline are soon overcome by a struggle for power and control over Keiko’s affections.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Catfight’ Finds Both Brutality and Humanity In Its Bloody Brawls

This Week in Home VideoPlus 20 more new releases to watch at home this week on Blu-ray/DVD.

Welcome to this week in home video! Click the title to buy a Blu-ray/DVD from Amazon and help support Fsr in the process!

Pick of the WeekCatfight

What is it? Two old college friends cross paths as adults and beat the ever-loving crap out of each other.

Why see it? Onur Tukel’s latest is also his best thanks in part to the lead performances by Sandra Oh and Anne Heche. They do a good job of manipulating our sympathies and concerns ensuring that our loyalties shift from act to act. Themes of female friendships, class distinctions, and redemption run through alongside a satirical look at modern life, and there’s a terrifically wicked streak throughout. Funny, smart, and brutal are all apt descriptors for this cynical look at our violent selves.

[Blu-ray/DVD extras: Commentaries, featurette, deleted scenes]

Catfight
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Saga of Anatahan

Take one fiercely individual auteur fed up with the Hollywood game, put him in Kyoto with a full Japanese film company, and the result is a picture critics have been trying to figure out ever since. It’s a realistic story told in a highly artificial visual style, in un-subtitled Japanese. And its writer-director intended it to play for American audiences.

The Saga of Anatahan

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber

1953 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 91 min. / Anatahan, Ana-ta-han / Street Date April 25, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring: Akemi Negishi, Tadashi Suganuma, Kisaburo Sawamura, Shoji Nakayama, Jun Fujikawa, Hiroshi Kondo, Shozo Miyashita, Tsuruemon Bando, Kikuji Onoe, Rokuriro Kineya, Daijiro Tamura, Chizuru Kitagawa, Takeshi Suzuki, Shiro Amikura.

Cinematography: Josef von Sternberg, Kozo Okazaki

Film Editor: Mitsuzo Miyata

Original Music: Akira Ifukube

Special Effects: Eiji Tsuburaya

Written by Josef von Sternberg from the novel by Michiro Maruyama & Younghill Kang

Produced by Kazuo Takimura

Directed by Josef von Sternberg
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Josef Von Sternberg’S Anatahan (1953)

One of the most unusual, and unusually moving swansongs in cinema history, Josef Von Sternberg’s Anatahan (a.k.a. The Saga of Anatahan) returns to American screens this spring in a new restoration which seems destined not to only buff up the movie’s obvious visual splendor but also its standing as an essential and fully engaged work of a master Hollywood stylist rather than simply a curious end post to a remarkable career.

In the early ‘50s Sternberg was coming off two movies made for Howard Hughes—the gorgeously sublimated cold-war adventure Jet Pilot (finished in 1950 but cut extensively by Hughes and held up for release until 1957) and Macao (1952), on which Sternberg and Hughes clashed again, resulting in the director’s replacement by Nicholas Ray. Disillusioned by Hollywood, Sternberg, a long-time devotee of Japanese culture, capitalized on his separation from Hughes and began investigating the possibility, one he
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Josef von Sternberg’s Swan Song ‘Anatahan’ and the Reduction of Humanity

Josef von Sternberg called Anatahan his best film. Borne from more than a decade’s worth of frustration with the studio system, it was, as the last picture he completed, his stamp on his time as a director. Even then, when released in 1953, it was only released in a butchered format, and, as it often goes in such cases, was subsequently abandoned by popular consciousness. But a few times each year, cinephiles (at least ones in major cities) are treated to big-screen resuscitations of long-neglected works. Now, Anatahan has been restored by Kino Lorber to Sternberg’s uncensored version, and it hits theaters again this week.

Anatahan tells the true story of a group of Japanese sailors stranded on the namesake island after a series of shipwrecks in 1944. Abruptly cut off from the war they were fighting, the seamen struggle to maintain order and sanity on the tiny stretch of jungle.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Josef von Sternberg’s Final Film ‘Anatahan’ Gets Theatrical Restoration Trailer

One positive side to the growing digitalization of cinema is the seemingly increased output of classic restorations. The latest is Josef von Sternberg‘s WWII drama (and final film) Anatahan, which has been restored by Kino Lorber. Along with assumedly a Blu-ray later down the road, Kino will release the film back into theaters for a limited run next month.

Sternberg’s last sole directing effort is set during the final days of the war, as a group of Japanese sailors are stranded on the island of Anatahan. Without the knowledge that the war has ended, a much more intimate one breaks out amongst the group over control of the island. The trailer features gorgeous, crisp imagery, and a perfectly fitting ’50s-style narration.

See the trailer below, along with a poster.

Inspired by an actual event during WWII, Josef von Sternberg’s Anatahan, tells the story of a dozen Japanese
See full article at The Film Stage »

See also

Credited With | External Sites