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Trailer Lands For ‘A Prayer Before Dawn’ Starring Joe Cole

Altitude has released the new trailer for the upcoming A Prayer Before Dawn, the new prison drama starring Joe Cole.

The film tells the remarkable true story of Billy Moore, a young English boxer incarcerated for three years in two of Thailand’s most notorious prisons. He is quickly thrown into a world of drugs and gang violence, but when the prison authorities allow him to take part in the Muay Thai boxing tournaments, Billy realises that this is his only hope for survival, taking him on an incredible journey to redemption.

A Prayer Before Dawn features a strikingly visceral performance from breakthrough actor Joe Cole, who plays Moore. Since his training with the National Youth Theatre, Screen International Star of Tomorrow Cole has gone on to earn critical acclaim across the board for his work in television, theatre, and film. Joe is best known for his recurring role of
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Peaky Blinders’ Joe Cole fights for his life in a Thai prison in trailer for A Prayer Before Dawn

Altitude Film Distribution have released the ferocious official trailer for A Prayer Before Dawn, based on the unflinching international best-selling memoir by Billy Moore.

Directed by Johnny Mad Dog’s Jean-Stéphane Sauvaire, breakthrough actor Joe Cole stars in an astonishing performance. If you can’t quite place where you have seen Cole before he is best known for his recurring role of ‘John Sheldon’, younger brother to Cillian Murphy’s ‘Tommy’ in the BBC’s acclaimed Peaky Blinders, and has recently been seen in Hang The DJ’, an episode of the latest series of Black Mirror on Netflix alongside Georgina Campbell in which he has earned a BAFTA nomination.

Also in trailers – Gemma Arterton reaches breaking point in trailer for The Escape

The film will be released in UK and Irish cinemas July 20th.

A Prayer Before Dawn Official Synopsis

A Prayer Before Dawn is the remarkable true story of Billy Moore,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Top 25 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)

  • The Wrap
There is a ridiculous number of original series available on Netflix right now — so many it’s almost impossible to keep up with them. Even Netflix seems to have a tough time making sure its viewers know about its shows. We dug into the annals of Netflix series and plucked out the very best ones for your enjoyment. Here they are in order of great to phenomenal.

25. “Lost in Space

Netflix’s take on the 1960s TV show about a family marooned on a weird alien planet, with only each other, their pilot, a robot, and a self-serving doctor for company is a lot of fun. A (mostly) more realistic take than the original, the show manages to capture an interesting family dynamic while still tapping into over-the-top sci-fi ideas.

24. “Dark”

“Dark” concerns a small German town where children have disappeared — just like 30 years ago. The story starts out as a fascinating, character-driven drama, but quickly starts to pick up speed with some paranormal, science fiction-y elements. There’s a lot more to the mystery than first meets the eye in “Dark,” and the show does a great job of weaving it over the course of its first season.

Also Read: 13 Time Travel TV Shows You Should Be Watching Right Now (Photos)

23. “3%”

Netflix’s first original series from Brazil takes place in a dystopian future. The poor live in squalor but have a chance when they turn 20 to earn their way into paradise. They just have to be smart, capable, and willing to stab each other in the back.

22. “BoJack Horseman”

It takes a bit to hit its stride, but once it does, “BoJack Horseman” joins the top tier of animation geared at adults. The goofy comedy combines solid writing and a cynical look at Hollywood with a darker look at issues like depression.

21. “Peaky Blinders

Cillian Murphy and Sam Neill facing off from opposite sides of the law in post-World War I Britain is enough to make “Peaky Blinders” worth a watch. But its great casting and rock music-amplified tone make it a period crime drama that’s unpredictable in a completely violent way.

Also Read: 'Black Mirror' Doesn't Seem So Bad Next To Trump's America (Commentary)

20. “The Crown

It’s not easy being queen. “The Crown” digs into the personal stories of the British royal family as Queen Elizabeth II is crowned. Elizabeth is constantly pulled between family squabbles, politics, personal responsibility and her duties, and there’s plenty of drama to go around.

19. “The Fall

The gritty British thriller starring Gillian Anderson of “The X-Files” fame is split between two perspectives: Anderson’s Detective Gibson and the serial killer she’s hunting. Anderson is consistently great as the no-nonsense Gibson, who hunts the killer while fighting off controversy among the police and the press.

Also Read: All 55 Terms Defined on Netflix’s ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events,’ and the Definitions Given

18. “Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events”

This adaptation of the children’s book series of the same name manages a hilariously melancholy tone. Neil Patrick Harris slays the role of the ridiculously evil Count Olaf, and the rest of the show is full of great performances from a series of stars.

17. “Santa Clarita Diet

There’s a lot to love about “Santa Clarita Diet” and it’s fun take on the undead. Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant in particular are hilariously square suburbanites. The way they take to murdering people for the newly zombified Barrymore to eat, in order to preserve their family, is weirdly heartwarming and constantly funny.

16. “Travelers”

“Travelers” goes gritty with its time travel, imagining agents from the future who have to take over the bodies of people in the past in order to stop the end of the world. The best stuff here is the personal drama as the characters battle their own guilt at the harm they sometimes have to do for the greater good.

15. “Dear White People

Adapting the movie of the same name into a series, “Dear White People” digs into race and racism in an Ivy League school. The series is poignant and smart, as well as hilarious all the way through as it finds smart, funny ways to tackle tough topics.

14. “Marvel’s Daredevil”

The first of Netflix’s original shows featuring Marvel superheroes was a surprisingly dark and intense take. With awesome action and strong stories, “Daredevil” gave Marvel fans a more subdued, believable kind of superhero story in its two seasons.

13. “American Vandal

American Vandal” turns true crime documentary into a comedy, digging into the mystery of who was responsible for spray painting faculty cars at a high school. The show is simultaneously a send-up of super-serious crime docs, and an enthralling and effective mystery all on its own.

12. “Making a Murderer

The deep-dive documentary into the investigation of the murder of Teresa Halbach stretches on for 10 episodes, but it’s never boring. Instead, it presents a look into the investigation and conviction of Steven Avery that has sent many viewers digging into the case looking for the truth themselves.

11. “Marvel’s Luke Cage”

Netflix’s superhero offerings do a stellar job of expanding Marvel stories into perspectives fans might not be used to seeing. “Luke Cage” takes viewers to Harlem, and it’s just as conscious of the implications of following a black man who’s immune to being shot as it is of how cool it would be to have bullet-proof skin.

10. “Marvel’s Jessica Jones”

The second partnership of Netflix and Marvel pits the super-strong but flawed Jessica Jones against a mind-controlling man she can’t convince anyone exists. “Jessica Jones” is more drama than action, and watching her try to out-maneuver the manipulative Purple Man is often more exciting than flying superhero fists.

9. “Narcos”

The saga of Pablo Escobar’s rise to power and the DEA agents tasked with stopping him is a powerhouse of strong acting. There’s no shortage of crime story violence and mystery in the lengthy drug war Escobar wages, which now covers two seasons.

8. “Mindhunter”

Director David Fincher hits two competing feelings all the way through “Mindhunter.” As FBI agents Ford and Tench create a new kind of profiling in the 1970s by interviewing serial killers, the show oscillates between being morbidly fascinating and increasingly dread-inducing. Either way, it’s hard to turn away from this crime story.

7. “Stranger Things”

Netflix’s “Stranger Things” perfectly channels a 1980s movie aesthetic and tells a compelling monster-slash-government conspiracy story. It’s also that certain sort of kid-driven Steven Spielberg or Stephen King kind of story that there just aren’t enough of in the 21st Century.

6. “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”

This Tina Fey-co-created comedy starts with a strange premise — Kimmy (Ellie Kemper) has escaped a bunker after being kidnapped by a doomsday evangelist for years. But Kemper’s relentlessly upbeat attitude and the supporting zany cast make “Unbreakable” something of a weirdo answer to “30 Rock.” You’ll need to rewatch it to catch all of the hidden jokes.

5. “The Keepers”

A true crime documentary series that looks to explore the decades-old murder of Sister Cathy Cesnik in Baltimore. Netflix’s excellent doc spirals into a much deeper and more chilling story that delves into sexual abuse in a Catholic high school, and the murder that might have happened to cover it up.

4. “Ozark”

When a money launderer has to convince the drug cartel he works for not to kill him, he has to cart his whole family from Chicago to Missouri in Netflix’s crime drama. Imagine “Breaking Bad,” but with less chemistry and the entire family involved in trying desperately to keep from getting caught, satisfy the bad guys and stay together.

3. “House of Cards”

Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) is backstabbing his way to greater power in the halls of Washington D.C. It’s occasionally ridiculous, but great performances by Spacey, Robin Wright, and many more make Underwood’s machinations hard to guess and harder to stop watching.

2. “Orange is the New Black”

The longer “Oitnb” goes on, the better it gets, as it delves into the diverse perspectives of its women’s prison population. It’s an examination of the justice system, of people trying to make the best of a bad situation, and of friendship and survival. It’s also consistently hilarious and sports a phenomenal cast.

1. “Master of None”

Aziz Ansari brings a rare brand of comedy that’s instantly relatable. Whether it’s about navigating life at 30 or the experience of growing up in America as the child of immigrants, “Master of None” has a unique, extremely funny perspective. The second season is even better with the first, mixing hilarious and very real moments.

Read original story Top 25 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos) At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Brad Dourif Was Never Approached To Play Scarecrow In Batman Forever

If you’re familiar with what went on behind the scenes in the time separating Batman Returns and Batman Forever back in the 1990’s, then you’re no doubt aware of how Tim Burton was originally thought to come back for a third tour of Gotham City. In short, his threequel would’ve still featured Michael Keaton as the Caped Crusader and Robin Williams as the Riddler – and quite possibly Billy Dee Williams as Two-Face, reprising his role of Harvey Dent from the ’89 flick.

Of course, it simply wasn’t meant to be, as Warner Bros. couldn’t ignore the fury of parents’ groups saying that Batman Returns was too dark and sexy, and how said outrage led to McDonald’s pulling the line of Happy Meal toys from their restaurants. Thus, Joel Schumacher was brought on to replace Burton with the directive of taking the franchise in a more family friendly direction.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Your Handy Guide to When and Where Netflix's Peaky Blinders Is Set

If you haven't lost a weekend to Peaky Blinders on Neflix yet, you're in for a treat. The gritty 1920s drama, which stars Cillian Murphy and Tom Hardy, is already a huge hit in the UK where it's filmed, and it's quickly becoming a cult classic with Us audiences too. But with its stylized setting, movie-like cinematography, and modern soundtrack, you'd be forgiven for wondering when, exactly, it's supposed to be set. If you're at all confused, don't worry - we've compiled a handy guide for when and where Shelby Company Limited pops up throughout England.

Related: Cillian Murphy Gives You 25 Sexy Reasons to Watch Peaky Blinders Season 1

Although the first season is set in and around Birmingham, a city in central England, much of it is actually filmed further north, around Liverpool. The action begins in 1919, and the old terraced streets of Victorian houses are the perfect stand-in for post-wwi Birmingham.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

‘Annihilation’ Director Alex Garland Speaks Out on Screwing With Genre and Studio Panic Attacks

‘Annihilation’ Director Alex Garland Speaks Out on Screwing With Genre and Studio Panic Attacks
The brainy 47-year-old son of a British political cartoonist, Alex Garland made his name with novels “The Beach” and “The Tesseract” before moving on to a tortuous relationship with Hollywood. After Leonardo DiCaprio starred in Danny Boyle’s movie version of “The Beach” (Fox), Garland turned to screenwriting on two original grim visions of the future for Boyle and Fox Searchlight, zombiefest “28 Days Later” and sci-fi space trip “Sunshine,” both starring Cillian Murphy, followed by 2012 comic-book flop “Dredd” (Lionsgate).

Backed by Focus Features, Garland’s stunning directorial debut “Ex Machina,” a tense sci-fi three-hander starring Oscar Isaac as a genius robot designer, Alicia Vikander as his wily femme bot, and Domnhall Gleeson as the gullible man who falls for her, was inexplicably rejected for theatrical release and was taken on by A24. Focus president Peter Schlessel lost his job when the movie scored $25 million domestic and two Oscar nominations (including
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Annihilation’ Director Alex Garland Speaks Out on Screwing With Genre and Studio Panic Attacks

‘Annihilation’ Director Alex Garland Speaks Out on Screwing With Genre and Studio Panic Attacks
The brainy 47-year-old son of a British political cartoonist, Alex Garland made his name with novels “The Beach” and “The Tesseract” before moving on to a tortuous relationship with Hollywood. After Leonardo DiCaprio starred in Danny Boyle’s movie version of “The Beach” (Fox), Garland turned to screenwriting on two original grim visions of the future for Boyle and Fox Searchlight, zombiefest “28 Days Later” and sci-fi space trip “Sunshine,” both starring Cillian Murphy, followed by 2012 comic-book flop “Dredd” (Lionsgate).

Backed by Focus Features, Garland’s stunning directorial debut “Ex Machina,” a tense sci-fi three-hander starring Oscar Isaac as a genius robot designer, Alicia Vikander as his wily femme bot, and Domnhall Gleeson as the gullible man who falls for her, was inexplicably rejected for theatrical release and was taken on by A24. Focus president Peter Schlessel lost his job when the movie scored $25 million domestic and two Oscar nominations (including
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Big B, Kamal, Mani Ratnam, Srk and Aamir to share dais with Christopher Nolan?

Cinema The director of ‘The Dark Knight’ and ‘Inception’ will be in Mumbai to take part in an event to preserve celluloid film in the digital age.Digital NativeIt has already been reported that the Hollywood director Christopher Nolan would be in India to take part in an event that would be on the preservation of celluloid film in the current digital era. Well, it is now almost confirmed that the Bollywood icon, Amitabh Bachchan would be hosting the event titled ‘Reframing the Future of Film’ at the Tata Theatre in Mumbai. The exact dates of this event is yet to be announced. This is one of the biggest film-related events that is going to happen in to the country with almost all the top stars, filmmakers and technicians agreeing to grace the occasion. Reports are that director Mani Ratnam, actors Kamal Haasan, Aamir Khan, Shah Rukh Khan, Shyam Benegal, Santosh Sivan, Anurag Kashyap, Farhan Akhtar, and others will be attending this event. Christopher Nolan, an aclaimed English-American director, producer, and screenwriter, has directed ten feature films and four short films. His career as a feature film director began with the 1998 directorial Following. He then went on to direct movies such as Memento, Insomnia, Batman Begins, The Prestige, The Dark Knight, Inception, The Dark Knight Rises, Interstellar and Dunkirk. His last film release, Dunkirk, starred Fionn Whitehead, Tom Glynn-Carney, Jack Lowden, Harry Styles, Aneurin Barnard, James D'Arcy, Barry Keoghan, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance and Tom Hardy. The film was made on a budget of $100 million and went on to collect $525.6 million worldwide. Christopher Nolan has won several awards in his career including Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year Award, the Board of the Governors Award, the Contribution to Cinematic Imagery Award, Visionary Award, the Writers Guild of America Award for the Best Original Screenplay for Inception, the African-American Film Critics Association for Best Picture for The Dark Knight. (Content provided by Digital Native)
See full article at The News Minute »

The Party – Review

Patricia Clarkson as April pops a champagne cork before sparks start to fly, in Sally Potter’s darkly comic satire The Party. Photo courtesy of Roadside Attractions ©

In Sally Potter’s The Party, what starts out as a quiet little celebration rapidly transforms into a series of shocking revelations and emotional meltdowns in this delicious dark comedy. The resulting film crackles with energy, head-whipping twists, and whip-smart humor. What starts out as a happy occasion quickly devolves into shocking revelations, verbal fireworks and general debacle.

The Party packs in a lot in its mere 71 minutes. Shot in a crisp black and white, writer/director Potter gets right down to business of introducing these sharp-witted and often acid tongue characters and hen upsetting what was supposed to be a quiet little celebration with old friends after a long-sought victory, along with everyone’s carefully built world.

Newly-elected British politician Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Ready Player One, Isle of Dogs, Love, Simon and all of the movies you need to see in theatres this March

  • Cineplex
Ready Player One, Isle of Dogs, Love, Simon and all of the movies you need to see in theatres this MarchReady Player One, Isle of Dogs, Love, Simon and all of the movies you need to see in theatres this MarchAdriana Floridia3/1/2018 10:04:00 Am

Spring is almost here!

With Spring comes a new slate of movies to watch in March. Some of them we'll bet you've been highly anticipating, such as A Wrinkle in Time or Ready Player One, while others may have only recently entered your radar, like Unsane or Love, Simon.

Whether you already know it or not, there's tons to watch in March, and we're here with our recommendations below!

Red Sparrow

Release Date: March 2nd, 2018

For Fans of: Jennifer Lawrence, Russian accents, cool spy thrillers

See it with: A friend

An all-star cast joins Jennifer Lawrence, giving us her best Russian accent as ballerina-turned-secret agent Dominika Egorova.
See full article at Cineplex »

Patricia Clarkson, Kristin Scott Thomas and Sally Potter talk The Party

  • Cineplex
Patricia Clarkson, Kristin Scott Thomas and Sally Potter talk The PartyPatricia Clarkson, Kristin Scott Thomas and Sally Potter talk The PartyMarni Weisz - Editor, Cineplex Magazine2/28/2018 10:00:00 Am

It’s no surprise that small films often tackle the biggest ideas.

Take, for example, writer and director Sally Potter’s The Party, a real-time, black and white film that runs 70 minutes, takes place in a single house (just the main floor, actually), and features only seven actors.

Kristin Scott Thomas plays Janet, an opposition-party politician who’s throwing a party to celebrate her appointment as Britain’s Shadow Minister for Health at the home she shares with her husband Bill (Timothy Spall). Their guests are Tom (Cillian Murphy), an Irish banker, the intellectual lesbian couple Jinny (Emily Mortimer) and Martha (Cherry Jones), and Janet’s American friend April (Patricia Clarkson) and her soon-to-be-ex Gottfried (Bruno Ganz), a German life coach.
See full article at Cineplex »

Movie Review – The Party (2018)

The Party, 2018.

Directed by Sally Potter.

Starring Kristen Scott Thomas, Timothy Spall, Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones, Emily Mortimer, and Cillian Murphy.

Synopsis:

A celebratory gathering hosted by Janet (Kristen Scott Thomas) brings together a generation of friends, lovers, and family members, for a soirée that will escalate beyond family squabbles, to guns, duplicity, and revelations.

Sally Potter’s first film since 2012’s beautifully cold to the touch Ginger & Rosa is a film equally as harsh. Throwing together a shuffling spectre of a husband (Timothy Spall), a cynical best friend (Patricia Clarkson), her faith healing other half (Bruno Ganz), the newly pregnant Jinny and Martha (Cherry Jones and Emily Mortimer), and suave coke sniffing money man, Tom (Cillian Murphy), the barbed exchanges are at first coated in subtlety, before all pretense is dropped and the forked tongues fly.

Sounds like a delicious concoction for some witty repartee and boardwalk back-and-forth,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Guide to ‘Annihilation’ Director Alex Garland’s Trailblazing Sci-Fi Career

  • Indiewire
[Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with Paramount’s “Annihilation” – in theaters February 23rd. Click here for more details.]

From his screenwriting debut, the 2002 sci-fi classic “28 Days Later,” to his directorial debut, the 2015 breakthrough “Ex Machina,” filmmaker Alex Garland has proven himself to be a trailblazing force in modern sci-fi cinema.

His latest, “Annihilation,” follows a biologist (Natalie Portman) who teams up with a group of scientists (played by Gina Rodriguez, Tessa Thompson, among others) to explore an environmental disaster zone that has claimed the lives of nearly every other person who has entered Area X — including her husband (Oscar Isaac), who is gravely ill.

First reactions to the film have called it “brilliant,” “riveting,” and “wickedly disturbing” — a worthy follow-up to the critically acclaimed “Ex Machina.” Ahead of “Annihilation,” which debuts this Friday, get up to speed with the rest of Garland’s oeuvre in this quick primer.

“28 Days Later” (2002)

While Garland first achieved pop culture
See full article at Indiewire »

The Party movie review: bring your own battle

MaryAnn’s quick take… Sally Potter’s brutally snappy take on the classic British drawing-room comedy hauls it into the 21st century with a cutting takedown of the anxieties and hypocrisies of well-off left-wingers. I’m “biast” (pro): love the cast; desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto) women’s participation in this film

(learn more about this)

Politician Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas: Darkest Hour, Suite Française) is hosting a small gathering of close friends to celebrate her new job: shadow health minister (sort of like a minority leadership position in American legislatures). It doesn’t go well, to say the least.

It’s been five years since writer-director Sally Potter’s last film — the poignant and powerful teenage girl’s coming-of-age tale Ginger & Rosa — and she is back with a wicked vengeance. The Party
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Scott Reviews Sally Potter’s The Party [Theatrical Review]

A party has many connotations, at least two of which – a festive gathering and a political organization – are the direct subjects of Sally Potter’s new film. Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) is throwing a small soiree to celebrate her new appointment as the opposition party’s minister of health (never stated, but based on her stated views, presumably the left-leaning Labour group). This two-fold approach, of a celebration amongst similarly-minded individuals, suggests a unity that is not there. Indeed, in most common understandings of any type of party, a sense of shared purpose and harmony is almost assumed. Potter doesn’t see much of that going around.

Those gathered are Janet’s husband Bill (Timothy Spall), his college roommate Martha (Cherry Jones) and her newly-pregnant partner Jinny (Emily Mortimer), and Janet’s oldest friend April (Patricia Clarkson) and her own significant other Gottfried (Bruno Ganz). Banker Tom (Cillian Murphy) also wanders in,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Sally Potter Throws ‘The Party’; Spc Bows ‘Loveless’ – Specialty B.O. Preview

Several foreign productions lead the pack of this weekend's Specialty newcomers just as future foreign contenders take the spotlight at the Berlin International Film Festival. Berlinale '17 prize winner The Party by Sally Potter takes its bow in the U.S. via Roadside Attractions. The black and white feature, which along with Kristin Scott Thomas and Timothy Spall also features Patricia Clarkson, Emily Mortimer, Cherry Jones and Cillian Murphy, peppers in a decent shake of…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Join "The Party"

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek new footage, plus images from the comedy feature "The Party", written and directed by Sally Potter, starring Timothy Spall, Kristin Scott Thomas, Patricia Clarkson, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy and Bruno Ganz:

"...'Janet', a politician for the opposition party, has just been announced shadow minister for health and is having a small celebratory party at her house. 

"Invited are her friends 'April', with her estranged German partner 'Gottfried', a life coach and self-proclaimed spiritual healer, Women's studies professor 'Martha', with her partner 'Jinny', a cook, and Janet's colleague and subordinate 'Marianne' with husband 'Tom', a banker.

"Before the party begins and even after the guests arrive, Janet's husband 'Bill' sits in his chair, listening to music, staring vacantly, and drinking wine. All invited guests come, with the exception of Marianne, who Tom says will arrive later. 

"Tom is extremely nervous and immediately locks himself in the bathroom, where
See full article at SneakPeek »

'The Party' Review: Caustic War of Words Will Knock the Wind Out of You

'The Party' Review: Caustic War of Words Will Knock the Wind Out of You
The laughs hurt so good, and the guests at this shindig treat each other like dartboards for 71 minutes. Yes, that's short for a movie, but your nerves couldn’t take more. The Party is the work of Sally Potter, the gifted experimental filmmaker who had a seismic effect on world cinema with Orlando (1992), based on the Virginia Woolf novel and starring Tilda Swinton as an Elizabethan gent who morphs into a woman over the next four centuries. We bring this up only to prepare novices for the fact that Potter,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Greta Gerwig Reveals the ‘Dunkirk’ Scene That Made Her Cry and More of Her Favorite Moments From Oscar Nominees

Greta Gerwig Reveals the ‘Dunkirk’ Scene That Made Her Cry and More of Her Favorite Moments From Oscar Nominees
Greta Gerwig knows a thing or two about crafting a perfect scene. After all, what is “Lady Bird” but the agglomeration of dozens of perfect scenes? Gerwig recently attended the Santa Barbara International Film Festival (via Collider) to talk all things “Lady Bird,” but Gerwig made sure to spend some time talking about the scenes from the films directed by her fellow nominees.

Gerwig has caught up on her fellow Best Director nominees’ movies, and she was able to speak clearly about the moment in each film that affected her most. In Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” it was the naked embrace between Sally Hawkins’ character and Doug Jones’ fish creature. In “Get Out,” it was the combined effect of watching the film with a packed house at the movie theater and the moment when Kaluuya’s performance becomes undeniable tender.

Lady Bird” is nominated for five Oscars,
See full article at Indiewire »

Home Entertainment: ‘The Party’ DVD Review

Upon viewing Sally Potter’s The Party, traditional theatergoers in particular may be disillusioned with the fact that this is a story that looks meant for the stage. It takes place in a single setting, runs for a mere 71 minutes, and paces itself through the skillfully written conversations and performances of its cast. In spite of its theatricality however, the film cements itself as an art house gem through its stylish black-and-white aesthetic and an engagingly thorough series of twists that expertly grips its audience into the numerous primary and secondary dramas boiling underneath this ensemble of intellectuals. A film in which each line of dialogue feels meticulously composed, The Party may very well be one of the most purely intellectual comedies of the year, as its humor comes not from any form of slapstick or excessive profanity but through its biting wit alone.

The Party revolves around a gathering
See full article at The Hollywood News »
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